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Restorer32

Tucker Convertible on E-Bay

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Says it was "featured" at AACA Hershey Fall Meet among other places. I suppose being for sale in the Car Corral could be considered "featured" in this age of spin. I notice they now also acknowledge that the convertible top assembly is from a '48 Cadillac or Buick.

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Wow,

It's up to 800 grand...These guys woud do well to lower their reserve, take the money,

and run. Course, they need to pay the author of the manifesto, er, listing,

his healthy creative-writing fee; that's worth at least 25 G's...

The really big question, though, the age-old one, is, what do you owe when you

sell your Soul to the Devil?

TG

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It was previously "bid" to over 1.5 million at auction, I believe, and of course it did not meet "Reserve". It IS an interesting study in "what could have been".

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Wonder how much $$$ is invested in it at this point... ?

I wonder if the owners figured, "hey, if they are knuckleheads out there willing to pay seven figures for a 1970's muscle-car "CLONE", what could we get for a "prototype" Tucker rag-top?"

?

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Anyone else get this spam email with the title "Al Prueitt Endorsed Tucker Convertible on eBay"? Who is Al Prueitt?

The Tucker 48 sedan was unlike any other car in the world when it was introduced. Some of its most unique features were a "Safety Windshield", a centered swiveling third headlight, a quick swap power train setup, and a rear mounted "flat six" aircraft engine that had been modified. The Safety Windshield was anti-shard laminated and was designed to be easily removed in the case of an accident. The centered swiveling third headlight was synchronized to the movement of the steering wheel to help the driver see around bends in the road. Even today, synchronized headlights don't appear in any but the most expensive cars and their appearance is a relatively recent addition to what are supposed to be "state of the art" automobiles. The quick swap power train setup, that is the engine and transmission, was designed to be easily pulled out of a troubled vehicle within fifteen minutes of arriving at a Tucker service department. This system was developed so that customers could drop off the power train at the dealership and leave quickly with a "loaner power train." This would allow an owner to avoid waiting, sometimes for days, as their car was repaired, an inconvenience common among conventional cars. Imagine the advantage of such an option if you were on a long distance trip with a car full of kids. The Tucker 48's rear mounted Franklin aircraft engine could go from zero to sixty in just seven seconds! This kind of performance eclipses that of many of today's full size luxury sedans. Because of the "flat six" design, which means that the engine has six horizontally opposed cylinders, the car had a much lower center of gravity. This allowed it to navigate corners and winding roads as if it were a European sports car. Today, the Tucker has captured the imagination of car collectors everywhere as they speculate about what might have been. Could the "Big Three" have ever caught up? We may never know, but the memory of this great company lives on through the one-of-a-kind Tucker Convertible.

You have to visit www.benchmarkclassics.com to view the complete description and to see all the pictures of this all American beauty.

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Thanks...I think I will "snipe" it right at the end :rolleyes:

I doubt there is someone out there who would/could buy this car that doesn't know it is up for sale...looks like all this is for is to try and establish the level (money) of interest.

For all we know the reserve is at 2,000,000 :eek:

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Anyone else get this spam email with the title "Al Prueitt Endorsed Tucker Convertible on eBay"? Who is Al Prueitt?

Al Prueitt operates a restoration shop in Glen Rock, Pa which is south of York, Pa. I'm pretty sure Al is retired, and his sons operate the business. They do superb restoration. They always have an example of their work at the AACA annual meeting.

I'm surprised at the statement endorsing the Tucker. If it is true then, I guess something has changed at the shop. Perhaps they are exploring custom modifications? Does anyone know?

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Wow, I just read the ebay auction. Somebody needs a creative writing award...

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Anyone else get this spam email with the title "Al Prueitt Endorsed Tucker Convertible on eBay"? Who is Al Prueitt?

Al Prueitt operates a restoration shop in Glen Rock, Pa which is south of York, Pa. I'm pretty sure Al is retired, and his sons operate the business. They do superb restoration. They always have an example of their work at the AACA annual meeting.

I'm surprised at the statement endorsing the Tucker. If it is true then, I guess something has changed at the shop. Perhaps they are exploring custom modifications? Does anyone know?

Al is in his mid 80's and still in decent health and hasn't been directly involved with the business for years. Prior to starting a restoration business many years ago he was the curator of Gene Zimmerman's Automobile O'Rama. A good knowledgeable car guy that really knows the older stuff down to the smallest detail.

Dave Pruiett now runs the restoration shop and it has been renamed Prueitt restorations and they mostly do original restorations. They have won so many AACA and Concour's awards it would probably take you a day to count them. The last time I was in their overflow building there were 40 vehicles plus awaiting their turn for restoration.

Al swears the Tucker is real from his dealing with it from the 60's, and his opinion may not necessarily be the opinion of the shops.

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Does anyone know what the final bid was? Did it reach reserve?

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From the Ebay ad text:

"The following was pulled from a sworn, signed, and notarized affidavit provided by Al Prueitt: "In 1966, I saw the rolling chassis and many sheet metal parts for the Tucker Convertible, along with other Tucker 48 Sedans. I also saw that the convertible was stamped #57 and its frame was reinforced at that time. I have also recently seen and inspected the Tucker Convertible and have verified its authenticity." We have posted the documentation we have, including the affidavits, on the Tucker Convertible's website for the world to see."

All that I can figure out that Al is authenticating is that the frame of #57 was reinforced sometime before he saw it in 1966 and that the current car contains the same frame. I don't see how that is supposed to prove it to be a Tucker Factory Built prototype.

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Did anybody ever see what the "Grapes of Wrath" car that we talked about on this forum went for at auction?

I own 1934 Ford once owned by Henry Ford. Want it? Now reduced to a low low Clearance Price of $500,000.

post-32318-14313819468_thumb.jpg

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ummmm...wouldn't ALL Fords of the time have been owned by Henry Ford first, then customer second? Or is that (tongue in cheek) what you meant........I'm getting slow in my old age, can hardly can keep up with the tortoises, much less the hares......

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Al is in his mid 80's and still in decent health and hasn't been directly involved with the business for years. Prior to starting a restoration business many years ago he was the curator of Gene Zimmerman's Automobile O'Rama. A good knowledgeable car guy that really knows the older stuff down to the smallest detail.

Dave Pruiett now runs the restoration shop and it has been renamed Prueitt restorations and they mostly do original restorations. They have won so many AACA and Concour's awards it would probably take you a day to count them. The last time I was in their overflow building there were 40 vehicles plus awaiting their turn for restoration.

Al swears the Tucker is real from his dealing with it from the 60's, and his opinion may not necessarily be the opinion of the shops.

Thanks Ron for the update. I knew Gene Zimmerman personally, I worked for him parking cars at the Holiday Inn Town way back in 1969. Gene liked my '62 Corvair Spyder, all black with a white racing stripe. He called it the 'Skunk', but he allowed me to park it in the hotel underground garage when I was downtown at school, or work. When I was on duty I always parked his car at his request. I quess he knew a future car guy. I never knew Al worked for him at the Holiday West with Gene's car collection. What a lucky guy.

Knowing Al's reputation, I'd be willing to wager that the Tucker just might be the real deal.

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Jim, all that I have seen is that Al authenticates that the frame was reinforced when he saw it in 1966. He does not authenticate it as having come from the factory in 1948.

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Jim, all that I have seen is that Al authenticates that the frame was reinforced when he saw it in 1966. He does not authenticate it as having come from the factory in 1948.

Yes, that is the thing. I have much respect for Al Pruiett (I worked for his shop in the 1980s) and if he says the parts are authentic that adds credibility with me. But the car was still assembled from parts. At least they are mostly actual Tucker parts, but still parts.

Of course my opinion means little on this as I don't have $2,000,000.

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Does anyone know what the final bid was? Did it reach reserve?

I don't know. I got out of the bidding at 750,000. LOL!...........

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If this Tucker had been finished as a standard four door sedan (instead of a convertible), do you think the car would be more acceptable to the old car community? I seem to recall that after the factory was closed, several Tuckers were built from leftover parts. Are those cars considered "real" Tuckers, or does controversy follow them as well?

.

.

.

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In my opinion, If they were completed cars that were initially left incomplete when the factory was closed, and were completed as originally designed, they would be accepted without problem. They would be just as AACA eligible as another production car that was restored using NOS parts or correct aftermarket parts.

If they appear as originally available from the manufacturer, they would be accepted like any other restored car.

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I'm still finding it amazing that here on this forum the originality of the convertible Tucker is under the microscope regularly. Does anyone know what the price of a Tucker hardtop would be if one were available?

The ebay auction to me demonstrated that somebody or a few interested buyers really like the car.

I believe if we keep discussing this vehicle it will eventually be so popular that the 1.5 mil price listed in Hemmings will be met.

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