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Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12


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Finally, the valve covers were finished by adding the décor on top. The lines were machined with a very narrow milling tool and the décor soft welded on the cover. The original parts are aluminum, with the décor polished, the remaining surfaces being black. As my parts are made with brass, the covers will be chromed and painted like the original parts.

The question I was faced was: with what will I continue? After switching between gear box and water pump, I opted for the water pump and the 3 water tubes, two on the passenger side and one on the left side.

257 valve covers ready.JPG

258 valve covers ready.JPG

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As I wrote earlier, I began the water pump. That damn part is full of curves; almost nothing is straight, with the exception of the attaching brackets to the crankcase. Even if I have many pictures from that element, I had difficulties to begin the work. Finally, I opted for the water pump cover. The base is now done but the pipe coming from the radiator which is casted with the cover is not yet done, because I don't know how to begin it. It has an elbow at its lower part, plus a provision for a petcock. It goes towards the crankcase, rendering it asymmetrical.  Maybe I will take a bit of brass and carve it. 
A solution will come, like for the pump's body but I don't know when.

 

 

259 Water pump cover.JPG

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Finally, the water pump cover is ready. Maybe not ready for paint, but there will be only cosmetic improvements, if any. The "long" tube was done with a full bar; the end on which the rubber hose will be attached is a short tube silver soldered on the bar. That assembly was then silver soldered on the cover you saw recently. Other small details were soft soldered. 
It's now the turn to the main body for the pump. Again a battle to get it, but not as bad as the one in the Capitol.

260 Water pump cover.JPG

261 Water pump cover.JPG

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  • 2 weeks later...

After a short vacation, the work resumed on the water pump. After the front cover, I began the rear part of the pump which is more or less flat. I silver soldered this plate to the "legs" which are attaching the pump to the block. I did a hole into that plate which is the axis for the impeller; it must be more or less aligned with the one from the generator. Rubber couplings are used at both ends as a solid shaft was not realistic due to the production variation.
As I did not know how to continue the rear part, I did the pump's front flange; on the picture, this part is on the floor near the block. Most probably, the part between the front flange and the back will be solid; then, once the exterior shape will be acceptable, I will do a large hole in the middle to save some weight.

262 Water pump body.JPG

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As you may imagine, I'm glad that the pump is ready. Such a small part and so complex! I'm pretty sure that it's not a 100% exact replicate of a real one; working with pictures is not quite easy. There is always one picture missing to see this or that detail or the relation between two elements!
The first picture is showing the 3 elements for the pump's body. The hole in the center is the "fil rouge" as with an inserted shaft I had at least the correct position of the 3 elements relative to each others.
The body on the second picture is ready and on the last two, the pump is installed on the crankcase. This time, the generator is in his correct position; it will be removed for the subsequent jobs which will be the fabrication of the two tubes between the pump and the crankcase and head and the long one located the other side.

263 pump body.JPG

264 Pump body.JPG

265 Completed pump.JPG

266 Completted pump.JPG

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Now the water pump could begin to work as I added the three water "tubes" which are indeed solid. Even if those tube are looking easy to do, they were not: the flange must be aligned to  the block and the pump; the radius must be tight (I did them by cutting slices into the material and silver soldered the tube) and the length must correspond. The long tube at the LH side should be parallel to the block at both axis; unfortunately, when looking at the picture, you will notice that it's not exactly parallel to the block but, from above or under, it's perfect. When the exhaust and intake manifolds will be installed, this flaw will be unnoticed.
To do the tubes, I removed the pump's cover. I will now do the shaft with the joints between the generator and pump.

268 Water tubes.JPG

267 Water tube.JPG

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On 1/24/2021 at 8:13 AM, John S. said:

Roger, this is beyond modeling. This is a work of art.

 

Very true, which has made me often wonder...how does one come up with an insurance value for Roger's wonderful creations? I don't believe he sells them, so there really wouldn't be a market derived valuation, but I'd certainly hope they would be covered for an appropriate amount. There are very few people in the world who are capable of such work.

Edited by JamesR (see edit history)
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Years ago, I had a visit from my insurance. At that time only the Avanti and the Toronado were ready; maybe the Mark II was in the works. If I remember well, there was an amount of  about $ 80'000.00 for the models. Frankly, I did not let modify the contract when the Mark II was finished. This is maybe something to do soon.

A (stupid?) question: how to put a value on that? It's like a painting: some are exchanged for millions when others have a $ 100.00 value or less. Basically, all are made with a little paint on a canvas...

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Sometimes the initial idea is good and then the realization not so. I wanted to do the flexible joints between the generator and the water pump. In fact, it's simple: two discs with "fingers" and a bit rubber in between. It would be easy to do them at a 1:8 scale, but at 1:12, the end result is so, so. The Dow Corning rubber (An ivory and a black thick liquid are mixes together; my product is about 40 years old!) is nice to do tires but for very small elements like that flexible joint, a reinforced rubber would be more appropriate, but I cannot machine that kind of material. Plus the fact that the "fingers" from the discs are not spaced exactly the same. 
The whole assembly (the shaft between both joints is still to be done) must be under slight pressure, otherwise the joints will not stay together!
Anyway, something is not bad: I added the "gland" for the lubrication of the water pump shaft; it's not bad looking. The gland, the joints and the shaft will be chromed. A lot of chromed parts were used on this engine.

269 Flexible joints.JPG

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41 minutes ago, Paulie9fingers said:

Roger it looks great from where I'm sitting

But not with a magnifying glass! You know that pictures are lying...Anyway, those joints will be melted into all the other elements from the model, therefore it's not a major annoyance.

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On 2/2/2021 at 2:47 AM, Roger Zimmermann said:

A (stupid?) question: how to put a value on that? It's like a painting: some are exchanged for millions when others have a $ 100.00 value or less. Basically, all are made with a little paint on a canvas...

Not a stupid question at all Roger. The materials may not be on the high range of value, but it's your TIME and the ENGINEERING that goes into each piece to make the whole product. These are truly works of art and are one off creations. There are very few people that can do this kind of fabrication of parts that small and with extreme detail and by hand no less.  Not to mention having them all come together to make a car.  You are truly gifted and have kept us all on the edge of our chairs as these works of art come together.

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Martin, thanks for your comments. You are right, the material costs are almost insignificant. It's just labor, which you wrote, or time. 

There are few people who can do and are willing to do something similar (not especially a car), spending years to get the "finished product". But there are also very few people who have to money and recognize what's behind the chrome or paint and would spend the right amount. Anyway, this is not my goal.

I'm glad I can entertain a bit people; if there would be no interest, I would not continue to publish my adventures. When looking at the number of views, it seems that I'm on the right way!

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Finally, those flexible joints are not too bad. I cleaned a bit more the flashes from the silicone rubber; once installed, the joints are decently looking. They even do their job as you can see at the water pump: the pump is not exactly aligned with the generator and looking at the joint, the upper "rubber" is thinner than at the bottom. If necessary, I can rotate the shaft but, as I had to make some compression at the joints, there is a lot of friction. Nevertheless, this is a static model and, when the carb will be installed, there will be no possibility to play with the shaft.
To accelerate the process with the silicone rubber, I heated it with the mold at about 100°C or more. The excess product took about two days to polymerize at room temperature!

270 Installed shaft.JPG

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Roger,

 

Gerald Wingrove made 1:20 scale models that were beautiful and authentic, sans the power seats, power windows. operable lights, etc, etc.   He was contracted to build these models and I am sure that his selling prices were expensive as he worked with museums, foundations and private individuals. 

 

It would be nice to be able to contact him to see what his cars sold for  for a value that you can put on your masterpieces.  There has to be someone who could evaluate the Avanti, Toronado and the Mark II for a real value.  All the insurance company has to do is follow the threads and see how much WORK, PLANNING and TIME went into these works of art.

 

There is Ken Foran who, like you, is a consumate modeler.  His Bell Hellicopter (in Brass) and his Model T are exquisit.  I wonder if contacting him may give you a lead on someone who can evaluate and assess the value of your models?  Gerald Wingrove has long retired to Spain.  I do not know if he is able to be contacted but he may  know of a source for valuation.  Louis Chernow in Missouri duplicated a Duesenberg in 1:6 scale with a running engine.  A very exquisit model that is stunning. It is here in the Craftsmanship Museum here in Carlsbad, CA.  I hear he is working on a Garwood tripple cocpit runabout with a WWI Liberty engine.  But we have not heard from him in quite a while.  And there are a few others, but the operative word here is......FEW.

 

Really.......putting a value on the models would be difficult for us out here as I have been following you for over 10 years, watching you painstakingly fight every battle, overcoming obsticles and finishing each part to perfection.  All without factory blue prints to see the actual part in true dimensions.  Who else but you Roger, could attain such fantastic results?  Maybe a handful of people inhabiting this world.  To all of us, they are worth a million !

 

Until we have a "shrinking machine" you are the only one that I know of doing these classics. 

You may not be interested in finding out what the models are worth as they are not for resale.  But to us out here, they are priceless.

 

Randy

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Gerald Wingrove is no more among us since about one year (or more?). I had some discussion last year with Ken Foran; I sent to him a bit cable for one of his projects. Anyway, except when the required model is built without  working mechanical like suspension, steering etc., the amount of hours can go out of the roof. As all my models were done without  a selling in mind, the set price is anyway totally subjective, like a painting done by a famous artist. Or a good way to wash money!

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I have been away from my 'official' computer and couldn't recall my login here. I could follow the work, but not communicate. Now, I can say that this is getting even more interesting as you proceed with the engine. Good to be here again.

I wouldn't venture a value. My cheapskate mentality would insult you. And anger the others that follow you, Roger. However, I am not a complete heathen, for I appreciate the things you do the best; educate, amaze us, show us  wonderfully amazing things over and over.  In other words, you share your special talents with us. Very special. Very.

 

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Thanks Pat and Dileep for your comments!

 

The pictured parts will be the transmission. The "thing" at left is the main case and the other one at right should be the junction between the case and the flywheel case. Some hammer blows are still needed as well as some more work. Like all elements, the beginning is sometimes rather crude.
No, the engine is not ready but I wanted to do something else. 

271 Transmission.JPG

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The last few days saw some improvements at the parts from the transmission. Elements were added at the main body; some more will come next. At first, I intended to adjust the main body to the flywheel cover; finally, I inserted the body into the cover. With this move, it will be easier to control distances and alignment. Both elements are not yet soldered; I will first add details on the RH side of the main body.

272 transmission.JPG

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I went back to page 1 night before last and started reading this whole thread.  Took me two nights to accomplish that. 

 

Roger, your skill, patience, determination, and artistic abilities are absolutely amazing!  As an engineer, I often overlook the artistic side of things and see anything mechanical as "if it works well, that is beauty."  Your work far surpasses it.  I spend my time in the aerospace field and am a bit jaded by mechanical masterpieces, but your work is absolutely breathtaking.  

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On 2/11/2021 at 3:24 PM, AURktman said:

I went back to page 1 night before last and started reading this whole thread.  Took me two nights to accomplish that. 

 

Wow! Did you were awake during the day? Anyway, thanks to have a look at my adventures since the begin! Thanks also for the appreciation if my little things...

 

The last details were added on the main body of the transmission. On the LH side: drain and refill plugs. On the RH side: 3 attaching points and the vertical surface for the locking yoke pin plate. On the V-12 and V-16, both front attaching points are used to attach the ratchet for the hand brake lever; on the V-8 cars, the two rear attaching points are used for the ratchet.
Now, I "just" have to attach the case to the flywheel cover...

273 Case.JPG

274 Case.JPG

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Stunning work Roger. And to do this without blueprints........just photos.  Years of automotive engineering have given you the experience and skills to "compute" how the part is made and assembled.  Not for the faint of heart.  As we all look on in awe, it is really amazing to see these minute parts come to "life".  From the raw brass to finished component, it is always amazement  to see the part in it's finished state.  

Can't wait to see the next installment............

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The main case was silver soldered to the flywheel cover. This operation was critical as the transmission must be in a good alignment with the engine. 
Now, I'm two steps away to have the transmission's case ready: the provision for the clutch lever on the LH side and the one for the starter motor on the RH side must be added. As I neglected to measure in detail both elements, I will have to rely on the many pictures I have to do something decent. 

275 Case.JPG

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