Roger Zimmermann

Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

Recommended Posts

Except for this sentence, I am totally speechless over the incredible detail on the car.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, keiser31 said:

I am totally speechless over the incredible detail on the car.

 

Keiser31, you are not the only one. Nearly every post from Roger just amazes me, the detail is just unbelievable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Mike!

It seems that I forgot to write that the lower part of the gas tank is removed. This is the reason why the tank on the picture is strange looking. Plus, the remaining part is not centered on the underbody. It's that way because I have to continue the electrical job.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, keiser31 said:

Except for this sentence, I am totally speechless over the incredible detail on the car.

THIS sentence.

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

With the trunk space free from wires, it's time to put some trim to hide the body work (in my case, not to protect it!). I still had some thin felt I used in the Avanti trunk. To be more authentic, this material should not be black but dark grey as some pictures I did in 1966 or 67 are showing it.

From my 3 scale models, the Toronado will be the sole one to have a full size tire/wheel stored. The wheel well's inside diameter from the Avanti is too small to accept the tire; the wheel well from the Mark II is not deep enough or the tire has a too large diameter; I had to remove some rubber at the bottom to store the wheel.

How is the spare wheel stored? Should the inner side be towards the rear or to the front? The owner's manual in the background was a nice help to solve that problem: the spare wheel is stored the same way my picture is showing it. Anyway, in a case of a flat tire, to extract that spare wheel from it's position must not be very convenient!

74 Trimmed trunk.JPG

Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

Anyway, in a case of a flat tire, to extract that spare wheel from it's position must not be very convenient!

LoL. Not much different today! Our spares are under floor so ...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Spinneyhill said:

LoL. Not much different today! Our spares are under floor so ...

Sure, but it's not so far away from the rear bumper. In the case of the Toronado and/or Eldorado, the spare is more than 1 meter away from the bumper, and heavy on top of that!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The spare wheel had to be secured in the trunk compartment. From the owner’s manual, I did a bracket, a strut which is anchored at the channel under both “Y” and a nut. From my old pictures, there is a cardboard on both sides of that structure. There is nothing in the middle; the spare wheel is hiding the view to the seat back’s construction. For a luxury coupe, the trim in the trunk compartment was minimalist compared to what is done now on most cars.

75 secured wheel.JPG

76 from inside.JPG

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Many a car had the spare 'relocated' wherever you could squeeze it in. I had several, and my friends had many more. The the spare was taking up the trunk and the luggage resided in whatever room remained. Change of tire sizes to the more modern 'fat' treaded tires was responsible often, so the thing would not fit into the well. But we got along as best we could. Ahhh, for the old days. 

So, Roger, you can just toss those spares in there any ol' way you like, and I'd swear that you are authentic, even if not like factory fresh. Nice work you are doing- retrofitting these things must be  a special talent you have.

Edited by Pat Hollingsworth (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pat, the spare tire in the model is at the same place the original spare is installed, see the attached page from the owner's manual.

From the manual.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Roger, that was intended to be a humorous posting. Sorry if it flunked the test. What I was saying was, in time lots of the spares ended up in any place other than the original well. That it would have been 'period correct' even if not factory. I'll not try humor further. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The world would truly be a boring place if everyone who "laid and egg" while trying to be humorous never tried again!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, Pat, humoristic posting is sometimes difficult to understand when one is speaking a different language. Unless it's really a plain joke, I hardly take a chance to write something humoristic, I'm lacking the finesse of English. As I published the pertaining document, it's the proof I completely misunderstood your comment!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just think it is great that somebody like you can write posts in another language. It would be impossible for me. Unfortunately, when I was at school, here in the UK, we only learnt two languages, good English and bad English. The good English we leant in class and the bad English we learnt in the playground! Please keep up your excellent posts.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As the trunk’s inside is done, I found it was the time to install the lid. Only 4 screws and it’s done. Really? Well, I went just a hair away from the catastrophe: Since I did the paint many years ago, I had to slam the trunk lid to close it. I expected the same after the lid installation. It was, but I had to slam the lid much stronger. I did various experiments to improve the issue, all failed. The last slamming was almost fatal: I could no more open it: the “key”, in fact a screwdriver, went to the maximum rotation but the lid stayed closed. Trying to open it with a lot of force stayed without result.  However, after a while, by lifting one end of the lid, the lid disengaged itself from the lock, without damage other than my ego. It was obvious that I had to remove the lock to see what’s wrong. Of course, I had to undo the trim near the lock…and I had to remember how, years ago, I installed the lock into the body. When it was out of the car, I opened it and saw nothing wrong. But, what is that small shiny bit of chromed metal lying on the desk? The first picture is showing the inside of the lock, without the cam.

The lock is functioning that way: a cam, operated by the key, is pushing the detent lever. Obviously, I removed too much metal to that lever when I did the lock in the past century and, to save the detent lever, I soft soldered a very thin bit of brass. The bond decided to strike and the cam had no effect anymore. With a new detent lever, that misshapen is now solved. I also had to elongate the holes in the body to position the lock assembly higher. I can now close the lid without to slam it. The last image is the “new” lock, with some grease to lube it.

 

 

78 serrure.JPG

79 repaired lock.JPG

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Door and trunk lid locks can be a problem on full size cars. I just can't imagine trying to adjust them on a scale model. My hat comes off to you Roger for your perseverance and expertise.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Mike! Indeed, on this model, it was the first time I attempted to scale down locks. The ones for the doors are as perfect as it can be at this scale, they are functioning as intended, with 2 stages like a real one. The trunk lock is not so perfect. Retrospectively, when it failed last week, I should have it completely redesigned. Indeed, I "just" did what was necessary for a correct function, but it's not my best.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As the trim in the trunk is ready, I think it would be time to go into the passenger compartment. As the carpet was destroyed when I began this overhaul, a new one must be done with velvet, as usual. I first covered the floor with paper, cutting the excess to have a pattern to cut the velvet. I did it in one piece; I saw later from my pictures that originally I did it in 2 pieces. The main concern with that carpet is to cut away as exactly as possible the indentation which will be occupied by the chrome/rubber trim under the driver’s feet.

This time, I used a not too strong glue in case the carpet must be removed in a distant future!

With the carpet installed, I could assemble the side arm rests in the back as well as the fillers between the side trim and seat back. Those fillers are attached to the side panel with two screws, but they can only be installed when the side panel is secured to the body. The last picture is showing that detail.

80 Carpet is back.JPG

81 trim detail.JPG

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I still am amazed that anybody can work to such fine detail at this small scale. Wonderful work, keep your excellent posts coming, I look forward to every post.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Installed the front bumper back. Not quite easy because I have no captive nuts inside the frame. Instead, I silver soldered studs on 4 plates. To secure the bumper, I glued first a bit brass to both rear most plates and inserted that assembly in the frame’s channel and searched for the hole. When I found it, I pushed on that assembly to let emerge the stud and put the nut on it. Then I did the same with the front place using the same procedure.

83 Installed front bumper.JPG

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The clamps are now added to the upper radiator hose; it was time after so many years without them!

I had a look at the hood lock; I cannot resist showing it to you, with the lock itself on the passenger side and the security catch on the driver side. Both are released by pulling the catch lever through the bumper aperture, like the original.

Before the hood can be installed, I will sand and buff it to remove the orange peel. I did this treatment to most of the body. The orange peel can be clearly seen on the attached older picture.

84 hood lock.JPG

85 Hood lock.JPG

86 clamps added.JPG

DSC02042.JPG

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 The orange peel can be clearly seen on the attached older picture.

 

Well I can't see it!

 

The lock, as are your models, I find difficult to comprehend that these are scale models and not real cars! Wonderful work.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Mike Macartney said:


Well I can't see it!

 

Either you have to put glasses or take stronger ones!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...