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Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12


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As I had some elements already done for the generator, I decided to continue with it before I'm going to the oil pan. A generator is a stupid round cylinder with some small details. Regarding the details, I did some: the screws to attach the pole pieces (they are fake, a word used frequently those last 4 years), the oiling funnel, also a fake, at the back cover, the small retaining plate for the bearing at the back cover, held with 3 screws. The difficulty I had was to determine the angular relation with each other. I think I'm not too bad. 
Another detail which cannot be overviewed: the air outlet tube, which is screwed on the generator; the inlet conduit will be done when I have the blocks and exhaust manifolds. Here too, I had to guess its position; it's not vertical but inclined towards the exterior. This why I cannot do it now, I have to wait for the other parts. 
There are still details to come: the cover over the slots at the back of the generator and both oiling cups (fakes) for the front and rear bearings in addition to the air inlet tube. 

228 Generator.JPG

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As the oil pan is attached to the transmission, I had first to continue with the transmission's flange. I had to "repair" it, by silver soldering a bit brass because I removed too much metal...It's not the first time, and not the last one!
Now that the points for the lower attaching bolts have been set, I began the oil pan. The location for the starter motor is not yet set ; it will be done later when the oil pan has more details done.
For the moment, I have two separate parts: the flange and the pan. Both will probably be soft soldered as such long thin stripes are very unstable when heat is applied.
I'm adding also a picture from a real part.

Oil pan fitted (2).JPG

229 Oil pan.JPG

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The outlet tube was a piece of solid stock. I did first a small hole into it the total length, then I used various drills to get a larger hole at the open end. With an adjustable chariot, I cut the outside and inside diameter when the desired angle was set. Of course, the inside diameter at that angle is just a fraction of the total length. 

Then I separated the tube from the stock. I hope that my explanation is understandable!

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23 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

The outlet tube was a piece of solid stock. I did first a small hole into it the total length, then I used various drills to get a larger hole at the open end. With an adjustable chariot, I cut the outside and inside diameter when the desired angle was set. Of course, the inside diameter at that angle is just a fraction of the total length. 

Then I separated the tube from the stock. I hope that my explanation is understandable!

 

Yep, it is

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The pan itself was continued by closing the front end. Before it was soldered to the assembly, I milled some slots to help positioning the cooling fins. After that, I silver soldered the fins and trimmed them.
The first pictures is showing the pan and the prepared fins; the second picture is self-explanatory. Further additions will be soft soldered.

230 Oil pan and fins.JPG

231 soldered fins.JPG

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At first, I had not idea how to drill the numerous holes at the pan and into the crankcase. The easy method with a rule and tracing point is hardly applicable when so many holes must be drilled with a relative precision.
For the oil pan, I put it on a wood block, attached it with 4 screws, inserted the whole into a jaw. After checking that the pan was parallel to the bank, I could move the carriage the desired distance and do the holes, this is the first picture.
The oil pan was then used as a template to replicate the holes into the block. To avoid unwanted rotational movement, I had to adapt a plate at the front. This way, the assembly was stabilized, second picture.
Now, all the holes are ready to accept the studs; for the moment, I'm using regular screws to attach the pan to the crankcase. On the original engine, studs were used almost everywhere because aluminum is not strong enough for regular screws (ask the Cadillac designers why they did not used that method on the Northstar engine and previous aluminum ones...)
As you can see, the flange for the transmission has been trimmed; it's ready to be soldered to the transmission once it's done.
Now, I will do the engine blocks. Fortunately, they are the same left and right; it will be serie work!
 

233 Oil pan drilling.JPG

234 Crankcase drilling.JPG

235 Oil pan and crankcase.JPG

236 Oil pan and crankcase.JPG

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Even if the engine blocks are rather easy to do, I spent more time as anticipated. Sometimes things are not going the way I like!
By the way, when I'm hearing the name "engine block", I do see in my head something rather bulky and heavy. This is not the case with the V-12 and V-16 from that time. I'm first adding pictures from the real thing. The block is indeed the element into the pistons are moving. If you look at the second picture, you see that the cylinders are like a tube protruding from the block. Probably that strange solution was adequate for the low output and RPMs from that time; for me it has an evident lack of rigidity. After all, those engine were more intended for comfort than for power .
The last picture is from my blocks, way from finished.

Cylinder block fit (1).JPG

IMG_1053.JPG

237 Egine blocks.JPG

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Each engine block has 6 expansion plugs; I reproduced them as good as I could. Then came the moment I have to drill the holes into the crankcase, securing partly the blocks to the crankcase. To have a consistent drilling, I did 2 supports with scrap material to have an horizontal surface for one block. For the other block I certainly will have to do two other supports because they are not reversible. Furthermore, I will need them again when I will drill the heads, blocks and crankcase.
As you see, the blocks must be closed at the top. As long as drilling is required, the "cover" will not be soldered.

238 Drilling the crankcase.JPG

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The engine blocks are ready. Finally, I soft soldered the "lid" earlier as foreseen because I will need the completed blocks to do the cylinder heads. At the side of the block, 13 studs will be used to attach the heads!
On the picture, there are 2 smaller holes next to the ones figuring the cylinders. These holes are to temporarily attach the blocks to the crankcase with 2 screws each. At the back of each block, there are 5 tabs. These are needed to attach the tube hiding the spark plug wires.
Now, I'm planning the heads. Of course, the internals (valves and so on) will not be reproduced; if the heads towards the outside are fairly simple, the sides towards the center are much more complicated. Sure, once the garnish cover will be installed, it will be difficult to see that side from the heads, but I would hate to oversimplify the heads. I'm attaching a picture showing all those shapes.

239 Blocks ready.JPG

cylinder heads repaired (34).JPG

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As for every part, there must be a base on which I can get the construction up. There is no difference here. I did a base and the wall which is on the exhaust/intake side. That's for the easy part, the rest will be more labor intensive. I continue with the exterior side (a picture from the real head is included) by adding the element just above the base and into which the 13 outside bolts are attaching the head to the block. As a casting an easy part, but without this possibility a bit more complicated: I did first the base without the "barrels" for the bolts. I drilled the holes at a diameter large enough to insert the barrels. Those were silver soldered to the part which is looking like a rod. 
After trimming the assembly, I realized that it will be more clever to soft solder it on the base part. Therefore, the parts on the pictures will be set aside for the moment. I will now go the the spark plug's side, the really complex one.

2013-10-04 at 12-40-39.jpg

240 cylinder heads.JPG

241 heads in progress.JPG

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Well, the skill can always be improved by training. The patience, that's different: you have it or not! It seems that I got an extra portion when I was born. As the total properties (positive and negative ones) are the same to all humans (this is my theory), I must have a deficit at something else! For example: sport activities: what an horror! Snow? Singin in the rain? beurk!

Edited by Roger Zimmermann
modified sentence (see edit history)
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The cylinder heads are getting more difficult as anticipated. By looking at the pictures, there are many symmetrical surfaces, easy to do. Easy? well, some surfaces are at an angle, other surfaces are at a different angle(s). The easy part, at least it was my impression: the "pockets", connected with a tube to the base of the heads have at the back a vertical surface going to the base. The pockets are separated by the shape allowing the spark plugs to be installed; the angles are different. How to conciliate both? I still don't have the answer.
I drilled first the holes for the tubes; in the original engine, the push rods are inside those tubes. Then I bent some flat brass for the pockets. I began to makes elongated holes for the spark plug's surfaces and I realized that this method was going nowhere. 
Then I did another piece replicating the surfaces for the spark plus, thinking that I could attach the pockets on that. I attempted to shape a pocket with thinner brass and I had to admit that the best destination for that pocket was the waste bin.
Then, I took some thicker material which should be the pockets. I did the holes for the tubes and the grooves for the spark plugs surface and I'm there, not knowing (for the moment) how to continue.
With a 3-D program, the parts were already done, but it's not my way to modelling!

242 first attempt.JPG

243 second attempt.JPG

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Don't worry, Paulie, it will never happen!

 

For those who not sleep at night until I found a solution how to continue the heads, the relief is there: I succeed! I did first a small sample with the conflicting angles; this is on the LH from the first picture. This tiny exercise was a great help to see the relationship between the sections concerned. From then, I could continue, modifying the base already done. I had to silver solder tiny pieces to close the gaps and to correct the shape. Once done, that assembly was silver soldered to the head's base.
The second picture is showing the "pockets on top; both drill bits are temporarily replacing the future tubes for the push rods, 16 per side. 
Some trimming must be done to the pocket assembly as it's too massive now. 
I just have to do the same at the other head...

244 another attempt.JPG

245 solution found.JPG

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Perseverence is your middle name. Or tenacious. Whichever, we are all the beneficiaries of your results. Sometimes during the Covid-daze, when I need a little bit of something that's going along, ever forward, your posts supply a very welcome sense of joy and pleasure. Roger, you are a hero in troubled times. Thanks so much for your efforts.

And, I hope the time comes soon when we can all enjoy your marvelous models without a veil of worry about the virus. Stay safe everyone. 

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With the exception of many holes, for example the ones for the manifold's studs, the first head is ready. There is some small cosmetic details to be addressed; they will be done later.
I will now adapt this head on one block before I'm continuing with the other head. 
On some pictures, you will see that I added some "décor" at both ends of the head.

 

246 Head ready.JPG

247 Head ready.JPG

248 Head ready.JPG

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Thanks Marin and Paul! Yes, almost all details will be hidden once the cover between both heads is installed. That will be the "concealed beauty"!

 

Did the necessary holes into one block using the head as a template. I could not resist to do a picture or two to show how tall this engine was. On top of the heads, the valve covers (which are almost as tall as the heads) will accentuate that incredible height. Imagine such an engine into a modern car: even if some recent vehicle would have an engine bay long enough, a hood would never fit!

249 Tall engine.JPG

250 Tall engine.JPG

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Both heads are ready, with the exception of minor cosmetic additions. Those heads are symmetrical and were manufactured without to know on which side they will go. Therefore, the water outlet to the radiator is on both ends. As there is no radiator at the rear, the water outlets are closed with a plate attached with screws. One threaded hole is also closed with a screw, otherwise the oil vapors would escape from that hole. The other hole on the same side is emerging in the open area from the heads, therefore no screw is used. 
Each plate has a round recess; to replicate it, I did each plate with two parts, one with a hole of the proper diameter, soft soldered on a plane plate.
In the front of the engine, there is on each cylinder head end a casting with has two functions: a tube for the water and also an engine ventilator pipe. When I was looking at the pictures, I did not understand why the water outlet was associated with the ventilator tube; fortunately, one of the Johan's pictures was showing the back from the casting, explaining the mystery.
This is what I will begin now, maybe without the ventilator pipe until I can install the engine on the frame. If I'm doing that casting part now is because the valve covers are following the shape of the casting. A real casting picture is attached for comprehension. 

251 end of the heads.JPG

2013-10-04 at 12-40-17.jpg

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The minor parts in front of the heads are now over. The ventilator pipes are not yet done, because I need the engine on the frame do do them. I don't know exactly at which "altitude" they end, I will find a way to determine that. In any case, they don't go extend further down than the lower frame rail.
The oil vapors were sucked between the end of the heads and that "new" part at the crack which can be seen on the second picture. On the real engines, that space was greater because the casting was hollow.
The water outlets have a pin at their top. The fluted rubber hoses will be inserted on those pins. 
To service the hydraulic lifters it was just necessary to remove the valve covers attached with 10 screws at the heads. On the model, I should need very long 0.5mm screws to attach the valve covers. As they would be unpractical and difficult to manufacture, the screws will be dummy ones and the covers attached with one central screw hidden by the oil filler caps.

252 water outlets.JPG

253 Water outlets.JPG

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This will be the last up date for this year. I began the valve covers some days ago by shaping a brass plate as a "U" and silver soldering the shaped ends. As too often, it happen that I did one cover a tad too long! Fortunately, I could reheat one end, push the end cover away, shorten the main body and reattach the end cover.
The base plate will be soft soldered because at this stage, silver soldering is too risky with such long parts.
Once the main part and base will be soldered, I will have to decide how I will add the ridges allowing (on the real part) the screws to go through and torqued to the head. On the attached picture, you will see 10 holes which are for those ridges. I don't know yet if I will do a channel into the body for each ridge (a risky work) or if I will shape the ridges to conform the body, which will be less problematic if one part is bad. 
I'm also attaching a picture from a real valve cover for comprehension. The shiny part on the top will be done separately and soft soldered to the top of the cover. As the valve covers are very prominent parts from the engine, they must be right!
Thanks for all who are following my adventure; I'm wishing you an Happy New Year! 

254 Valve covers.JPG

2013-10-04 at 12-41-14.jpg

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Roger, the valve covers of those engines sure are prominent, and a good thing, too! The real ones (and when done your models) are plain beautiful machinery. You will amaze us next year with the end results, I'm certain. Till then, have a Happy New Year, and the same to all the rest of you reading this. And, good riddance to 2020, hey?

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It's been a wonderful journey following you again this year. Your work is beyond amazing. Keep up the great work, Roger.

Have a safe and healthy New Year.

Thanks for all the time you spend writing this journey for all to enjoy. I look forward to every post.

Tom

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I hope everybody had a good start in that year 2021.
Good news for the first update from the year. From a scale model forum, I got various suggestions how to do the bosses or ridges; while looking at those ideas I got the right solution: I attached the valve covers to a plate. This set-up allowed putting the assembly in the vice for milling. As the brass in sheets has not the same characteristic than the bulk rods, it’s more difficult to machine, therefore I had to be careful and mill only 0.1mm each pass until I had the 5 slices each side. 
To have the ridges or bosses perpendicular to the base, I finished the slices with a file. Then I prepared the ridges with round stock with one hole at the upper end to insert a screw I had to machine myself as the ones I have don’t have the suitable dimension. As they are dummy screws, they will just be glued into the holes after plating.
Now, I can prepare the décor for the top of the covers.

255 Milling the slits.JPG

256 Almost ready.JPG

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More wonderful work, Roger.  In addition to your great craftsmanship, I can't get over how consistently you work!  There are many project threads on the forums where weeks or even months go by with no progress.  With yours, I know I can check in every week or so, and always find that something new has been accomplished.  Chapeau!

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Thanks Neil! Not only on this forum but on others I'm active too, some people are beginning something and disappear. Life is sometimes not kind with illness, job's change, lack of interest/money and so on. I'm grateful that I had not too many set-back in my life.

There are period I'm doing nothing, when we are going to our vacation's house. Sometimes a good opportunity to see and do something different!

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