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Early engine 2 cylinder to identify


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Except for the flywheel this looks very similar to a Mason two cylinder. I think the engine is upside down because of the water manifolds, the push rods and oiler would be on top. The flywheel does not appear to have a clutch in it.

Could this engine be for some industrial use like a cement mixer or lift?

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Hi Green Dragon- it's on a piece of a frame, just for curiousity, what makes you think it's industrial such as a cement mixer? Interesting response. thanks David

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Hi David,

Could you get a couple more shots of the intake. timer tower, valve stuff?

Is it coupled to a planetary transmission? I also have an odd ball engine, similar but no cigar as to a match. What is the engine covered with? Can you tell? I am also curious as to what you have in the picture.

Regards, Alan

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A friend found this engine, no it's not for sale, but we'd like to know what it is. Thinking is it looks somewhat Buickish. Any ideas? thanks

Sure looks like a Buick to me.

Don P.

1906 F

Spokane, WA

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It would be good to know the bore and stroke, maybe later huh. I do think it may be an aftermarket variety that was sold to repower early cars or for industrial/stationary use. Please describe the clutch or trans that is hanging off the drive side of the engine. Just a guess but maybe a 4" x 4" and probably about 10-12 HP.

Al

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I looked though my "Golden age of Buick" book yesterday, And one of the first ads is for a Buick motor with the valve train from underneath. Adverised as "A motor that you will have success with." Similar but with some differences. The later engines have the valve train on the top. I also looked at some of the early farm tractor engines that had this basic design, but the ones I could think of all have solid flywheels. I Also thought it may be up side down. Dandy Dave!

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Thanks for all the replies. If I can get more info and pictures will let you know, he's dragging it out of the field and will have it home to play with. thanks dc

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I don't think this is a Mason engine but very similar. I still think this engine is upside down. The water pump drives off the end of the crankshaft and the blocks mount under the frame with four bolts going through frame cross members. The valve push rods are on top along with the oiler and magneto. What makes me believe this might be an industrial engine is the lack of visible clutch and what appears to be a brake outside of the planetary transmission.

RHL

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  • 2 weeks later...

If it's a Buick, the high speed clutch will be inside that housing, outboard of the planetary transmission, and not next to the flywheel. That may be where the clutch is, even if it's not a Buick. That was a fairly common layout; the one-lung Cadillac engines had the clutch there, too.

Gil Fitzhugh, Morristown, NJ

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