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Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12


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As I had some elements already done for the generator, I decided to continue with it before I'm going to the oil pan. A generator is a stupid round cylinder with some small details. Regarding the details, I did some: the screws to attach the pole pieces (they are fake, a word used frequently those last 4 years), the oiling funnel, also a fake, at the back cover, the small retaining plate for the bearing at the back cover, held with 3 screws. The difficulty I had was to determine the angular relation with each other. I think I'm not too bad. 
Another detail which cannot be overviewed: the air outlet tube, which is screwed on the generator; the inlet conduit will be done when I have the blocks and exhaust manifolds. Here too, I had to guess its position; it's not vertical but inclined towards the exterior. This why I cannot do it now, I have to wait for the other parts. 
There are still details to come: the cover over the slots at the back of the generator and both oiling cups (fakes) for the front and rear bearings in addition to the air inlet tube. 

228 Generator.JPG

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As the oil pan is attached to the transmission, I had first to continue with the transmission's flange. I had to "repair" it, by silver soldering a bit brass because I removed too much metal...It's not the first time, and not the last one!
Now that the points for the lower attaching bolts have been set, I began the oil pan. The location for the starter motor is not yet set ; it will be done later when the oil pan has more details done.
For the moment, I have two separate parts: the flange and the pan. Both will probably be soft soldered as such long thin stripes are very unstable when heat is applied.
I'm adding also a picture from a real part.

Oil pan fitted (2).JPG

229 Oil pan.JPG

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Looking good Roger. How did you make the air intake tube, is that a piece of solid stock that you cut on the lathe to get the taper and drilled a shallow hole for the illusion of it being an open tube or did you roll a piece of flat stock and solder it ?

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The outlet tube was a piece of solid stock. I did first a small hole into it the total length, then I used various drills to get a larger hole at the open end. With an adjustable chariot, I cut the outside and inside diameter when the desired angle was set. Of course, the inside diameter at that angle is just a fraction of the total length. 

Then I separated the tube from the stock. I hope that my explanation is understandable!

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23 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

The outlet tube was a piece of solid stock. I did first a small hole into it the total length, then I used various drills to get a larger hole at the open end. With an adjustable chariot, I cut the outside and inside diameter when the desired angle was set. Of course, the inside diameter at that angle is just a fraction of the total length. 

Then I separated the tube from the stock. I hope that my explanation is understandable!

 

Yep, it is

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The pan itself was continued by closing the front end. Before it was soldered to the assembly, I milled some slots to help positioning the cooling fins. After that, I silver soldered the fins and trimmed them.
The first pictures is showing the pan and the prepared fins; the second picture is self-explanatory. Further additions will be soft soldered.

230 Oil pan and fins.JPG

231 soldered fins.JPG

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After adding all the tiny details to the oil pan, it's now ready. Well, not exactly: I now have to drill all the needed holes to attach it to the crankcase; there are more than 30. Then, I can do the same at the crankcase. The original studs are 3/8", at 1:12, they will be 0.8mm.

232 Oil pan ready.JPG

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That is pretty. I love how the model matches the reference photos, and  you showing how much work actually is required for every piece of the project. Roger, you are a great modeler . 

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At first, I had not idea how to drill the numerous holes at the pan and into the crankcase. The easy method with a rule and tracing point is hardly applicable when so many holes must be drilled with a relative precision.
For the oil pan, I put it on a wood block, attached it with 4 screws, inserted the whole into a jaw. After checking that the pan was parallel to the bank, I could move the carriage the desired distance and do the holes, this is the first picture.
The oil pan was then used as a template to replicate the holes into the block. To avoid unwanted rotational movement, I had to adapt a plate at the front. This way, the assembly was stabilized, second picture.
Now, all the holes are ready to accept the studs; for the moment, I'm using regular screws to attach the pan to the crankcase. On the original engine, studs were used almost everywhere because aluminum is not strong enough for regular screws (ask the Cadillac designers why they did not used that method on the Northstar engine and previous aluminum ones...)
As you can see, the flange for the transmission has been trimmed; it's ready to be soldered to the transmission once it's done.
Now, I will do the engine blocks. Fortunately, they are the same left and right; it will be serie work!
 

233 Oil pan drilling.JPG

234 Crankcase drilling.JPG

235 Oil pan and crankcase.JPG

236 Oil pan and crankcase.JPG

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Even if the engine blocks are rather easy to do, I spent more time as anticipated. Sometimes things are not going the way I like!
By the way, when I'm hearing the name "engine block", I do see in my head something rather bulky and heavy. This is not the case with the V-12 and V-16 from that time. I'm first adding pictures from the real thing. The block is indeed the element into the pistons are moving. If you look at the second picture, you see that the cylinders are like a tube protruding from the block. Probably that strange solution was adequate for the low output and RPMs from that time; for me it has an evident lack of rigidity. After all, those engine were more intended for comfort than for power .
The last picture is from my blocks, way from finished.

Cylinder block fit (1).JPG

IMG_1053.JPG

237 Egine blocks.JPG

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Each engine block has 6 expansion plugs; I reproduced them as good as I could. Then came the moment I have to drill the holes into the crankcase, securing partly the blocks to the crankcase. To have a consistent drilling, I did 2 supports with scrap material to have an horizontal surface for one block. For the other block I certainly will have to do two other supports because they are not reversible. Furthermore, I will need them again when I will drill the heads, blocks and crankcase.
As you see, the blocks must be closed at the top. As long as drilling is required, the "cover" will not be soldered.

238 Drilling the crankcase.JPG

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The engine blocks are ready. Finally, I soft soldered the "lid" earlier as foreseen because I will need the completed blocks to do the cylinder heads. At the side of the block, 13 studs will be used to attach the heads!
On the picture, there are 2 smaller holes next to the ones figuring the cylinders. These holes are to temporarily attach the blocks to the crankcase with 2 screws each. At the back of each block, there are 5 tabs. These are needed to attach the tube hiding the spark plug wires.
Now, I'm planning the heads. Of course, the internals (valves and so on) will not be reproduced; if the heads towards the outside are fairly simple, the sides towards the center are much more complicated. Sure, once the garnish cover will be installed, it will be difficult to see that side from the heads, but I would hate to oversimplify the heads. I'm attaching a picture showing all those shapes.

239 Blocks ready.JPG

cylinder heads repaired (34).JPG

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