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Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12


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With a lot of guessing and silver soldering, the brackets for the rocker shafts are done. I also added the thread to attach the exhaust support. 
My first guessing was not right, the first shaft was too near from the cross member (or the shape from the cross member is not quite correct). I had to tilt up the special tool and add a spacer on the bracket's flange. With that, the second shaft was much too high (it would have been above the frame); I had to modify the tool to have it at the "right" place. Then the job was cut, adjust, solder, let cool to handle it, verify that both shafts are still free and so on, and so on.
There are still two holes at the cross member to be drilled; they could be done with the cross member installed in the frame. The holes are for the brake booster bracket; I'm sure it's better to drill them when I have the lateral position of the booster. 

287 Amost ready.JPG

288 Supports ready.JPG

289 Supports ready.JPG

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Pat, something is missing on my parts: the thing to put the grease. I still don't know if I will ad them; there are maybe about 60! Anyway, thanks for your comments.

 

Finally, the frame is ready: I fabricated the supports for the transmission and silver soldered them to the second cross member. With that done, it was rather easy to put the cross member into the frame (thanks its elasticity, I had not too much trouble to insert and remove it several times times) and soft soldering it. The rivets are not yet in place as you can see.
The rubber bushings at the rear transmission was a wise decision, with my construction's variations, the holes in the supports are not perfectly aligned with the bushings. 
That second cross member is giving a significant torsion's resistance to the frame, but I'm sure that those frames are not very rigid and the road behavior was certainly miles away as what we have today. As almost all cars were made is a similar fashion, it was considered as "normal".

290 Engine on frame.JPG

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Roger, will this build include the steering gear box, with all the rest- column and wheel? For that matter, while I'm asking away, will it also have the clutch and brake pedal assembly? It is sure starting to look more and more like a car! We love this stuff!

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Pat, you certainly know that I cannot build a scale model without functioning elements! Sure, the steering box will be added as well as the column and wheel. The hand brake will come maybe soon as I'm doing right now the cover for the transmission. You will ask: what is the relation? Well, the shaft for the hand brake is part of that cover.

Clutch and brake pedal will be added; the goal is that the brakes at each wheel will be functioning. We'll see once if I'm too ambitious or not... 

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Sometimes, I'm wandering from one element to another one, without relation between both. After the frame was ready, I was faced with the same question: and now? There are still hundreds of parts to be made, the choice is large enough! This time, I decided to finish one element: the transmission.
The closing cover was just not yet done, not a big deal. This small part let me do many errors by not paying attention at what I was doing. 
I first did the flat part from the cover with a thick brass plate. Easy. Then I did the holes for the screws. As the location for the holes is done just with a rule, they are not perfectly spaced/aligned and I know that. With the flat element ready, I used it to drill the holes into the transmission's case. This implied that just one position of the cover's base would be right.
When I silver soldered the curved part on the base, I managed to flip it over; in other words, I soldered the next part on what should be the surface contacting the transmission's case. Result: the hole were no more perfectly aligned. I enlarged 3 from the 6 until I could insert the screws. 
Then it was time to make a large hole in the curved part for the shift lever "tower". The position of it is not in the middle and here, I managed to do it at the wrong end! I had to enlarge more holes to be able to screw the cover...Fortunately, the bolt's heads are large enough to cover the holes...
The remaining elements were added without problem. One of them is the shaft for the hand brake. The small cylinder at one end is representing the switch for the back-up lamp.

The hand brake lever is therefore part of the transmission... I will continue with that. This is a monstrous lever half meter long which recall me the brake lever the "driver" from the cable cars in San Francisco are using, at least is what I saw in the seventies.

291 transmission cover.JPG

292 cover installed.JPG

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The hand brake lever is looking a lot like a sculpture from the Swiss Giacometti, but has no value compared to his "marvels"!
For the moment, there is just the profile from that lever and the lower part is far from finished: there will be a fork for the pawl. I will first doing the upper part and then the lower one.
On the real car, this lever is about 20" tall from the axle to the end...Imagine that is a car from today!

293 hand brake lever.JPG

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On 4/6/2021 at 6:55 PM, Buicknutty said:

Amazing work Roger. I have seen so much of your work, yet I'm always astounded by the detail and quality of it.

Keith

Yes it is. 

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Thanks for the comments!

 

Another small item added: the ratchet for the hand brake. At first glance, it's an easy part, but not for a model. First, I wanted to have it wide enough for strength, but the starter motor said no: I'm too close. The plan B was to have a thinner plate to satisfy the starter motor and a wider element with the teeth. But, how to do the teeth? On my basic machine, I cannot mill a curved segment and be sure that the distance between teeth is the same. As I intended to do the part in two pieces, the solution was easy: to mill the teeth on a straight piece with a 60° milling tool and then to bend the segment to soft solder it on the base.
I have now to do the pawl; if my construction will work as intended is totally unsure. If I have no success, that will be just decorative and not functional.

294 Ratchet.JPG

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It seems that my expectation about a workable hand brake will come to reality. I did the pawl, out of steel as brass may be too weak. Indeed, I made two pieces. As the first one did not please me, the second one was refined, somewhat shorter and the geometry modified a bit. When the lower part of the hand brake lever will go to the left, the pawl is preventing the movement. On the contrary, the pawl allow the movement and the hand brake can be set without using the handle at the top of the lever, which will be done shortly.
The hole on the lever just above the pawl is for the rod actuating the rear brakes.
Thanks to Alex D., I modified the handle of the lever. My estimated dimensions were way too generous. Alex measured the assembly from his car and submitted a nice drawing with legible dimensions. The handle seen on the picture is half way between my estimates and Alex's dimensions. As brass is not the strongest material (and I cannot do the lever in steel), I will probably choose a compromise between reality and something stronger.
Thanks Alex!
 

295 Pawl and lever.JPG

296 function test.JPG

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Roger,

As they would say in Germany......... Wunderbar!   

 

Really Roger, Getting the components in this minute size is beyond the scope of 99.9% of the modlers out here. 

And to get the finite details built into every component just leaves me in awe of your skills.  You may not be a watchmaker but you certainly have that Swiss ethic for attention to precision and detail.  I am sure that others will come along in the future, but for now, you are in the rare either of those that have that "gift" for duplication in minature.

 

Phenomenal, Roger. 

 

Randy

 

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Ah yes,

 

The old dillema of instant gratification.  One thing about the new generation, they have NO PATIENCE ! ! !  I tried to explain to a young man (18 years old) that to get a quality job, you have to take the time to put in the effort to get  good results.  He just looked at me like a deer in the headlights.  I have no faith in this "I Phone" generation.  If it isin't in an ap or on Google, they are lost. 

 

I am sure there are exceptions to this but they are so far removed from the rest of the "herd".  

 

There is a guy, David Engles of Engles Coach Shop in Joliet, Montant who is a master wagon builder.  And I mean a MASTER (like you).  Every phase of wagon construction from wheels to folding tops, he builds from the old parts or from scratch.  He is amazing to watch also.  

 

Craftsmen like you and he (and a few more) are the reason that we are so fortunate that Youtube came along.  Now you can share your art with us all.

It is exciting to open up our AACA Forums to see the latest progress that you have accomplished, plus your detaild description on how you overcame the obsticles in the part(s) progress.

 

Just looking at the part dosen't tell the story, but you accompany the pictures with the details as to how you got there along with the trial and error(s) before the part is finished.  And Roger, they look sooooooooo amazing.  If we did not see you building them and they were photographed by themselves, one would think that they are looking at a full sized 1:1 part.  Such is your art. 

 

Randy

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I'm really glad Roger makes these parts out of brass...I can at least tell they're not the real thing by the brass color. Once they get painted, though...😄

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Only a small detail is missing; otherwise, the hand brake lever is complete. What's missing? A tiny spring which is located between the movable handle and the fixed one. With the spring, the pawl is pushed down, securing the lever when the hand brake is activated.
As you can see, the rod is screwed into the trunnion. I wanted to skip that complication, but I quickly realized that this is need, otherwise the rod cannot be inserted into the guide near the pivoting point.

 

297 Almost ready.JPG

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A tiny spring...No rocket science, isn't it? Well, if only I would have fingers' size in relation to the spring! It went twice in the air, found it on the floor both times, a luck!
Now, the hand brake lever is functional; I hope that after the plating (only the tiny rod is painted), there will be enough play at the handle and pawl to let the spring doing his job, because his strength is rather limited!
I will go now to the other side of the transmission: one cover must be done plus the brake and clutch support which is bolted to the transmission. I think I will need again the help from Alex for the location of the pedals...
Don't look too much at my nail: it get sometimes caught by the files as fingers are sometimes the best vice!

298 Huge spring.JPG

299 Function test.JPG

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It seems that my hand brake picture was well received!

 

Before I began with the complex casting supporting the brake and clutch pedals (for which Alex sent me critical dimensions, thanks again Alex!), I did both covers which were missing: the one for the idle gear and the one for the clutch ventilation. Now I can, with the help from many pictures, design that support attached to the transmission.

300 Small covers.JPG

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On 4/12/2021 at 11:58 AM, Paulie9fingers said:

That is very cool, so do you pull the lever back to set the parking brake or push it forward ?

 

On 4/12/2021 at 12:03 PM, Roger Zimmermann said:

Thanks! To set the parking brake, you pull the lever towards the seat.

 

 

You mean that thing actually WORKS?? Holy cow! I thought Paulie was asking about the lever in the real car!

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Wow. This transmission is a terrific model, all by itself. 

Earlier, there was a photo showing your slightly filed down finger. I have done the same- but I didn't end up with a lovely piece of artistry for the agony. I must need different files, huh?

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@ JamesR: yes that hand brake lever is working as intended; my goal is that the brakes are functioning on all four wheels with the main brake pedal or to the two at the rear with the hand brake lever. Totally futile, but I like it!

 

@ Pat: certainly the files are not the same, try smaller ones!

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That tiny stupid support for the pedals took me a long time to understand its general shape! Finally, I got it more or less right; I hope that the position of the pedal's shaft is not too far away from the reality. 
When I did the pictures from that frame and engine, the free-wheeling system was removed or was never installed as I don't know if it was standard or optional. As the bracket is the same for all V-12 and V-16 engines, "my" bracket has the provisions to install the valving (there are the tiny holes flanking the shaft), but will stay that way. Anyway, as I have pictures from a 1932 V-8 equipped with that system, I'm wondering how both boosters could be attached to the frame; I have the impression that there is not enough space.
I did also the 4 "yoke adjusting quadrants" and temporarily installed them. It was wise: I noticed that the screw behind the hand brake lever was interfering with the lever. I made it thinner in that location and reduced the height of the bold attaching that quadrant.
The next goal? The gear shift. Aa ACCA forum member gave me its length (another dimension I skipped when I could have measure it) and it's time for it. 

 

Most all my brass parts are silver soldered. For years, I had Castolin 1802 rods in 1 mm or 1.5 mm diameter. That specific solder is no more available because it contains cadmium. The manufacturer is now selling the Castolin 1800 which is cadmium free, but has a higher content of silver. The temperature needed is almost the same, so I can do the switch. There is just one problem: nobody is selling those rods by the piece as it was the case years ago. The minimum quantity is 1/2 kg for about $ 650.00. Finally, I gave up with my researches and ordered that minimum quantity. I will probably have silver soldering material for the next 100 years! Anyway, a local jeweler is interested to buy some quantity from that material, but I don't know how many rods... 

301 Pedals support.JPG

302 Pedeal support.JPG

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Looks great as usual Roger.

Just to make things a little more complex for you, here is a couple pictures of the Clutch and brake assist boosters from a V12 car. The clutch assist is part of the freewheeling. I do not believe the V8 Cars had brake assist boosters.

 

top view

1353004474_clutchBrakeBoosterstopview(Medium).JPG.3a178e2b589495483459a2158d326529.JPG

 

bottom view

2065449242_ClutchBrakeBoostersbottomview(Medium).JPG.9cc67d6a2ea6dd85fd3157899f77a77e.JPG

 

view from under

1373709314_Brakebooster(Medium).JPG.8b13eef5e8dbd9edce4a51f195b03018.JPG

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Should I say: thanks Alex! or: that's not fair to show this arrangement! Anyway, now things are clear: the brake booster is attached at the point I'm aware of and the clutch assist is installed much higher. I have good pictures from the clutch assist from a V-8 car car, if I don't know what to do, I can add it! I will first do the brake assist system, then we'll see! On your pictures, I see a shield to protect the brake and clutch system from the exhaust heat. This shield was not present on the chassis in Germany, but it makes sense. Now, I understand the usage from this small bracket shaped as a "L" attached to the transmission. The whole set-up is making a very busy place near the transmission!

Thanks to your third picture, I have a nice view from under of the support for the pedals. What I did is not too far away!

You are correct, V-8 cars had no brake assistance.

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The brace from the L bracket is something I added to belter support the heat shield. There is a mud pan on each side of the engine which I do not have that is attached to the heat shield. Here is some pictures from the authenticity manual.

 

1737291937_DSCN5042(Medium).JPG.6a04e197856e7fb42d992eda7b38dbf5.JPG

Heat shield ^

130028688_DSCN5032(Medium).JPG.37e6e7f305f3a41ef05d4128ee522db8.JPG

1931^

 

1801652210_DSCN5037(Medium).JPG.ededd3d13f92224a1b4329796c205d7a.JPG

1932 mud pan.  V16 should be longer.^

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Roger,

 

For a 30's car, the pictures of the real transmission and hardware is...........boggling to say  the least !  Very complex.  I wonder how much of that you can duplicate in 1:6 scale?  Oh wait, I forgot who I was talking to.  Roger, if anybody can master this, it is you. 

 

It will be VERY BUSY at that site.  The levers, linkages, hoses, booster etc.. etc.  The GM engineers went overboard to complicate matters, didn't they?  I am sure that it was all necessary  but................very  complex.

I am sure that you will have a solution for all  that hardware, though.  We will all await your answer to this complex puzzle.

Randy

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Thanks Alex for the details about the shield and mud pan shelf. Tanks to your comments, I now realize why the 1933 frame/engine in Germany had no freewheeling: it was no more available. Indeed, this info is in the shop manual; I did not saw it until this morning!

Randy: why 1:6? it's 1:12! You are right, all those tiny parts will be a nightmare to reproduce. However, when I'm looking at each individual piece, it may not be that bad. I have anyway an advantage: they must not be functional.

I assume that this complex affair was not because the engineers wanted to make things complicated just for the fun of it: it was necessary to have them that way because all was mechanical. When I will do the linkage for the brakes, I will explain why there is a slot here or there. The fact that the handbrake is actuating the same rods as the service brake without actuating the front brakes was requiring some tricks. They will be explained in due time. Most probably all the vehicles with pure mechanical brakes had a similar arrangement. Things were much simplified with the arrival of hydraulic brakes, which I could not reproduce in that scale!

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21 hours ago, Alex D. said:

Looks great as usual Roger.

Just to make things a little more complex for you, here is a couple pictures of the Clutch and brake assist boosters from a V12 car. The clutch assist is part of the freewheeling. I do not believe the V8 Cars had brake assist boosters.

 

top view

1353004474_clutchBrakeBoosterstopview(Medium).JPG.3a178e2b589495483459a2158d326529.JPG

 

bottom view

2065449242_ClutchBrakeBoostersbottomview(Medium).JPG.9cc67d6a2ea6dd85fd3157899f77a77e.JPG

 

view from under

1373709314_Brakebooster(Medium).JPG.8b13eef5e8dbd9edce4a51f195b03018.JPG

 

 

Wow, talk about 10 lbs of poop in a 5 lb bag, there a lot of stuff in a small area

Roger that transmission is really turning out amazing

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Indeed, a shifter is not that difficult to do, except that its diameter is not constant. It's not possible to machine it the usual way because, due to the length, its too flexible. I had to improvise doing a bit after the other, taking care that the shaft is not like a camel. 
As I like difficulties, I added a "H" grille into the transmission, used a ball from a bearing, added some small parts and now, the lever can be shifted to all four positions. Totally unnecessary, but fun!
The next job: the brake and clutch pedals. I will do first the basic; the multitude of levers, springs and so on, especially for the brake system, will be added when the suspension will be added as I need the axles for the various rods.

303 H grille.JPG

304 With shift lever.JPG

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Due to maintenance at my old cars scale 1:1, there was a slow activity with the model. Anyway, there is some news. I began the clutch and brake pedals. As I had not enough material 2mm thick, I silver soldered two 1 mm elements to have the adequate thickness at the base. The thickness at the top is about half; the pedal at the left is now ready for further working on it, the pedal at the right must still be "thinned".

 

305 Pedals.JPG

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