Jump to content

Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12


Recommended Posts

The last days I prepared and added the ridges on the side of the crankcase. Of course, my crankcase is not looking exactly the same as the original one, but the ridges will have the studs to attach the engine blocks.
I added also the flanges for the fuel pump and the breather; there are some small details on the block; they will be added later as I intend to soft solder them. 
Thanks to Johan (member of the Cadillac club) from the Netherland: he sent me a load of pictures from the block without accessories as well as from the transmission and other elements. I'm especially grateful for his pictures from the block; I'm now in a position to continue with the back. 

212 more details.JPG

213 more details.JPG

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

The last days I prepared and added the ridges on the side of the crankcase. Of course, my crankcase is not looking exactly the same as the original one, but the ridges will have the studs to attach the engine blocks.
I added also the flanges for the fuel pump and the breather; there are some small details on the block; they will be added later as I intend to soft solder them. 
Thanks to Johan (member of the Cadillac club) from the Netherland: he sent me a load of pictures from the block without accessories as well as from the transmission and other elements. I'm especially grateful for his pictures from the block; I'm now in a position to continue with the back. 

212 more details.JPG

213 more details.JPG

Roger 

That is impressive!  You, sir, are a master.

 

Frank

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Everyone should take just a minute and go back 10+ years by selecting "first" for this thread and remembering where you were and what you were thinking when you saw Roger mold that first tire.  I remember being caught off guard as it was just a stunning result of an involved process. My mind slowing came to grips with the level of detail at such a small level. I started to extrapolate from there the amount of work that would be required for the whole car and it was a rather overwhelming moment.  I think even more impressive is that there was always another amazing moment waiting just around the corner as Roger brought more parts to life.  What a wonderful, wonderful trip it has been since then.

 

Thanks Roger!

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Well Jeff, I suppose that most were surprised with the time that so many details can be added to a scale model and that was sticking to that project while most of the viewers would have quit and do something else!

It seems that you are appreciate the trip; as somebody else said, the interesting part is the journey, not the goal!

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, Luv2Wrench said:

Everyone should take just a minute and go back 10+ years by selecting "first" for this thread and remembering where you were and what you were thinking when you saw Roger mold that first tire.  I remember being caught off guard as it was just a stunning result of an involved process. My mind slowing came to grips with the level of detail at such a small level. I started to extrapolate from there the amount of work that would be required for the whole car and it was a rather overwhelming moment.  I think even more impressive is that there was always another amazing moment waiting just around the corner as Roger brought more parts to life.  What a wonderful, wonderful trip it has been since then.

 

Thanks Roger!

I think I have started at page 1 and went through the entire thread 4 or 5 times, I'm just as amazed every time I do it.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks to the new pictures I have, the planning for the rear of the crankcase went without too much difficulties. If I had them at the begin of the crankcase's construction, I could have bent the sides at the rear to form the engine supports. Therefore, I had to cut the excess material at the rear and add "ears". Then I add the wall (which may not be the appropriate word for that) at the end of the engine blocks. 
The flywheel housing was done with a flat piece of brass shaped to the proper diameter and silver soldered to the end flange. I was ready to drill the holes to attach the transmission; fortunately, I realized that I could not drill the hole at the transmission's flange with enough precision with the flywheel housing attached to the crankcase. 
The flange for the transmission is rather thick; of course, I had not the proper material available, therefore I silver soldered 2 pieces of .8mm together, getting this way the proper thickness. The flange at the transmission is not circular; the indentations will be done later, as well as the shape allowing the starter motor to be attached.
I pre-drilled the holes to both elements; the right diameter's holes can be done later.
The next job was to adapt the flywheel housing to the existing construction, taking care to be square; finally that sub-assembly was silver soldered to the crankcase. Some excess soldering is still not removed; this will be done later.
Many elements must be added: the engine supports, the flange for the vacuum pump and so on. Some will be silver soldered; then, as the heat needed to get the proper temperature for each soldering task is getting indecent, remaining small details will be soft soldered. 

214 Flywheel housing.JPG

215 Soldered housing.JPG

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/7/2020 at 11:40 AM, Luv2Wrench said:

Roger brought more parts to life.  What a wonderful, wonderful trip it has been since then.

 

I can't agree more. I find Rogers model making just amazing. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

This project is as wonderful as the others in your collection, Roger. I still thrill to the craftsmanship and the seemingly endless and novel approaches to the different parts. And, somehow or other, I'm finding myself rooting for you to simply continue onward once the chassis and running gear are done. What body do you think would be the one..........?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The flywheel housing is flat at the top to allow the support for some features to be attached. To have a precise dimension and to be parallel with the bottom, I milled that surface.
I added then various flanges: the one for the water pump, on the RH side of the engine and the one for a small cover. The mechanic, during maintenance, could rotate that cover to check the timing point.
Two ridges were also added; they house the guiding bar to assemble the transmission to the engine.
The next elements added to the crankcase will be soft soldered.
The last picture is showing a great help: since one year we have a "new" dog; he comes sometimes to me to help, or at least its his thinking.

216 Milling the flywheel housing.JPG

217 Details added.JPG

218 Details added.JPG

Helping dog.JPG

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Roger, I'm curious to know how you're soldering that. I assume silver solder. But also, what method of heat application, if any. How do you keep the heat localized so you don't melt a previous solder joint? It seems like even the smallest torch would melt everything else you're previously done. 

 

Regards,

Dan 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Dan, that's the problem with an assembly requiring multiple heating. I have a simple torch with butane/propane gas (see the attached picture with the Mark II frame). On a compact element, it's impossible to heat only the place to silver solder, therefore the danger that everything is just a gob of soldering and brass exists. I'm using various methods to keep the "new" part to be soldered, like third hand, screws or luck. You have to know that the temperature required to silver solder a new element is a tad lower  (don't ask how much) than to get the old soldering liquid again.

On that crankcase, there is so much surface that the heat stay more or less localized or don't affect too much the surrounding elements, but the required heat is consequent and I'm trying to limit the risk. This is the reason why I will use now the soft solder for the next operations. The danger still exist to shift an element already soft soldered; that's maybe my habit to "play" with such subsequent soldering which prevents failures!

218 Blowtorch.JPG

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a member of "the continually amazed" fans of your work. One thing that strikes me is just how carefully you must look at a car to achieve this level of detail.  To be sure,  you must become intimately familiar with every component as you build.  While I am stunned by your model building skills I am equally impressed by your ability to carefully observe your subject matter. 

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Eric! I have the chance to have hundreds pictures from the brakes, frame engine and transmission. Probably you saw at the beginning form this project that I was in Germany to measure and take pictures from the frame & engine. All the small details were either forgotten or unnoticed; thanks to those many pictures, I can see them. Pictures are difficult to deal with because of the lens' distortion but they help a lot. Most of the time, I'm spending more time to calculate/evaluate/establish dimensions than to do the part! More than once, when something is completed, I see that there is an error! I was aware of that, it's just the game as it is.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

A few elements were added since the last update: the "ears" for the rear engine supports and the provisions to push the colder water coming from the water pump to the LH cylinder block. There is a tube across the rear crankcase; steel tubes are attached to the flange.

The LH flange was relatively easy to do; by accident, this is the side I have the most pictures. The issue with the other side: the 2 threaded holes are not vertical but at about 55° because the tube connected to the water pump has to go down. 

If I was satisfied with the flange from the LH side, the RH one is not the best achievement at the crankcase: the holes are not at the desired angle (I could not do better) and the whole configuration is questionable. Several small errors at the parts already done are probably the cause of this shortcoming.

The next step is to do the mounting pedestal for the vacuum pump and for an unidentified (for the moment) device; this is the last picture.

219 More details.JPG

220 detail soldered.JPG

221 RH side soldered.JPG

2013-10-04 at 12-40-45.jpg

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

Due to various other duties, the up date is rather late.
I saw rather quickly that to do the elements I wanted to add on the crankcase, I had to "close" it because those elements are like a continuation of the upper deck. It's now done; the 16 holes are just for the fun because in reality, the upper crankcase has a different aspect; a picture is included.
Maybe you'll notice that I have another quarter: while removing the front seat from my '72 de Ville, I found that quarter which is different from the usual ones: it was "stamped" in 2004 for Florida. I don't know if that quarter can be used in the whole USA or just in Florida.

222 Closed crankcase.JPG

Crank case as found and empty (1) .JPG

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Egads! No wonder we are going broke over here. All of our money is in Switzerland! 

I like the holes in the deck of the crankcase. But, in reference to the picture of the full sized one, did those things leak much oil? With heat expansion and contraction the outer edge looks like a good path for that Texas crude to exit the engine and reenter the earth as it falls to the ground. Just wondering. 

Great work again, Roger. You simply brighten the day when you show us something new.  Pat

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

@ keiser31: thanks for the explanation about the money!

 

@ Pat: Don't tell it to your big chief!

Compared to actual standards, that engine was probably not very rigid. The huge crankcase is a wonder of aluminum casting; anyway, I don't think there was too much oil leak because there is not a lot of pressure inside. In "our" case, the gasket is much higher than the crankshaft. The oil pan was probably tight too: it's also aluminum (same expansion and contraction rate) and there is a great number of bolts; you'll see it later. 

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites


The rear of the crankcase is finished. Of course, there are some holes do be drilled, but not before the various accessories are ready because the holes on the flanges from the accessories will be used as a template to drill the base.
At the front, there is a built-in casting for the generator mounting. Here too, I'm needing the generator's flange to continue. Therefore, I have to partially begin the generator.

223 details, details.JPG

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Indeed, the flange for the generator should have been done much earlier when the case for the distribution was not yet attached to the block, because I could not drill the holes for the attaching bolts. I had to work backwards, finishing the spacer and generator's mounting flange. With that, I could drill approximate holes into the case for the bolts. I also understood why there is a ridge on that case: one of the attaching bolts is not inside the case; therefore the ridge was necessary. It's also a convenient place to stamp the engine number.
The first picture is showing the soldered flange; the second one the partially built generator, temporarily "installed" on the crankcase.
There are a few details to be added till the crankcase is considered as ready.

224 Flange for the gen.JPG

225 With the generator.JPG

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

The last small details on the crankcase have been added: the ridge for the visual oil level; 6 inverted "T"s and 4 tiny ridges like an equal. What is the purpose of those small elements? Maybe needed at the foundry or during the machining of the crankcase. One inverted "T" is thicker than the others; it would be interesting to know the reason.
On several pictures I have from a V-12 engine, those elements are also present.
After a good cleaning of the crankcase, I applied a coat of primer. It will most probably be damaged during the drilling of all the needed holes but the difficult places will not suffer. Of course, before the final painting some improvements will be made; it's now too early to do them now.

226 Crankcase ready.JPG

227 Crankcase ready.JPG

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites

It's also available in the US from Dupli-color. But not Switzerland! If you can buy it in England is of no value to me, shipping aerosols by post is not allowed. 

Anyway, as my models are not exposed to harsh environment, I have indeed never had an adhesion problem. I just have to clean the parts very well before priming. 

Anyway, thanks for the comment! 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...