Jump to content

Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12


Recommended Posts

If the provision for the clutch lever went not too bad (I have much more time to design and "place" it on the transmission than to do the part), it's another story for the installation of the starter motor. Finally, I began with the motor, working towards the transmission. As I had the length and diameter of the motor, I have the impression that it will be easier to adapt the assembly to the transmission than doing the contrary.
Just to show you why it's difficult, I'm adding two pictures from the original assembly. You will notice that all elements after the starter motor are at odd angles and not in line with the motor because there was  a reduction gear. No picture about what I did because a starter motor is just a cylinder, nothing spectacular.

Starter6.JPG

Transmission as found (9).JPG

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cadillac manual may have been 'minimalist' back then, but things like those adjusters are probably the very reason we saw so many signs at shops advertising that they employed 'factory-trained mechanics'.  

I never knew such a thing existed, but sure would have welcomed them on a few gearboxes I've owned over the years. Roger, do you know how long that feature lasted? I had a LaSalle transmission ('bout the same as a Caddy) back in the sixties and don't recall hearing about that novel feature on that- 1939 transmission.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So much time for so little! In fact, I spent 3 afternoons to install the front seat into my '72 coupe, scale 1:1. Even if it was only 5°C, I did not felt the cold temperature because those seats are not easy to handle, especially alone!
In between, I could do the tortuous parts between the starter motor and the transmission. I began the parts attached to the starter motor, going forwards. At one time, I had to begin the adapter which is part of the transmission's case, hoping that no major flaw would appear when all is assembled. I'm making no illusion: the assembly is looking similar to the real one, but not exactly identical.
Some details must be added like the flange for the operating lever. As most of the readers don't know how that starter motor is operated, a short description may be useful: when the driver want to start the engine, he is pushing a pedal located at the right of the gas pedal. With some levers and rods, this action has two consequences: first the pinion is pushed forwards to the flywheel and second, the lever is pushing a contact on a switch installed on the top of the starter motor, connecting the battery to the motor. With some chance, the engine will start. As I never experienced myself such a starting procedure, owners for car dating from this time will correct me if I'm wrong.

Enfin en place.JPG

276 Starter motor.JPG

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Roger,

 

Nice job on the starter offset.  Owning two 1930's cars, the starter is the same on all this era cars.  Depressing the starter button on the floor engages the starter gear into the flywheel and the switch is pushed in, energizing the starter motor.  It was this way until Bendix Corp. devised the "starter solenoid"  This did away  with the foot switch and used the wonderous "new technology" of the electromagnet to thrust the bendix (a sliding gear on the motor shaft) into the flywheel. When the engine caught, you released the button and it would return to the neutral position.  Later the key switch was developed with the internal spring.  When the engine started, you released the key, returning to neutral and the bendix retracts stopping the starter motor.  Most of you all know this but for those who don't ....................... 

 

Now,   wearing a device (key fob) that emits radio signals to the cars computer letting the car know that the owner is here, unlocking the doors and awaiting the driver to push the start button on the dash with no key. THIS is space age.  Unless your battery is dead.  😞 But in the thirties, the "self starter"  was fantastic as you did not have to get in front of your automobile and crank the engine over by hand.  Many injuries like broken arms and thumbs were suddenly a thing of the past as "Modern Marvels" of the automotive engineer came to be.

 

Today we have a whole new set of items that wear out.  Bendixs and solynoids go bad and need replacing.  In most cases today, you cannot buy the starter solenoid or bendix assemblies separate from the starter motor (as you could a few years back)  unless you know a rebuild shop where you can buy the parts needed. Try to talk to NAPA today. Most of the "kids" there cannot help you if it is not in their computer on the counter.  And they only list the parts that move.  Older parts are deleted from the computer but they still have them.  You  just have to have a counter person who knows how to look in the book to find them. (Thank heavens I know an old timer at NAPA  who can pull out the book and look up the part and get it ordered for me).  Ditto for Carquest, Advanced Auto Parts,  O'Rilleys etc., etc.

 

It was much simpler back in the day as the starter was manual using your foot to activate it. The bendixs and solynoids were not there to malfunction or go bad.  As long as you had a pedal on the floorboard and your starter motor was in good order, it was failsafe lasting for many, many years before needing attention.  My starter has an oil cup to keep the bendix lubed.  And my 36 Plymouth has an umbilicle (lube hose) from the bellhousing to the throwout bearing that I give a shot of grease a couple of times a year to keep it healthy.  This was part of the lube maintenance for these cars. No such dice today, eh? Suspensions are sealed and last till they go bad.  Replacement time is not easy on your pockebook.  

 

On that Cadillac Roger, have you ever seen the lube chart for the engine, chassis and suspension parts?  I have the one for my Plymouth P2 Touring Sedan.  36 lube points!  I even have a special tool that fits over the "gaiters" (spring covers) to lube all 4 of the leaf springs.  You lube both sides from the U bolts to the shackles!  I was fortunate to find this rare tool on Ebay. Those were the days of preventative maintenance, not planned obsolescence. Once I lube the springs, the ride is quiet and smoooooooth.  Like your 72 Cadillac.

 

Randy

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh! Randy, this is a discussion which would never end (about the prices and repair impossibilities), I prefer not to touch that subject.

The shop manual has a chart for the lubrification. The number of lube points is incredible, I will have to count them when I will add them to the model!

 

The last details were added to the starter motor: the switch, some ribs and the flange for the lever pushing on the switch's button. Now that the assembly is completed, I can do that lever.
I gave a light coat of primer to avoid further oxidation.
The apertures at the commutator's end are just here for the fun. They should be wider to be correct. Anyway, a large cover band will be added later, similar to the one for the generator.
On the pictures I have from Johan, there is another bracket welded on top of the switch for a different actuating lever. On the '32 V-8 photos album, also from Johan, there is no bracket. Therefore I skip it.

277 Starter motor.JPG

278 Starter motor.JPG

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

9 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

Like on the generator, they are fake screws!

 

Truly amazing. There are many questions I have about someone who is able to produce work at this level. One of them is: Do you have to take measures to keep from straining your eyes when making such exacting parts from scratch? I.E., do you have to limit the number of hours you work per day for the sake of your eyes? I know you use magnification aids, but to me it still seems like it would be an enormous strain.

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

What is your next question?

 

Switzerland has a reputation for craftsmanship, especially with regards to mechanical things. I'm wondering if members of your family - father or some other forebearer - had some connection to the famous watch making industry in your country (or some other fine instrument industry) and maybe that's how you acquired a propensity for fine detail work. Just curious.

Edited by JamesR (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Well, my father and his father were woodworkers. Not exactly high precision business! Since a young boy, I was attracted by automobiles, to the dismay of my father. I'm not aware from people from our family who was involved in the precision industry. Thinking a bit (it may happen!), my mother's brother was a funny guy; he had a restaurant on a tiny village, did his own lemonade, had various (or just one?) old cars and was mechanically inclined. Did I get something from him?

When a got a car toy (mostly tin models), I was disappointed by the lack of details. Maybe as I was frustrated, I began to make cars with cardboard; with that crude material, I was able to make doors which could be opened. The very last usage of that material was for a Chrysler from the sixties which is no more existing. Still crude, but for the next project, the polyester would improve the end result.

 

Chrysler.jpg

Chrysler1.jpg

Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)
  • Like 5
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, JamesR said:

That's made out of cardboard?? 

Yes! I had previously a problem: cardboard can be bent in one direction but not in two. By humecting the carboard, it's possible to have compound curves, however with some limitation. On this model, the bumpers are made with painted wood!

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Roger,

That cannot be a minature starter?  It looks so authentic.  Great work in shrinking it to that size.  With the bands coververing the brush vents, it will be as authentic as the 1:1 starter.  This one is more complex with the offset.  Amazing.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

27 minutes ago, drhach said:

I had to look up "humecting". For us common folk, that means "get it wet" :). Great work as always Roger. 

Thanks drhach! Sometimes I'm good at inventing new words...However, this time the spelling device did not protest. Further, humecting is implying less water than "get it wet". Because, when the cardboard is wet, you can just throw it away!

9 minutes ago, Randiego said:

Roger,

That cannot be a miniature starter?  It looks so authentic.  Great work in shrinking it to that size.  With the bands covevering the brush vents, it will be as authentic as the 1:1 starter.  This one is more complex with the offset.  Amazing.

 

Thanks Randy! Effectively, the offset gave me a lot of trouble...

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are still a myriad of small parts do do to declare the transmission "completed": the clutch lever, the upper cover with the shaft for the hand brake, the adapter on the left side with the shaft for the clutch and brake pedals, and son on. I elected to continue towards the rear for a good reason: to be able to finish the frame. Transmission and frame? What is the relation? Easy: there are 6 supports for the engine and transmission: 2 at the front, which are done. Two at the rear of the engine, attached to the frame and finally, two at the end of the transmission attached to the second cross member. I need the complete engine and transmission to do this cross member!
The next part needed was the housing for the main shaft of the transmission (sans shaft on the model). This part is an assembly of a "hat" and a lower housing. I had the stupid idea to do the lower housing in one piece. The end result was not so good, therefore is did it in two bits assembled with silver solder.
On the picture, the "hat" has a hole. This was needed to remove the shaft from the idler gear in case of trouble with the transmission installed in the frame. 
The next element will be more complicated with my simple equipment: creating the ball seat, ball assembly and rear support. The ball assembly is needed to allow the drive shaft's tube to follow the movements of the suspension. As my suspension will be active like my other models, I cannot escape this provision.

279 added details.JPG

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

When a scale model is just a push mobile, some liberties are possible. As mentioned in my last post, the torque tube for the drive shaft is attached to a ball. This element is looking like a bell with an outside shape like a ball and the inside shaped in a similar fashion. That ball is pushing on a ball seat and the transmission support is the third member of the assembly. There is a procedure to minimize the free play. That complex set-up is not really suitable for a scale model, so I simplified it. The ball seat in my construction is indeed a ball; the ball as designed by the manufacturer is resting on it. As in reality, the support is closing the assembly. 
At first, I intended to have the ball pushed against the transmission support with a spring, however, as the assembly must prevent the rear axle to go forth and back, I modified my design. 
The first picture is showing the "ball seat"; the ball and rear support are on the second picture. The third one is showing the assembly. I have some free play (maybe 0.2mm - 0.008") which will not be detrimental to the model.
The rear transmission support is a nice casting which took more time to build as the ball and its seat. Now, I have the total length from the engine and transmission; I will begin the second cross member soon; I may have some other details to do.

280 Ball seat.JPG

281 ball and rear support.JPG

282 Assembly.JPG

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, drhach said:

Hi Roger, so is that ball effectively a universal joint that is used on newer driveshafts? Would the driveshaft hard mount to the output flange? Is there something similar at the differential end? 

No, the ball is just something to let swing the torque tube, like a knee. In the real car, there is an universal joint behind that ball, connected to the drive shaft. 

The torque tube is screwed at the ball and at the differential. Indeed, I suppose that Buick cars from that time till the early fifties had a similar system, as well as other vehicles with a torque tube. Most certainly if you google "torque tube" you will have a better description as I can do.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Roger,
I've been following your model from the beginning, I ran out of superlative compliments for your work years ago... and now watch for every update. 

Although entirely unrelated, I came across a news article on a Greek modeling puzzle from over 2000 years ago you may find intriguing. 

If you find it at all interesting, be sure to click the link in the first paragraph to the 11 minute video which explains the still unknown methods the ancient Greeks used to make miniature metal gears.  Perhaps you will have your own idea on how they built the instrument using crude tools.  Feel free to delete this post after your review as it has no relevance to your model... other than another example of incredible craftsmanship from the ages.

https://arstechnica.com/science/2021/03/scientists-solve-another-piece-of-the-puzzling-antikythera-mechanism/

Edited by Buick 59 (see edit history)
  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As a preparation for the cross member, I assembled the transmission with 3 screws to the engine and put the assembly into the frame. The transmission's supports are about at mid-distance of the frame! The "usable" space is indeed rather small compared to a modern car. No wonder that they offered a longer wheelbase! My model is on the short one, 143".

283 frame and engine.JPG

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That second cross member took a long time to build. And sometimes I'm not very productive...Also, it's always a bit difficult to show something at the "right" moment; some may be bored to see some brass bits before the part is looking the way it should. Now I can show it and the way it will be in relation to the transmission: I "just" have to add the brackets to the cross member! You'll probably noticed that the supports at the transmission have bushing made with rubber, more or less like the original. The goal here is not to avoid to transmit vibrations to the frame but to facilitate the installation of the bolts as the bushing/brackets may not align perfectly.
The cross member is also not yet ready to install in the frame: the brake system is attached to it. I have to begin the supports for the actuating tubes; once the supports can be screwed on that crossmember I will solder it to the frame. After that, any drilling at the front or rear will be impossible. Therefore a good planning is the key to the lack of failure!

284 Second cross member.JPG

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As I would like to have operative brakes (a dream from youth: when I first began my Avanti model, I wanted to have...hydraulic brakes. I did not even had a lathe then. Needless to say, they were stillborn), the system must be reproduced as well as possible. However, if you are looking at my own picture, it does not look like the original system. What am I trying to do?
I'm attaching also a picture from a real chassis.
The answer soon!

Rear support1.JPG

285 Brake system.JPG

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, maybe some had a sleepless night not knowing what I intended to do. The solution is here: it's a special tool combined with an element which will be used. The picture below is giving some light, as well as a picture from the real bracket for the rocker shafts. 
For a long time, I had no idea how I could position in the air a bearing, a flange and the links attaching them. Not only both brackets should be identical regarding the position of both bearings but the rocker shafts must move without binding.
The solution I found was to make a long strip with both flanges, add on that strip two brackets to held the shafts at the proper distance.
When the brackets will be ready, the excess material will be removed.

286 Special tool.JPG

Rear support5.jpg

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...