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Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12


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Hi Don! Nice to see you here...I don't remember what I had as vacuum with my China pump. It should be around 26 or 27", but I'm at about 1400' above sea level; I did not go to the sea to check the output! Anyway, enough vacuum to have a bubble free rubber mix!

Your method to put pressure at what ever product you are preparing is  interesting; however I don't intend to buy a pressure tank...It can be that you are using this system at your job.

Usually, I'm doing "copy/paste" to the various forums I'm showing my adventures. Of course, with the comments/questions, there can be one more picture to explain someting. However, as a general rule, the initial content is the same.

Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)
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The luggage rack must now be attached to the frame. There are two supports attached to the frame (the fuel tank cover is indeed between the frame and the supports; it’s not yet done) and an hinge is attached to the first smaller part of the rack. I have numerous pictures from both parts but all were shot in perspective, therefore it’s difficult to calculate the dimensions. Those small pieces are also difficult to fabricate as, as castings, they are irregular in shape and can mostly only held with the fingers to be worked. And, when they are ready, they are slippery!

All the brackets from the rack are attached with oval heads; I went recently to a store selling watch’s screws; I found none suitable for my needs, therefore I will have to make them. Fortunately, I found a 0.8mm die. Easy model? Nope!

Oh! The rod between both hinges is a temporary solution. Easier than with screws and nuts!

578 Rack hinge.JPG

579 Rack on frame.JPG

Edited by Roger Zimmermann
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The first tread I tried to do with the new die was a flop: it snaps off during the work...I had to drill what was into the die and patiently could remove the remaining brass…The second try was better: I used a slightly small diameter and used lubricant.

This “success” allowed me to do both pivots for the rack hinges; in between, I had made the hinges which are connecting both halves from the luggage rack.

The next tricky job was to drill the holes into the rack elements for the hinges. Those parts are now assembled but with the wrong screws; I have to make them; the head is the oval one.

The next task will not be easy: doing the rod supporting the rear half from the rack. If the luggage rack should not be stored when not in use, there would be no problem. But, with the movement needed to store the rack, the rod’s length and its pivoting point at the rack will be found with trial and an adjustable rod. When both variables are found, then I can do the definitive rods and drill the rear rack.

Confused by my explication? Thre will be soon pictures from that.

580 Hinge.JPG

581 rack on frame.JPG

582 almost ready.JPG

583 When not in use.JPG

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Getting the rod's length and its position on the rack was easier as expected. The pictures show how I did it. The pivot point is glued on the rack and could be moved if necessary; it appears that it's almost at the same position than on the real car, it must be just luck!
Now I can do the real parts.

584 Rack extended.JPG

585 Stored rack.JPG

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Roger,

 

Excellent work as always! 

 

I noticed some small "Rub Strips" on the flats of the rack, I assume that those will be glued on after painting? I can't even guess their dimension. Maybe Stainless Steel wire? or cut lengths from sewing needles? Flattened on one side of course.

 

Your "Casting" of the rear leaf spring mount looks so good! I laugh at myself when viewing your posts, under my breath, I hear myself saying "Oh look at that! Look at that! Hay? When did he do that? Oooh, look at that! . . ."

 

Have a great weekend!

 

Don

 

 

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Me again. If you know the dimension for those strips, Hypodermic tube stock is available from one of my suppliers, and despite the fine diameters, it is very ridged. And in the smallest sizes, the hole at the ends are so small as to not even be seen, or easily filled with solder, or material of your choice.

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Don, thanks for your comments! Regarding the strips...I'm not sure how to do them. My initial idea is to use a 0.6mm rod, flattened on one side. Maybe small pins to locate them, but this is the "luxury" version. Glue is maybe more efficient; anyway, there will never be much luggage on that rack or, as you can see on pictures some pages back, I could do the coffer like it's installed on the car from Alex D. Most probably, it will be place in the position "not in use".

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Dang Roger,

 

The luggage rack look just like the 1:1 version ! !  The "casting" for the frame mount is just amazing that you got that detail so accurate (from the pictures of the full sized rack) and the way it folds up is just incredible. 

 

Amazing !  After following your threads from the Continental (so many years ago), there seems to be NOTHING that you cannot duplicate. (Except for a minature man (1:12) to drive the Cadillac).  Maybe you can find a 1:12 doll and Christina can fashion him a suiteable suit of clothes and a tiny tophat and he can sit behind the wheel?   🙂

 

Your work astounds us all.  Just beautiful and precise.  Every thread you post, the Cadillac is really becoming a car.  Now that the chassis is near completion, I can't wait to see you fabricating the body. 

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Randy, there are sometimes things I cannot replicate, at least not with the tools I have. The radiator grille is an example; I still don't know "how to". I will probably need some exterir help, but that's far away. 

I have to say that I'm really satisfied how my "casings" for the frame are looking. Some were not easy to do, but, once ready, the difficulties are something from the past!

Forget about a miniature driver and clothing for him!

 

The luggage rack is structurally ready. There are however garnish elements which must be done: the molding around both grilles and the slats over the painted surface (to protect it). Plus some screws which are specific for that application with an oval head. Thanks to the 0.8 mm die I bought recently, I will be able to do them. Fortunately, the forces applied to the screws are not important: the finished diameter from the tread is about 0.73 mm; the nuts screwed on this smaller diameter is giving the feeling that the tread could be stripped easily. Its an understanding to say that I’m not really satisfied with this die.

Finally, I may use the treaded portion from the bolts I have and modify the 6-pan head to have the oval one.  

 

A remark for Don: the strips should be 0.7 mm wide (.028"). That's wide enough to insert pins, having that way a positive positioning on the grilles. The pins will also help attaching the parts to the tree for plating.

586 luggage rack.JPG

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Hello Roger,

 

I know I have said it before, and I know that you agree with me, "I am so glad you have continued to work as a modeler and did not retire with the completion of the Continental."  

 

As for the small strips, why I was suggesting the hypodermic tubing?  -is because of the rigidity and straightness.  Small straight lines of "chromi-ness" must be absolutely straight, in the way that you will be using them. (Parallel too) Being so close to all the straight edges created in the trunk rack. 

 

I think gluing will be easier, since any pierced holes would have to be smaller or maybe the same diameter as the strips, and exactly on spot.  -"Glue" could be whatever clear coat you're using. Not necessarily "glue." Two knife scribed lines in the final paint, could be enough to aide placement, two lines parallel to each other and no wider than the strip itself.

 

Enough student / master talk. 

 

I really am continually drawn into the photos of your work.  Some things we appreciate for their simplicity, and some things we love for their depth of detail, and accomplishment!

 

Your biggest fan in Long Beach! Don.

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Don, thanks for your comments! On purpose, I did not answer because I wanted first to see if the process I was thinking at was possible. See below!

 

If you are looking back at the V-16 luggage rack’s picture I published some time ago, you’ll notice “rub strips” on the grilles. How could I do them?

I calculated that the strips or moldings are 0.7 mm wide. If all is going the way I want, I could drill two holes @ 0.5 mm into a 0.7 mm rod, insert wires and solder them. Those two wires per molding have a dual purpose: I can use them for the tree which will go to the plater (when?) and provide a positive location for the strips on the grilles. Fine, but how to do that?

As the rods have to be flattened on one side. I milled a groove into a scrap bit of brass. Each rod was glued into the groove with contact cement. The bond was strong enough to rework the rod and then, that assembly went in a wise to drill the holes. For each hole, I had to verify if the position was right, because the hole has to be exactly in the middle of the rod. For each hole, I had to adjust the position by 0.02 or 0.03 mm (0.0008 to 0.001”) as my machine is no very rigid. The rod was then removed from the jig using paint thinner.

Then, I silver soldered the pins and did the necessary rework at the rods.

Now, I have to drill the grilles for the moldings…

 

587 jig.JPG

588 flattened rod.JPG

589 drilling the holes.JPG

590 Moldings are ready.JPG

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The grilles were drilled to accepts the strips or moldings. I noticed that on the larger grille, the middle strips are too short! Obviously, I did an error during the calculation. I will redo the two, because the look is not what it should be. Once plated, the strips will be partially glued to avoid lifting.

The exterior moldings are also installed (they will be chromed too); the two moldings finishing the square from both grilles will be glued. The original ones have tiny screws; this method is too impractical to be applied on the model.

As you can see, the grille's paint suffered a lot during the rework...

591 luggage rack ready.JPG

592 luggage rack ready.JPG

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14 minutes ago, Mr. Don said:

When the time comes for plating, perhaps attaching those to a more substantial bar? to borrow it's strength?

 

Those look pretty delicate.

 

Excellent work Roger! 

Thanks Don!

Yes, they are rather delicate. It will be a challenge to polish them for plating. As you can imagine, I'll attach them on a tree with other parts, like I did for the Mark II.

816 second chrome batch.JPG

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When an element is finished, I have usually a hard time to decide “what next?”. As you can see, most of the frame and engine are more or less ready with the exception of vacuum and fuel lines. Those elements will be done just before the final assembly because they are rather delicate.

Anyway, I found something to do: the mud pan shelfs or splatch plates. Two factors were the reason I delayed as much as possible their construction: the lack of information and the louvres. I had four pictures, the most informative is shown here. Finally, the real dimensions are not that important: they must fit the frame and engine.

I did first the plates with cardboard to see how to place the louvres. That was the easy part.

I never did louvres, so it was for me something new. I intended to do a simple tool which ended to be more elaborate by necessity. The first try was successful, so I could continue on the real parts. I had to do three different punches; I began with the short one.

The tool had to be modified when switching from the LH to the RH part, and of course, both elements from the tool had to be adapted for a longer punch. Finally, the result is not so bad, but not perfect. If I had to do a hood with louvres, my tool should be much more refined to have the exact same dimension between louvres. Fortunately, the hood has doors, so no more louvres on this model!

To have the frame upside down, I used something I did for the Mark II.

The splatch plates are not completely finished, some details must be added, like 4 larger louvres at the front.

splash plate.JPG

593 supporting the frame.JPG

594 Mud pan shelf.JPG

595 Tool for louvres.JPG

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Hello Roger!

 

Very nice! 

 

Question, how thick is the sheet Brass? -and did you work in strips deforming the edges, or were you able to pierce the sheet while forming the louvers? I see some scoring lines. I'm always interested in your and other's techniques. And louvers are in my future. The model A has them, and Bugatti loved them!

 

Don

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32 minutes ago, stretch cab said:

Your work is amazing!  I enjoy seeing your progress each post.  Do you have a link to the finished Mark II?  I would love to see it.

Stretch, navigate to the beginning of this thread. You won’t be disappointed!

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Its been a wonderful year to enjoy, with your continuing series of wonderful metal fabrication and puzzle solving, Roger. It looks like more to come- even more masterfully, it seems. Thank you. And, to you, Roger, and all the others that frequent these posts, I wish you a Merry Christmas, and a wonderful, Happy New Year. 

Edited by Pat Hollingsworth (see edit history)
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@ Don: the brass punch is remaining rather sharp. I noticed the wider the louvre, the more accurate tools are needed; steel would certainly help. Obviously what I did was OK for the narrow louvres but not for the last ones.

@ Pat: thanks for the comments and enjoying what I'm doing! I hope that you will also see other things next year, but I still don't know what!

To all: Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)
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Those of us who know that you actually have a shrinking machine and that you make the parts full size and then shrink them are still impressed with the quality of the full size parts. ;)

 

Joking aside, we're blessed to have you and are thankful for your skill and dedication that looks like magic from afar!

 

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

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21 hours ago, keiser31 said:

Roger....seeing your progress on the car is like having Christmas each time! Merry Christmas to you and yours.

John and Cherrie

Thanks John! My wishes for a Merry Christmas is coming just in time, with a small report!

 

Some details were added to the mud plates. The four front louvres could not be done with my basic tooling; after many tries, I ended by soft soldering the elements which are forming the louvres. The plates are attached to the frame at the front with four legs; they were added.

I tried to drill one hole on the frame to attach one plate; the “construction” was too instable; I had to cancel the idea before the drill broke or the hole at the wrong place. I have to make the holes for the plates before the engine is removed: there are two studs screwed into the crankcase; they are giving the location for the plates. I will make a frame with wood to put the frame on it upside-down; this stable construction will allow to drill the necessary holes.

 

596 Splatch plates.JPG

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Roger And Christina,

 

Joyeux Noel et Bonne Annee.  And the main wish......a HEALTY HAPPY year to come !  Following you for the last 13 plus years, you have made all of us appreciate what an automotive engineer can add to this hobby.  Breaking down each step, contriving a way to duplicate the part in 1:12 scale, is boggling to the mind and a joy to watch.

 

For those of us who venture into modeling, you are the benchmark.  I ask myself.......now  how would Roger do this?  Exactness is a tough mistress to achieve in the world of 1:12 but you make it look simple, which is anything but! 

 

After you get the part finished and fitted to the chassis, it is hard to discern that this is a model and not full sized.  We all know better. So many hours of contemplation, trial and error go into each part. 

 

I favor the 30's cars as the "artists" were still at the drafting boards of the manufacturers.  J.R. Nethercutt summed it up best;  "These automobiles are rolling art!". This Cadillac will be a masterpiece to add to the Avanti, Toronado and the Continental. 

 

Bravo Roger.  Each new post is a delight.

 

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Thanks for the wishes, Randy! To all, have a Happy New Year, good health.

 

Indeed, there are still many details which are missing from the frame/engine, they will be done during the final assembly unless the parts must be chromed like most vacuum or fuel lines in the engine compartment, or the tubes between air cleaners and carbs. However, the enthusiasm to make them now is rather low…

The latest parts I found interesting were the exhaust tips. They were probably an accessory, the shape they have is well suited for the epoch, they would be out of place on a Tesla!

I had the impression that those tips were easy to do; they were not, mostly due to the transition between a tube and a triangular shape. Anyway, they are there, even installed on the chassis. I will have to shorten the exhaust tubes as the tips are ending way after the rear bumper.

For the moment, I don’t see other interesting parts to do; I will have to begin the firewall but I don’t have enough brass. And, of course, the local metal store is closed till next week!

Thanks to the pictures from Johan and Paul Ayres, I have time to do some planning…

 

 

597 Exhaust tips.JPG

598 Exhaust tips.JPG

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  • 2 weeks later...

Is this the body for the model, missing a hole on the roof for the driver’s head? No! It’s just a tool: with that assembly upside down, I will be able to do the holes for the splash plates and other holes if needed.

As I like to drink good wines, sometimes I’m buying some in a wood case. That wood is ideal to begin the fire in the chimney from our vacation house or to do some strange constructions!

599 strange tool.JPG

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Good Gosh!!!! Roger, you almost gave me a heart attack!!!

If you're going to joke around, preface it with "once upon a time", . . .  or "two modelers went into a bar, and the scratch-builder boasts that he never uses instructions, to which the kit-builder says, "me too!"

 

Something! -I'm not a young man!😁

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Don, it seems that you not really appreciate my joke!

It was time to use the tool as designed: with a strange position for the drilling module, I could do the holes for the splash plates, one after the other. As the plates are located by a stud each at the crankcase, I needed the engine installed on the frame do drill the remaining holes. That set-up is usually dangerous for the drill bits: after doing the last hole, the head from the drill press rotated (most holes were not perpendicular) without warning. The drill bit broke in several pieces; I found only some!

600 Strange set-up.JPG

601 Installed splash plates.JPG

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