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Paint Color Matching


Vila

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Several questions about British Racing Green and the Auto Color Library website at: http://www.tcpglobal.com/autocolorlibrary/

First, I am restoring a British Racing Green 1962 Triumph TR4 and have heard the BRG color changed slightly between 1962 and 1963 TR4s. Can anyone verify this?

It is amazing how many shades of BRG I have seen on restored TR4s. I have seen some like my car's color which is a Green Green , then I have seen grayish green, and also yellowish green. All convinced they are BRG, which they could well be but I would like a match to the original for my car.

I am looking into buying PPG paint from the Auto Color Library website. Their Triumph paint chips only go back to 1963 and the Ditzler color chip sheet for Triumphs covers 1963 - 65. The BRG listed for those years is Ditzler code 42487 and it is difficult to tell exactly what shade of green it is from the small sample on the website.

My car has had one respray years ago that appears to be an exact match to the hidden panels that still have the original paint.

The Auto Color Library people said I could send a small part like the fresh air intake cover and they could match the color. Anyone have experience with their ability to accomplish color matching?

Anyone have comments on dealing with the Auto Color Library in general?

Vila

Visit my website at: http://mysite.verizon.net/vze114b79/

1933 Chevrolet

1962 Triumph TR4

1984 BMW 633 CSi

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PPG has a machine that reads the color and supplies a matching color/formula to mix the paint.

I have used the Dupont machine with varying success. Some matches are perfect, some are unusable.

Even the way the paint is sprayed will change the color. High air pressure will lighten it, low will make it too dark in some paints. Temp. and/or the wrong reducer will also alter some colors.

I painted a fender on a Toyota once using 4 different brands of paints and was unable to correctly match the color. I then resorted to the little bottle of touch up paint by Toyota that was in the trunk and it matched perfectly.

Lots of Luck!

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If you have a clean sample of the shade you want you can take to most any good paint shop that serves auto body shops and they can computer scan the sample and match it in whatever type paint you desire. It's pretty commonly done.

Does that mean your sample is the "correct" or definative shade. No it doesn't, because you will find as many folks as you want who will claim thier shade is the correct one.

Pick the shade you think you would like, have a pint mixed up and test spray a sample panel. If you like it declare it "original" and enjoy your choice and car...........Bob

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Many of the Durant Motors Automobile Club have used the Auto Color Library/TCP Global people to match and provide the correct color for our cars that were manufactured in the 20's and 30's. Everyone that I've spoken to have had good compliments about their matching service and their products.

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I just posted this on your question in the British car forum:

Color matching a paint is not an exact science, although some body shops are convinced that their machine is infallible. Therefore you need to look for someone skilled at doing it, not just "trained". I had a metallic blue matched perfectly once by a true craftsman, and he took 7 or 8 shots at gettng the mix right after the computer came up with it's solution (which wasn't "grey" enough). When he was done you could NOT tell where he painted and where he didn't.

As far as the "correct" color, there are a number of originaltiy guides for TRs that you can use, Bill Piggot's book ( Amazon.com: Collector's Originality Guide Triumph TR2 TR3 TR4 TR5 TR6 TR7 TR8 (9780760335765): Bill Piggott, Simon Clay: Books ) being the most prominent. According to it "British Racing Green" was available only through January 1963 (Commission # CT19518). After that date it was replaced with "Triumph Racing Green", also known as "Conifer Green". Apparently the change came part way throught the 1963 model year.

If you need more information, you can try contacting the Vintage Triumph Register. They have vehicle consultants for every model, the TR4 covered by Arthur Kelly. His contact information can be found on their web site ( VTR - Vehicle Consultants ).

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I also posted this:

You can also find period color paint samples from various manufacturers (and Standard-Triumph, although they're a little tougher) from numerous autoliterature dealers. You may have to buy a set of "Foreign Cars" colors instead of a Triumph-specific sheet/set, however.

If you don't have a good original paint to match, a paint chip from 1962 from a major manufacturer would be your second best bet. A good place to look for unfaded original paint on a TR is behind and under the dashboard.:cool:

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Any auto paint company should have the formula on file. All you need is the original number, code, or name of the color.

The local auto parts store may have to get the formula from the head office but they should be able to get it overnight.

Just call your local paint dealer. If they are up on the old cars they will know about this, if they aren't hip you may have to try another dealer.

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"Any auto paint company should have the formula on file. All you need is the original number, code, or name of the color."

Not always correct, My 55 Chrysler color could not be mixed any more as it originally came in Enamel or Lacquer. Neither are available any more from Dupont even if you wanted to use those ancient paints.

Many formulas can not be mixed in today’s paints as the pigments are different and can not be blended to make the old colors

Edited by R Walling (see edit history)
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Guest bkazmer

"matching on the computer" actually means getting a reading on a single angle spectrophotometer and having a match proposed from a combination of the pigments that that paint company wants to use. Same as wall paint at Lowe's.

It doesn't measure how paint "travels" (changes with viewing angle or illumination). It doesn't do metallic colors well at all (the metal flakes scatter the light beam). It doesn't choose the best pigments.

so take as part of the story, not the whole story

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