Roger Zimmermann

Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

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I'm sure I speak for all us of here when I say we're lucky you found those pictures!!   Very interesting to see the different method you took in making the bodies.  Amazing amount of detailed preserved in the negative mold and then to the parts... impressive.  Incredible really. 

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Indeed. It is interesting to see the different modelling techniques when using fibreglass.

 

Nice work and good write-ups. We are all looking forward to the next one!

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On the pictures, it seems that the details were finely reproduced. If I'm remembering well, there was a lot of rework: the plaster buck was too approximately done and a lot of bubbles were distributed through the polyester/fiberglass. This material is not kind at all with files and dentist mills!

Once the LH door was ready, I put it on the car and began to solder the previously separated wires. A test was done when each pair of wires was soldered. It was a good move: for an unknown reason, some buttons let the window down when up was desired. At the end, they all work the way they should; I’m wondering what for a gremlin I introduced!

The wires were next covered with the cover filler and the kick panel was installed. The next problem came when I wanted to install the light switch to the dash frame: the wiring coming from the front end has an insufficient slack to allow pulling the switch towards the back. The sole possibility was to remove the front end panel, motor and end travel switch. Before I’m installing the whole parts, I will test if the electrical circuit is still OK.

55 hidden wires.JPG

58 Dash.JPG

56 front end.JPG

57 front end.JPG

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Yes, they can make themselves very difficult to find. Here's hoping you will have no more Gremlins or Snags on your projects.

 

I am still finding your work fascinating and amazing.

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Fortunately, I found the wiring diagram I did in 1980 for the motor actuating the headlamp/ headlamps and tail lamps.  I intended at that time to let run the motor for the headlamps with 2V and the lamps (in serie) with 6V! Why do simple when you can do complicated?  

Indeed, I will do 2 separate circuits: one for the engine with 6V with its distinct connector at the fuel tank (like I did for the Mark II) and a connector hidden into the trunk for 3V. This will power everything except the traction motor. Of course, I have now to modify the way each separate bulb is fed; they will all get 1.5V; therefore there will always be a group of 2 fed in serie: 3 groups in the trunk for the tail lamps, 1 group each for the headlamps and one group for the parking lamps.

There is a reason why I’m separating completely the circuits for the traction motor and the other electrical devices: if all would be connected with 6V with the corresponding voltage reducer for the window motors, the traction motor would be absorbing current without turning. To let it run, I have to “give gas” by pushing the accelerator; then, when the accelerator pedal is released, the engine is idling (but it does not start in this position) and I could demonstrate that the windows are going up and down (maybe!). However this situation does not please me.

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Like we say, there's more than one way to skin a cat. Sometimes. But, I sure enjoy reading of the thought process you use to decide what way to do that skinning. And, Roger, we are all pretty certain that you will adopt the most useful one in the end. The sheer amount of problem solving you have undertaken in the construction of your models is astounding. I boggles my mind to think that  you restored full size autos and held a job, along with conducting your life as well. Quite the fellow, we think. Thanks for allowing me, and the rest, to tag along with you. Pat

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Thanks for your comments, Pat! However, as you can read below, I'm not sure if I choose always the better solution! Anyway, as you stated, i was busy most of my life!

 

What was I thinking when I began this model in the sixties? I found notes about brake light and I remember doing a functional directional signal lever. The fact is that I installed tiny bulbs at the back together with larger ones. I did also a strange electrical circuit with a 6V wire connected to a derivation box and from that box, a wire going into the trunk. For what purpose? Brake lights? It could be. Anyway, there is no brake switch at the brake pedal and I have no intention to do one. I removed that wire and the black wires which were connected to the large bulbs are now cut because I have no idea where they are ending towards the front of the model. And, of course, there is no documentation.

I rewired the small tail bulbs as I explained previously and did a functional test. 2 bulbs were hardly lit when current was applied. If all bulbs would be connected in parallel, there would hardly be a difference. But with 2 bulbs in serie, if the internal resistance is not near the same, the brightness of each bulb is considerably different. I had to match at least two bulbs to have an acceptable result. If I remember well, some bulbs have a resistance of 8 Ohm and other near 10 Ohms.

Now, the back is ready, I can go to the front and find how the system should be functioning.

As you can see, the end panel was made with brass, like the gutter for the trunk. The license plate is of course installed on hinges.

59 Back end.JPG

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