Roger Zimmermann

Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

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Thanks Carl to look at my thread! It's something different as a car to the ones you are accustomed for. By the way, did you hear something from the French guy who needed urgently a Cadillac to buy?

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I never heard back from Laurent , Roger. I emailed , received no response. As you know , I had put enormous effort into making his trip to our country enjoyable and productive. If you consider the amount of time , money , and effort HE had spent , it may be understandable that the collapse of his dreams and trip due to illness was devastating. Remember also that his two other friends were depending on him to translate. I spoke with him on the phone during the time he was preparing for his automotive adventure. He is very intelligent , with idiomatic proficiency in English , albeit heavily accented. I found him to catch on well to the parameters of Cadillac hunting in Los Angeles. I thoroughly interrogated the owners of the cars he selected , (others also) , and of the large market available in Southern California , he had picked the right ones ! I hope he can replenish his lost Euros and recover his confidence , and make another try. I would be happy to help him again. Thank you for asking.

 

And your recent US Cadillac acquisition ? Has it been delivered intact ? Sight unseen , was it not ? I hope it met your expectations.

 

I think you are "more popular than Elvis" these days ! A third of a million views ! All the friends and awe struck admirers ! World wide ! You are a standard bearer for the tradition of Swiss precision !              Again , Roger , Thank You so much for taking all the time to share with us !      - Carl 

 

 

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Ah! more popular than Elvis...maybe, in that forum certainly, but not with the same income! If I'm adding the views from other forums where I'm also "active", I have more than half a million of them! Fortunately, I don't have to thanks each one!

 

My "new" car is not yet arrived, mostly my fault: I did not ask Brian Faull if he had the time and I never asked for a deadline. Now, it seems that the car will be ready end of June. It will arrive sometimes during the autumn. I'm sure I'm the sole as...le who can wait more than a year from payment to delivery!

 

I'm still not convinced that the Laurent's story was real, but I'm not always right!

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I'll tell you , Roger : Laurent"s story COULD conceivably have been a fabrication. I am a bit too trusting for my own good. However , remember I DID speak with him for some time on the phone. If he was able to perpetrate such a fiction over the duration , and considering the knowledge he acquired of the L.A. target Cadillac market , he may have a job waiting for him right here in Hollywood ! He would have had to been an actor of the caliber of "Bobby" D.N. Maybe even to the level of Sir "Laurent" O. ! 

 

And as to your patience in waiting for your Cadillac , patience , in your case , is an obvious virtue ! Admittedly , at times it can be a pain in the pos...ior !      ?.    - Carl 

 

Edited by C Carl
Clarification (see edit history)

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This is my first post here, but it's a long, long way from my first visit. I've been following this thread (and a few others) since I don't remember when. Fabulous and interesting to learn about an automobile and its miniature recreation all in one spot. Bravo.

As it nears completion, I along with others, I'd bet, are reading each new post with a bittersweet feeling. The desire to have it run on endlessly is battling with the excitement of seeing the finished work. Roger, you are a hero to this aging guy in middle of the Nevada desert. 

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Roger,

What Cadillac are you adding to your collection if I may ask?  Is it restored or is it another "project" ?  The three that you have are beautiful and it will be interesting to see what you are adding to your stable of cars.

 

Randy

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November 30, 2016, the new owner from my 1956 Cadillac Sedan de Ville loaded that car on his trailer. For about one year, I bought a 1972 Cadillac Coupe de Ville with about 20'000 miles. As I suspected that maintenance could be an issue, I let transport the car to a Cadillac parts supplier who has also a garage. As I told him that it was not urgent, the begin with the  repairs was late 2017. Recently, I had his promise that the car will be ready for the long "drive" to Europe at the end of June.

As you see, I don't intend to work too much on that car... 

Somewhere in this forum I did a port about that buy; I don't remember if I added pictures.

 

The body of the model is at99% ready for the paint. It has now about 2 weeks to stabilize...

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Hi Roger, 

I've been following this thread for a number of years now, first on a different forum, but then I lost the build! Thanks to a posting by Barry Wolk, I managed to find it again, but on this site, and reread from the beginning, and have been following along, eagerly awaiting new posts!

I have to say, I am always amazingly shocked and impressed with your work. Thanks to this post, and after buying one of Wingroves books, I think I'm about ready to try my hand at some brass scratchbuilding. I'm not sure why I've waited this long to sign up to comment, but I feel it was long overdue.

 

I hope you are doing well, and I can't wait to see the next installment of this incredible build. Thank you so much for documenting this as you have. It's been a huge inspiration.

 

-Adam

 

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Hi Adam

Thank for your fidelity! Go ahead with your project; usually the beginning is not very promising; this is learning by doing!

 

Good luck!

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Taking measurement to make sure its straight and true, before you paint it.

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Unfortunately, you are on the wrong track. If I'm adding that the picture is just one step and some steps will be added, can you see more clearly the intend of that construction (which was used on the Avanti too...)?

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53 minutes ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

You are on the right way. But the explanation is not complete!

Paint it carefully ?  LOL

 

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No good answer..."Paint" is correct, but this device is not used to paint the frame. More suggestions? You'll get the answer tomorrow!

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Looks like it will be used as an assembly stand for after the paint job. That way, everything is accessible from the top or bottom.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)

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It's simply a demonstration of the new one-point automoble lift destined for a Harbor Freight store near you.

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5 hours ago, Spinneyhill said:

so you can sit the body on the frame to paint the body?

That's perfectly correct! I need the frame to attach the front fenders, this is the reason why the frame is first installed on that tool. As the body will be painted in the kitchen, I cannot turn around it, therefore this is the body which must turn!

 

@ keiser31: your sentence is almost correct: just take away the word "assembly stand for AFTER the paint job"

 

@ zipdang: Harbor Freight does not exist in Switzerland...By the way, one-point automotive lift were used years ago to wash the underbody and were moved with compressed air. I don't know if that system still exists.

 

Thanks to all for your help "solving" that quiz!

 

 

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Roger,

 

The US was teeming with the Pneumatic/hydro lifts back in the day.  Almost all shops use the frame style hoists today (I have a 10,000 lb hoist in my warehouse).  The problem with the old hydraulic hoists was that they had to have a sizable hole excavated in the floor as the cylinder was over 8' tall.  And the labor and materials pretty much sped to it's demise.  It is much less expensive for the newer style hoist.  I got my new  lift installed back in 2005 for $4,250.00 (a good price at the time).  

 

Today, the market is saturated with lifts (thank you China) and you can pic up a good used one (un-installed) between $1,200.00 and $2,000.00.  Installation extra.  but they are easy to install and you don't need more than a fork lift to do the job. They are 115 Volt so you do not need 220. 

I cannot imagine what the old style lift would cost to install.  There are still some around.  I don't think that they make any new ones any longer but I may be mistaken.

 

The one good thing about the old lifts is that their "foot print" is smaller than the new lifts.   

 

All the dealers and garages had many of these lifts.  They were used from brake jobs, muffler and shock installation, transmission and drive train R&R,  and  most everything else.  All the dealers that I worked for had at least 8 to 12 in the shop.  I saw a new shop here in Oceanside where the owner managed to get 6 of these older  lifts from a dealer refurbished  and had them installed.  He did not want the bulky look of the newer lifts as the access to the work area was unencumbered with the hydraulic lift. It is a state of the art shop right down to the epoxy floors finished in an off white, LED overhead lighting, etc., etc. Stunning shop.

 

Do you see many of these old style lifts there in Switzerland?

 

Randy

 

 

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As the ground is very expensive here, garages have usually a store room under the shop. Therefore the volume and space needed for those lifts are rendering them obsolete. I saw them mostly in washing rooms were there is nothing under. One benefit of those lifts is there is no problem electricity/water as they are powered with compressed air.

As I'm no more traveling to dealers, I cannot tell if they are still in use...

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