Roger Zimmermann

Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

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Pleased to hear that you feel better after the nasties got you down. We all must have been getting antsy for some news of your progress. 

I was thinking that if I had a way to thank you for all this wonderful project, what would it be? Now, after learning you were down, I think that what I wish for you is continued health and happiness for a long, long time. 

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With most of the parts installed, what is still to do? Obviously, the windshield and back window must now be installed. Even with the best I could do, the windows are not a perfect fit; they must be glued to the body to have a decent fitting. The most appropriate method is with clear silicone. In case it oozes on the window, it can be removed when cured. I just have to be careful as too much silicone inside will be extremely difficult to remove.

With such kind of cars, there are chromed parts associated with the windows. Before the installation, I checked the fit of the back widow molding and the one at the belt. The dip rail molding was too low; it prevented to belt molding to follow the roof’s shape. A small file shortened the drip molding on both side to allow the belt molding to go under.

On the picture, the upper back window molding is temporary installed to help the fitting of the “glass”. It will be glued later. The tape will be there for 24 hours, the time for the silicone to cure.

1050 Gluing the back window.JPG

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Roger

I am so glad to hear you are doing better. Life has it bumps and it seems they always set us back but where there is a will, there is a way. 

I will continue to pray for your health and well being.

Very, very nice build, I am so glad I came along for the journey. It has never disappointed me when I checked in on your progress.

Nelson

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roger, you are missed when there's no new posts and new pictures on your progress, what's going to happen when you are finish building this model ?

 

 

 

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Thanks for the comments!

To pontiac1953: you are not the sole person with that question. Some time ago, I took the decision that I will not do again a complete model, as it "eat" all my time. The next task (don't remember if I mention it already here: the electrical system on the Toronado model is not finished, it will be done. The electrical seat is no more functioning because the track system was not clever: it jams. I will do something similar to the Mark II as the seat in this model is working perfectly.

All those improvements will be related here as I don't feel a new topic will make sense. Of course, my reports will not be so often as they used to be. After that, collecting postmarks?

 

One part less lying around: the reveal or belt molding around the rear quarter. I don’t remember if its contour was following exactly the shape of the body; of course, after the paint process it was not. With a slight “massage”, the result was acceptable and I glued definitively with clear silicone. There are most probably stronger products for the task; the advantage here is the ease of cleaning of the excess material once it’s cured. Cyanoacrylate glue is fine but it’s etching the paint. If there is excess glue, the damages are irreversible.

At the same time, I’m preparing the windshield for the installation. One element after another!

 

1051 Gluing the belt molding.JPG

Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)
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This stuff is brilliant. I have used it to glue windows in a model car. It stays liquid until you hit it with the UV light, so you can remove it before its cured.

 

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/5-Second-Fix-Liquid-Plastic-UV-Seal-Wood-Glass-Fabric-Welding-Kit-Fix-Repair/163038439545?hash=item25f5d92879:g:sBEAAOSw8~JbK1fy:rk:21:pf:0

image.png.4e440bb830444f106fef367d766435ba.png

Edited by Fadt (see edit history)

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Thanks for the link; unfortunately it's too late! From a French forum I got also other links to products I was not aware. One learn something new each day!

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And now? No more updates? Indeed, I did almost nothing recently, slow enough to finish next year and not in 2018!

I want to do a nameplate instead of a license plate, of course with the script “MARK II”. I had the stupid idea to choose a script art with “feet” which is making each letter very difficult. Indeed, I cannot do them in one piece (except both I I) but in 2 or 3. The letters M and A are requiring 3 parts silver soldered together; probably I can do the R and K in 2 pieces. We’ll see.

As you can see, the “A” is still missing an element: I had to fix the /\ at the top to be able to adjust the missing element.

My letters are maybe too fat; it’s hard to see the results before something is done.

 

1052 Script.JPG

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The script is slowly going forwards; the letter “K” is not yet done.  All is done with a file; therefore some details are not 100% identical from one vertical element to the other. Hardly to be seen in reality, obvious when enlarged on the screen.

1053 Script incomplete.JPG

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Great work Roger. One question, how do you compensate for the thickness of the plating on the chromed parts? I really don't know how you work with such small parts! What talent and patients!

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The lettering is not that much bigger than the lettering on the quarter!!  The attention to detail continues to amaze, great job Roger!

 

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Thanks for all to ask questions, I like it! As I don't know how to handle multi quotes, I'll answer the easy way:

 

@jpage: the chrome thickness is about 0.01mm (0.004"), not very important. If I know that 2 plated parts are coming together, I can put some play before plating. With the 3 models I did, I had not too much trouble with the chrome thickness. However, at each model I have more problems with the paint thickness!

 

@Martin: whenever possible, I have studs to attach plated parts or I can fix them with screws. It's not always possible, like the window reveal moldings or the belt molding. They were glued with silicone and the quantity used is important to not have too much everywhere. An advantage of the clear silicone: it can be cleaned rather easily when cured.

 

@keiser: soon! those parts will be glued with instant glue. at another forum, somebody told me that those instant glues are not good with the time. Can be; but the name plates/letters on the Toronado are still on after about 10 years. The person who tol me that said it would be better to attach the letters with silicone. So, recently I did a test on a painted surface: 2 letters with silicon and 2 with instant glue. After 2 days, I tested how easy or difficult it was to remove them: the one attached with silicone went away almost just be looking at them while the ones offered some resistance. As the surface is tiny, that resistance is small too. This is the reason whey the letters on hood and trunk lid will be attached when everything is OK.

 

@Jeff: compared to the letters which will come on hood nd trunk lid, those are very large! However, their shape is not easy to reproduce.

Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)
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The script is ready. That “K” gave me trouble; I had to do a second one.

At first I wanted to soft solder the script to the base or license plate and paint the whole with a dark blue paint and, once dry, to scrap the paint from the script and polish the characters. I will do differently: paint the base and when the paint is dry, attach the characters with transparent silicone.

 

1054 Script complete.JPG

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Thanks Nelson!

 

A scale model is like a house: almost never finished for whatever reason. Those days, even if the Mark II is completely ready, my mind is sometimes in another place. When the Avanti model was finished, I noticed later that one piece was missing: the cover over the fuel tube. It's a small part, but without that, the interior is not complete. As the silicone for a molding had to cure on the Mark II, it was a good opportunity to look at this missing piece of trim. Without the rear window, shaping that part would have been very easy. Now, I had to do with the rear window, working from the LH door aperture.

Fortunately, I still had leather from the proper color and I could finish the cover. The next question was to find a way to glue it to the existing parts. A daub of silicone was helpful, it sticks at the fuel pocket without marring the surrounding leather. Now that model is really complete!

fuel tube cover.JPG

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4 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

Thanks Nelson!

 

A scale model is like a house: almost never finished for whatever reason. Those days, even if the Mark II is completely ready, my mind is sometimes in another place. When the Avanti model was finished, I noticed later that one piece was missing: the cover over the fuel tube. It's a small part, but without that, the interior is not complete. As the silicone for a molding had to cure on the Mark II, it was a good opportunity to look at this missing piece of trim. Without the rear window, shaping that part would have been very easy. Now, I had to do with the rear window, working from the LH door aperture.

Fortunately, I still had leather from the proper color and I could finish the cover. The next question was to find a way to glue it to the existing parts. A daub of silicone was helpful, it sticks at the fuel pocket without marring the surrounding leather. Now that model is really complete!

fuel tube cover.JPG

hi roger, which model is this one in the picture ?, certainly not the lincoln mark ll.

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It's a 1963 Studebaker Avanti; the Avanti name is in the text. When the Mark II will be done, I intend to tell the story from this model, if people agree.

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Roger

I am in total agreement.

I enjoy all you have done so far and it would be like ice cream on the cake.

Thank you

Nelson

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18 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

I intend to tell the story from this model

Yes please, Roger. Please put a link in this thread to that story when you tell it!

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