Roger Zimmermann

Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

Recommended Posts

You are too kind! Some wires are missing (like on the Mark II, adding tem just creates a mess) and the clamps at the water hose are missing too. I will however add the  clamps. It will be like a general revision after 30 - 40 years!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Roger

I  am so glad to hear the saga continues. There are only so many good things to invest time on and I have enjoyed all the time spent reading and feeling your satisfaction in your accomplishment. Over 9 years on a build and never getting discouraged is the mark of excellence. Thank you for a wonderful build and thank you for sharing your journey. 

You are one of a kind.

Nelson 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, get those clamps on right away, or it'll lose the antifreeze. Nice picture of the engine, all right, but the one that got my attention was the door opening with the ''Body By Fisher" emblem on the scuff plate. How'd you do that back in the day? Neat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm another one of the guys that have been with you since the first post... you made 9 years goes by in a flash because each post was more amazing than the last.

Thanks for educating and wowing all of us with your talents, skill, patience, and humbleness... I've enjoyed every second of it!

I'm so looking forward to watching you bring some of your "older" models up to date!

 

~ Tom

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Pat Hollingsworth said:

... but the one that got my attention was the door opening with the ''Body By Fisher" emblem on the scuff plate. How'd you do that back in the day? Neat.

It was a picture. I most probably got a print of the negatives; that emblem was with the right dimensions...Unfortunately, it's now blass. As I'm doing a major job on this model (the report will come tomorrow), maybe I will let do decals.

 

@Tom: Thanks for the fidelity! In the next few month, you will have something to see with the Toronado!

Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Truly amazing work.  I would say that your car is worth as much or more than a 1:1 scale version.  I would also think, and hope, that 100 or 200 years from now, these pieces will be in the Louvre or The Henry Ford, or some other place of honor to be enjoyed by all next to all the other masterpieces.  I don't think anyone in the world could match this work.  Congratulations.

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As some wiring is lose in the trunk compartment, and the trim non-existent, I removed the trunk lid to facilitate the work. I noted that the torsion springs cannot held the lid open; I removed the rear grille and had a look at what I did a long time ago: the rods are similar to the ones from a real car. I could not remove them, but I was able to bend a leg, giving more upwards strength; it’s now enough to keep the lid wide open.

I then reassembled the master switch and had a good look at the small switch for the seat. After a while, I discovered a broken wire; no wonder the seat was not functioning!

I cannot solder the wire to the proper place as the space is not sufficient and the switch too near from the door/pillar. The dilemma was: do I let it that way, reassembling all or do I remove the wiring to repair the switch? When I’m at finishing something, it must function, therefore the decision came rather quickly: I’m repairing the switch, which is a major job: taking the carpet out. I knew that I could not rescue it, but boy, it was well, too well glued! While I’m at that, the quarter trim panels are coming out too because the switches are not functioning. I had no clue how the wiring would look like; I completely forgot how it was done. I will have to cut the wires going to the door, repair and reinstall and solder together the cut wires. I will use less material to keep the wires together; the vibrations are so few that its not necessary to attach them the way I did.

On top of that, the RH front window is more functioning! The motor is turning, but nothing is happening. Some more panels to remove!

Some good news: the switch for the headlamp is OK, but the LH lid for the headlamps is jamming and is staying closed. Something more to repair! I have the impression that this model is like a real car which was technically neglected: good looking but not reliable. And each repair leads to another one. Nice!

14 wiring.JPG

15 wiring.JPG

16 wiring.JPG

17 Trunk.JPG

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems this is like working on a real car... try to solve one problem and then need to take half the car apart! 

 

Could you get a couple of shots of the dash?  It looks amazing!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, it's exactly like that!

For the moment it's a mess. Here is an older one. Plus two from right now. I cannot put the camera into the car to have a good one!

Tableau avec flash.JPG

DSC00799.JPG

DSC00801.JPG

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Roger,

You got so many posts going I can't keep up.  I didn't go far enough back to see you had the Continental finished.  Man I'm really falling behind.  The Continental is just amazing and I applaud you on all the hard work you put into making it.  Truly a one of a kind piece.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Martin! Yes, since the model is finished, there were a lot of messages. To make things worse, I continue with the repair of another model!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After I cut some wires to take the window’s harness out, I noticed that it was not coming out easily. Once away from the car, I noticed that I was not able to insert a single wire into the model from the hole in the A pillar! It was at that time evident: the dash must out. But how? Fortunately, I kept the drawings I did during the construction. Unfortunately, they are imprecise; I just found an incomplete description how the dash was installed: the heater and A/C module at the dash was put last and was glued. Fortunately, the glue after so many years is no more very strong: with a plier, I could take the assembly out. Behind that, a screw is attaching the left instruments assembly. When this assembly was out, I saw more screws. But, how to remove the instruments from the right side? My brain had to make some overtime and something told me that one of the radio knobs is the key. But which one? The RH one would not turn but the LH did. And, effectively, the assembly is coming out!

After a while, I was convinced that the surround in leather must come out. I found the 3 screws but then, the steering column was in the way! It went out without too much trouble. However, the dash would not move a lot because of the light harness. Then, I saw that the light switch is attached with 2 screws; this allowed me to pull the dash.

Fortunately, all went without damage to the paint or plated parts. I can now move to the seat switch; I think I’m doing another one which should be better.

18 dash removed.JPG

19 dash frame.JPG

20 dash parts.JPG

Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, there is no link or whatever. I did that model between 1966 and 1980 (or later). What I'm showing here is the intend to finish it; indeed to repair and finish it. I have so few pictures on paper and it was done so many years ago, I cannot do a story like I did with the Mark II.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/27/2019 at 4:30 PM, Roger Zimmermann said:

No, there is no link or whatever. I did that model between 1966 and 1980 (or later). What I'm showing here is the intend to finish it; indeed to repair and finish it. I have so few pictures on paper and it was done so many years ago, I cannot do a story like I did with the Mark II.

 

I was born in 1966, the same year as Roger's Toronado.  I find this very pleasing. :)   This also means that both the Toronado and myself are classified as antiques!!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Luv2Wrench said:

 

I was born in 1966, the same year as Roger's Toronado.  I find this very pleasing. :)   This also means that both the Toronado and myself are classified as antiques!!

 

Ok, if you are an 'antique', what's that make me, born in 1946 - 'Stone Age'!! This morning, I do feel very old and ancient.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s now time for a small update. I’m “working” much slowly because I have no pressure!

When all the “furniture” was out, I tried to let run the electrical engine which should move the model. It is intended to run with 6 V but with my battery pack, I had nothing. The accelerator is connected to a variable resistance; I could see the wire moving with the pedal but I was unsure how the other side of the resistance to close the circuit. I removed another trim panel at the dash; the view to the resistance was marginally better, not more. There is a black heavy wire attached to the dash’s brass structure; it should be the wire I’m searching…By applying current to the black wire and the slider which is moved by the accelerator, the engine ran. To make it short, I had two days to understand what was wrong! I remember that I used a small transformer for electric trains, which I still have. I connected it to the motor and I had an idle and full power!

With that problem solved, I could have a look at the seat switch. I tried to rescue it, but I was not happy with the whole design. I did another one which may be better; the whole is now ready and assembled into the trim panel. I must wrap the wires with some tape and reinstall.

21 Switch assembly.JPG

22 Assembled switch.JPG

23 Trim panel.JPG

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Before I’m continuing with the wiring, I wanted to modify the seat adjusters. It could be that my seat was too narrow as the centerline of the adjusters does not line up with the seat base; the pedestals for the tracks were offset on the old system. I wanted to do similar adjusters to the ones from the Mark II, but due to this distance situation, I had to imagine something narrower. I’m more or less satisfied with the end result; it’s most of the time not easy to adapt something to an existing construction. I did a test with the motor and 1.5V; the seat is moving more or less with regularity. I hope that with 3V it will be better.

 

24 seat adjusters.JPG

25 seat adjusters.JPG

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Removing parts is most of the time more interesting than the restoration work because it goes so quickly! This is true with real cars and it does apply with this model too: as I know that the retractable headlamp system is not too reliable, the sole way to get at it is to remove grille and front bumper. I’m not sure if I will have to remove the front panel too, the future will tell it.

Now I have more and more parts removed; it could be the right time to begin some assembly!

 

 

26 removing the bumper.JPG

27 removed bumper.JPG

28 removed bumper.JPG

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎1‎/‎30‎/‎2019 at 8:27 AM, Roger Zimmermann said:

What should I say with my born date of 1945! However, sometimes still acting like a teenager (but somewhat slower)! 

I love your comments they do make me laugh out loud.

It's nice to see another post on your 'restoration/rebuild' of the Tornado. I still cannot get my head around working on such small things. I have never found it easy working on full size car components, like retractable headlights, let alone retractable headlights and electric seats that are 1:12 scale! I look forward to your following posts.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Roger,

I was just wondering how many miles are on the Tornado?  😎

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Roger....the more I see of the Toronado, the more I love it! The color is perfect. Another AWESOME job!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the comments, Mike, dale and keiser31. Humoristic comments never hurt!

An answer to Dale: the mileage? maximum 1 mile! But you know, it's the age. When a car is not used, all kind of trouble are coming!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...