Roger Zimmermann

Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

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Roger, I'd like to make some really nice compliments, but the guys are way ahead of me in stating what a neat job that trunk lid ended up being. From the first posts beginning this huge, beautiful project, until these ending ones the journey has matched the fabulous model. What a treat to have been around for much of it. You and it are both treasures. Thank you!

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9 hours ago, Luv2Wrench said:

Yeah, that really looks good and it only looks better after Spinneyhill's picture of a "real" Mark II.   I keep going back and forth between them and it is truly mind boggling... you'd think that *something* would be misplaced or not scaled correctly on the model... not so.  The 'L' is a nice detail... I would have placed it further down to the chrome bar, roughly in line with the 'C', instead it is a little higher up.  If you look at the "real" Mark II you'll notice that it is also a little higher up.   I guess that's the difference between aligning on centers and edges.  Great detail.

Ah! Jeff and the lying pictures! I measured the distance between the "C" and the "L" to the chrome bar this morning. Maybe at 0.1mm the distance is the same. The vertical part of the "L" is wide, giving the impression that the letter is further away from the chromed bar, because the thin horizontal element is hardly visible on the picture.

Thanks to all who take the time to answer and comment this construction.

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8 hours ago, keiser31 said:

Roger....I think your deck lid fits better than on the real car!

Mmmm...Not so sure!

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 I also keep going back and forth between the photos of the real car and your model. I have said it before - I find the skill and attention to detail at this scale is absolutely amazing. No wonder the Swiss are know for watch making!

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Roger,

I have been with this build from day one!  It has been an amazing ride!  You are quite the craftsman and have done what most people only dream of.  From the day you started this build with the tires it has been very exciting to see how you made each part and how detailed you were in recreating the Mark II, and your problem solving has been amazing.  I know you have had many sleepless nights designing in your head what were the next parts to make and how you would go about doing them.  Quite an amazing feat!

Again, WONDERFUL JOB!  And thanks for bringing us along to view.

Maybe this summer we could meet as my daughter and son-in-law are in Bern now on a 1 year job assignment and we may travel there to visit them.  Where in Switzerland are you?

Dale

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Thanks for the kind words, Dale. I'm glad this construction did entertain many people!

I'm living near Bienne, at about 20 miles from Bern. If you are in that region, you are welcome to visit me!

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I really took my time to put the letters on the hood! Like at the rear, I did a jig to help for the position of the letters. I glued some paper at the back of the guide but I remove it after the 3 first letters were glued. This time all went well without disappearing letter! I did also a method’s change: I put the glue at the back of each letter; at the rear, the glue was deposited on the paint with a toothpick; I could better control the glue quantity when it was at the back of each letter.

 

Technically, the model was finished on January 19, 2019, not quite 9 years after the beginning which was on February 3, 2010. I’m glad I survived all that time and I’m glad YOU survived too!

There will be better looking pictures when I can do them outside with a good light. Till then, well, it will be quieter. As I wrote some time ago, I have to finish the Toronado. If I can continue here with that finishing work, then my reports are not yet over. does it makes sense to relate my model's stories here or should I begin a new topic? What do you think? And what the moderators are thinking?

 

Thank you to all who followed and commented this adventure. It was a pleasure to read those messages; they helped also to continue that mad project!

 

I forgot something important to add: the final weight: front 1'686g, rear 1'798g for a total of 3'484g or 7.68 pounds. A real heavy weight! It's interesting to note that, despite the engine weight, the front axle is lighter than the rear one.

 

1069 Gluing the letters.JPG

1070 Completed.JPG

1071 Completed.JPG

1072 Completed.JPG

Edited by Roger Zimmermann
Weight added (see edit history)
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Wow Roger, that is amazing. I think we all can really appreciate your skill, attention to detail and tenacity to complete a project 9 years in the making! I wish that I had 1/10 of your knowledge and skill! The car is beautiful!  It's  sad to see this project end in a way but we can look forward to the work on the Avanti. Would there be any way to keep this thread active , other than continuing it, so it can be shared with others? Again, great work and thanks for sharing it!

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Thanks for your comments! I assume that the sole way to keep this thread active is to put new messages. Therefore I think it would make sense to continue here with the other adventures: there is that way only one thread dealing with scale models. Or, to make a comparison: unimogjohn and his thread "Avanti R2, 1963, refresh". The refreshing from the Avanti is long done, and he is telling his car's adventures on the same thread. By the way, I have about 1000 views more that John!

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Roger,

Feel free to continue posting about your other model in this same thread, or probably about anything else you want to share. I am sure that your friends here will be happy to continue following your adventures just like they are John's post Avanti work.

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What a fabulous journey you have taken us on. Thank you, Roger!

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Roger,  over the last nine years a lot has happened.  My kids went from ages 9, 11 and 13 to 18, 20 and 22... one can only imagine the highs and lows during that stretch!!   I bought one project (1913 Metz) and realized I needed a lot more capability to tackle it.  I've spent years trying to add those skills and tools.  I put it on hold and bought another easier project (1952 MG TD) and have enjoyed it.  During the whole time a constant has been your amazing progress.  Checking in on your progress has always pulled me back to the right state of mind... one that patience and perseverance are the keys to getting things done.  I'm thrilled that you've started the thread on the 1956 Cadillac Biarritz and look forward to the Avanti pictures here. 

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Roger, first of all, thank you for sharing your passion with all of us. The Mark 2 is remarkable. Your skills go way beyond the modeling  world. The Mark is a beautiful work of art. I have learned so much, from each and every post. Looking forward to seeing you restore the Cadillac. Thanks. John

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Wow, what a marvellous achievement!

 

Your readers may be sad, but that is purely selfish sadness that there are no more wonderful posts of tiny work well done on this model. I have smiled many times when you show a new part with a little explanation of how it was done and I marvel at your skills. 0.75 g per pound is pretty good too.

 

After the Toronado refurbishment, will you make a nice display cabinet with streetscape diorama to display your models?

 

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Roger,

It has been an inspiration to see you work on and complete your Mark II model. I took great interest in it as the Continental is one of my favorites and one of the best styled cars of the 1950's. Your persistence and perseverance in overcoming problems you encountered along the way was awe inspiring. The final result speaks for itself. It is stunning. Congratulations on a job well done. You are a craftsman's craftsman!

Sincerely,

Lew Bachman

1957 T-Bird

 

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I'm going to be waiting for the 'finish photos' of the model because I know they will be remarkable images. The continuing story of the Toronado, or anything else. is going to be interesting enough to make the wait pleasant. I always feel better when I come here and browse for a little while. Or, a long while. Carry on, we await your posts. 

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I must say that prior to this Continental model build, I was not a big fan of those cars. Thanks to Roger, I have grown to appreciate the fine automobiles that they are. Thank you, Roger!

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Hi all! I just can say thank you for al the recent comments. I should respond to each one; you will understand that I will do it that way. I'm just amazed how many people followed this construction since the begining and were not tired by the slow pace nor from the sometimes abstract posts.

Barry Wold had right: I will get here a large audience. Thanks again to all, but I will come back and maybe sooner as you are thinking! However, do not anticipate a large project: I wrote here what I'm intending to do next.

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On 1/20/2019 at 7:41 PM, Spinneyhill said:

After the Toronado refurbishment, will you make a nice display cabinet with streetscape diorama to display your models?

 

As this is a concise question, I have to answer it: no, I will not do that. It would require a huge space which I don't have and I have anyway no envy nor talent do do a scenery. Look, I'm way from perfect!

Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)

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Roger,

 

Regarding your faulting the model and yourself........................BUNK !   Never have I seen such a creation as what you have done here.  We know it is perfect as you would not skip or let a little "flaw" pass.  You would think on it then come back with the answer showing us how you accomplished the solution to the problem.  Now it is a MASTERPIECE.  What is left to do on the Continental now?  Are the windows in?  Plus, did you get the license plates made yet?  And the battery box.  Just a few items that I was thinking about.  

 

We all come to this site like "moths drawn to the candle".  We all want to see what you have done next.  It is a rewarding release after all the pressures of the day to sit down and open the site and follow this great story.  Do continue with the Tornado's work as we will all like to see what you do with it. 

 

What will be really amazing is to see the Continental in "low light" with the headlamps turned on and the tail lights and license plate lights burning.

 

You are the master !

 

Randy

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Randy, the model is complete. The windows are in, the "license" plate is on; I did recently a picture from the front with the lights on (the picture is somewhere here) and, to my dismay, there is no light for the license plate!

I'm now with the Toronado. There is here a lot to do as you will see later.

Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)

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Now that the Mark II is ready, I have to really finish the Toronado. Why did I not finish it many years ago? Probably because I was very busy with my real cars; anyway, the fact is that the electrical system was not finished and the seat was no more functioning.

In the seventies or eighties, a neighbors did for me a voltage reducer: the electrical motor for the traction is fed with 6V, but the motors for windows, seat and headlamps are fed with 2V. I had no idea if this device would still function, I never tried it.

During the break in January, I did a case for four 1.5V batteries (it could be that then I did not continue because I had no 6V source) similar to the one I did for the Mark II.

The first thing I did was to hook that voltage reducer and try if the windows would work. Nothing! However, the inside illumination was on, so I knew that the voltage reducer was active.

As I had nothing to lose, I tried with 3V. The LH window came up, but with a high pitch noise! The RH window came up and down without noise, but very slowly. The quarter windows were OK too, but much slower than I had in memory. The seat would not move and the headlamps would not come up.

The first work was to open the LH door and remove the motor.  In retrospect, I did a very good job as everything is attached with screws. Once the motor was out, I separated the motor from the reduction gear and let it run with 1.5V. I had then the confirmation that the vibration came from the motor and not from the reduction! I put some oil at the output shaft, without difference. The back is closed; I tried anyway to put a drop of oil on it. I assume that the capillarity from the construction let some oil come at the right place as with the time, the motor went to a quiet mode.

It’s now back in place, without noise. With 1.5V, it barely goes up and down when connecting the battery directly to the motor. Therefore, I tried again with 3V; it goes somewhat quicker, but you can almost get asleep in between. That’s a design flaw: to improve the situation, I should use the same motors as the ones from the Mark II; this would require heavy modifications at the doors because the transmission (or reduction gear) is square.

To understand what was happening and continue the electrical work, I had to remove the rear seat. I discovered the electrical mess under it; if I have the schematic of the system, I don’t have identified the wires with the proper color, so I’m lost. There will be some detective work to find out.

As some elements covered with leather were out, I cleaned them with a leather product. Despite the age (about 40 years old), they are in good shape; I must add that the mileage is maybe 10 yards!

1 door inside.JPG

 

 

4 window motor.JPG

5 assembled motor.JPG

2 rear wiring.JPG

3 trim.JPG

Edited by Roger Zimmermann
Pictures added (see edit history)
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As I had no motion with the switches, I had to assume that it was some oxidation there or worse, an open circuit. Again, everything is assembled with screws; I could remove the knobs to have a good view at the contacts. If the moving parts from the contacts were made with gold to avoid the oxidation, the pins were just brass and, indeed, they are black. A light cleaning was done as good as I could because, unfortunately, the switch base cannot be removed from the wiring. I will add some contact grease.

When I was doing the switches for the Mark II, I wanted to see how I did the switches for the Toronado. I had unfortunately not the courage to remove all the parts attached with screws. It’s  a pity because the master switch is almost a miniaturisation marvel and the way I did the insulation at the knobs was fantastic: I let first the knobs to be chromed and then I did the necessary insulation with 2K body filler! Easy, not a lot of machining and effective.

I removed also the motor from the seat; fortunately, it’s not dead, it’s turning well with 1.5V. However, the seat’s tracks, a rod into a tube, was prone to jam. I will redo the tracks the way I did them for the Avanti and Mark II. The system itself with the string will stay because the mechanism I did for the Mark II could not be used here due to a lack of space. Cars were getting lower in the sixties!

 

In between, I removed the hood because the mobile headlamps may require further disassembly.

 

6 master switch.JPG

7 master switch.JPG

8 master and seat switch.JPG

9 knobs.JPG

10 seat frame.JPG

11 back of frame.JPG

13 seat track.JPG

12 engine view.JPG

Edited by Roger Zimmermann
Adding text and picture (see edit history)
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There is actually no way to tell if that last photo is of a real car or a model! FANTASTIC!

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