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Fixing Cigar / cigarette lighter on a 64 Riv...


Scotsbass
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Dear Members,

Firstly. let me apologize to the fine people of the Association for raising such a lowly question, however, as they were on the car when it rolled off the line, I would like to restore them both, front and back, to working order.

I have checked them on the meter, but have no power to either; for the rear the dome lights and trunk light work, so I'm presuming that the fuse is good. For the front, all I can find in the original handbook is that the fuse for the front lighter is in the rear of the assembly somewhere(?) and that the fuse itself is "special".....not entirely helpful.

Once again, I thank you in advance for any light you mat be able to shed. (Sorry, but as my old Gran used to say, "A badly considered, and poorly thought through pun is better than no pun at all!")

Kind regards

Keith

PS - I'm also not sure where the lamp is for the front assembly

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Yes, it is special. It screws onto the end of the light socket and looks like this:

cascolighterfusebayonet.th.jpg

Click on image to enlarge.

They are kind of hard to find. They are a special high-amperage fuse, to handle the load of a lighter.

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Hey Jim,

Thanks for that picture! I try to keep a digital archive of stuff for future need, but I actually have a "now" need.

I've been looking for 2 fuses. Both of mine are shot, but I found a working one at a swap meet last week and the guy only wanted 50 cents for it!!!

Anyway, if anyone knows the whereabouts of some more I would appreciate a reply. :)

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Another option is to remove the original fuse and patch in a 30 AMP line fuse by attaching a lead to the end terminal of the lighter and splicing in a line fuse up the line a bit. Did it to both of my lighters with success. Just make sure the lead does not hit the ground side of the lighter.

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Jim I replaced my fuse at the end of my lighter and when I pushed it in I blew both of the fuses. Any sugestions on why it would blow because I still have one more but want to find the problem before I install the other one. Thanks Gerry I have a 65 Riv.

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Jim I replaced my fuse at the end of my lighter and when I pushed it in I blew both of the fuses. Any sugestions on why it would blow because I still have one more but want to find the problem before I install the other one. Thanks Gerry I have a 65 Riv.

Well...

I have heard that these fuses go bad with age, so you might just have bad fuses.

Or your lighter element may be shorted out. You can try to read it out with a meter but I can tell you it is less than 1 ohm when good; hard to tell that from a short!

I never actually use the lighters in these cars. They draw so many amps that I am afaid some other part of the electrical system will catch fire. I just use the outlets as power outlets for cell phone, GPS, etc. Things that draw a mere trickle if current.

Test the fuses that you think have blown with a meter. Perhaps they are good and another part of the system is bad.

Sorry, can't give you much more than that.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Bob,

I'm in the Flint area, nearby Sloan.

I've been finding the fuses on ebay. After having seen the picture that Jim posted, that gave me the good info to search ebay. Good thing I've looked because there is more than 1 type (L1C, L2C, L3C) and there is bayonet or threaded type. I haven't put a bid on any yet until I can figure out the types I need.

Getting to the rear console fuse is a lot more difficult than the front dash. Right now my front dash just has a straight wire w/o fuse. That is what I inherited from the previous owner. I've had to replace the base part because the bottom clip (where the element touches) was rusty and could have easily shorted. The rear has the blown fuse intact.

I don't plan on using the lighters either, but just want them to work for other gizmo's. I have cleaned and tested the elements on the bench using my lawn tractor battery... I also don't want the drama of fried electrical wires. I found some other wires that someone in the past hacked with a knife dozens of times. Not good.

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There was a long ago post on this subject that said old cigarette lighters were one of the largest contributors to interior fires in old cars. If your wiring is original I would not take the chance on using them and when I did my 63 I deleted the wiring to both of them. Just my $.02.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Based on the address, sounds like our old friend Randy Rymal.

DANGER! DANGER! WARNING, Will Robinson!

Run away! Run away!

Too many people have had bad experiences with this guy for me to recommend him to anyone in the ROA. He has been banned from advertising in the Riview due to customer complaints.

Edited by Jim_Cannon
typo (see edit history)
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Oh..... he said his name is Dan Jackson....

OK, well then proceed cautiously...

I have heard that Randy was using a friend's eBay store at one time because of all of the negative feedback he obtained under his own ID.

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I'm repeating myself but there is another way to fix the lighter fuse. Wire in an in-line 30 amp fuse from the auto parts store. Just make sure to insulate the positive connector at the positive terminal at the base of the lighter so that it won't touch the lighter ground. Easy, inexpensive and it works.

Something to think about.

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I'm repeating myself but there is another way to fix the lighter fuse. Wire in an in-line 30 amp fuse from the auto parts store. Just make sure to insulate the positive connector at the positive terminal at the base of the lighter so that it won't touch the lighter ground. Easy, inexpensive and it works.

Something to think about.

Pictures, I'm with the inline fuse part but since the original fuse sounds like it's part of the base of the lighter I'm not seeing how you're getting past that.

Thanks,

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The fuse unscrews and leaves a center post (with threads) surrounded by a outer round metal shell that is common (ground).

I can't show a picture as I've reinstalled the center console. But I did find some left over parts and can help step you through the process.

FIRST THING - DISCONNECT THE BATTERY

First remover the fuse, it should unscrew and the fuse is not repairable.

Referring to the picture (and keep in mind this is a junk part that would need the terminals cleaned) you will see a brass post (the fuse has already been unscrewed). This post is the positive post. Take the part to the hardware store and find a nut and lock washer that will fit the post. The round "eye" connector will fit over the post but needs to be bent 90 degrees so that the sides will not contact the rim / ground (think L shaped). Use the smallest eye connector that will fit the post to avoid contact to the sides. I recommend you solder the eye connector to the lead wire lead on the in-line fuse (an example shown in the picture - 30 amp if you want to actually use the cigar lighter) vs just crimping as you will get a better and more dependable connection. Also recommend you get some shrink tubing to provide additional insulation around the bear metal of the L part of the eye connector - again to make sure the live wire does not contact the sides or you will blow your in-line fuse. Next you connect the eye to the post with the nut and lock washer.

Finally CUT the wire close to the fuse connector so you have plenty of wire with which to work.

Solder the other end of the in-line fuse to the power line you just cut (this is live so first disconnect the battery).

As long as your are doing all this make sure you have a new lighter element (auto parts store). Power up/reconnect the battery and test the lighter. Make sure it "pops out" as I once had a lighter stick and get VERY hot.

It's really pretty easy if you have wire cutters, soldering iron and are comfortable with the repair.

post-57537-143138205909_thumb.jpg

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