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Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12


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I am, as always, floored by the quality of the work you do with such simple methods. Simple meaning oldtime craftsmanship instead of a bank of high tech machinery and computer guided wizardry. Kudos, Roger.

And, most of the old ladder frames I've ever fooled around with were fairly limber- I believe it was useful in letting the autos adapt themselves to the imperfect road surfaces of the early days. Were they very ridgid, the metal would have developed cracks and become useless very quickly. 

 

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Thanks Pat! It seems that you are sharing my opinion: scale modeling is to be done with a minimum of equipment; CNC machines, 3-D printers are just for people who can perform a great job on a computer but have two left hands!

About the lack of rigidity: cars from that time was an evolution from chariots; they could resist to the flexion but not to torsional efforts. Only a few years later came the X reinforcements and enhanced rigidity. Cars manufacturers had to learn!

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On 8/10/2020 at 6:40 AM, Roger Zimmermann said:

What's next? I think it's now a good opportunity to begin the engine, it's will be so easy to do!

 


LOL, I'm sure there's nothing to it 😉

The chassis looks great

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Thanks Paulie!

 

As I wrote some days ago, I began the engine. But, with what? There are 5 main elements for that engine: the oil pan (no, I will not do it in aluminum like the original), the crankcase (same remark), both engine blocks, both heads and the valve covers. For all those parts, I have only a few dimensions, not enough to do something right now. The drawings in the shop manuals are somewhat distorted, I cannot rely entirely on that. Obviously, I cannot wait until factory blueprints are landing on my desk, but it would be nice to have them. As Cadillac or GM is not very cooperative with that ("No, we have nothing" what a lie!), I have to do something engine related.
Searching various offers for parts on eBay, I found a front engine cover for sale. No, I don't intend to buy it, but there were 2 very interesting pictures with the camera almost perpendicular to the cover. There are still distortions; its my task to rearrange the dimensions. 
As you can guess, I began that front cover. It will be very helpful when I will begin the crankcase at the case's shape for the generator gearing can be copied from the cover.
This cover has another function: the front engine supports are riveted to it, it's another benefit debuting with that part: it will give me the position of the engine on the frame. 

Two pictures are attached: the cover I found, and the cover the way it is today. Some minor elements must be done; the engine supports must be added too.

Front cover.jpg

184 Front cover.JPG

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Very nice

 

I don't know if it is an optical illusion, but in the photo it looks like the "finger" that sticks out on the mount on the left side should be mounted in a recessed area at the same level as the perimeter flange.

1278654156_Frontcover.jpg.0b0e739785bc0189b5e73974a4dac244.jpg

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Now you see how difficult it is to evaluate the shape from an object with one or more pictures! The encircled part is indeed not in a recess but is, with a offset, on the elevated surface. I have other pictures to prove it, fortunately.

 

Front cover4.JPG

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Paulie, when I read your post and looked at the picture- I thought you'd nailed it. Then, Roger, the master and eagle eyed observer showed his picture and proved to me (and you) that the eye is easily fooled. 

And, Roger didn't have to go back and rebuild his great part. 

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I have a good number of pictures from that part. Before I just began to cut a bit of brass, I spent probably one day to interpret the dimensions I recorded in Germany, the ones I could evaluate in the shop manuals (I have 2: 30-31 and 32-33): basically the same engine during those 4 years, but as I reported before, the drawings are somewhat distorted. At the end, I could put basic dimensions on my sketch. However, from time to time, a major detail is escarping my eyes, but not this time!

Generally speaking: pictures are always hard to interpret, no matter how they are done. A look at the real thing is always better, but at 400 miles away from home, not quite practical! There are maybe other V-12 and V-16 in Europe, but most details cannot be seen when the vehicle is completed. It was a real chance to be able to see that frame and engine before the body was on it.

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Thanks Dileep! To go through all those pages is requiring a lot of time, thanks doing that. Indeed, I'm also an amateur model maker; with practice, I got maybe a tad better than the average! I'm glad if you can find inspiration/solutions with what I'm showing.

 

The supports, rivetted on the front cover, are only partly symmetrical. The first parts I did were both recipients for the rubber cushions. On the model, there will be no rubber as the engine will turn vibration free!
The next task was to silver solder the attaching plate to the recipients. To facilitate the job, I used the third hand as the plates could not stay vertical without aid. The first pictures are showing the process. The "fingers" from the third hand were hot at the end, but not enough to damage them.
Then I shaped the attaching plates to their respective location. I only guessed the distance between the base and the lower end of the cover; if the engine will be too low, some washers will help. By looking at my pictures, it seems that I'm not too far away from the correct dimension.
Then, I added the reinforcement ribs. The last ones will be soft soldered; indeed, they are here just for the show.
The last two pictures are showing the front cover with supports (attached with screws for the moment) and how that assembly is looking on or into the frame. Just imagine the engine behind it!

186 silver soldering.JPG

187 Silver soldering.JPG

188 Cover with supports.JPG

189 Support on the frame.JPG

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After riveting the engine supports to the cover and adding the sealing surface for the oil pan (attached with silver solder and false rivets), the front engine cover is finished. It was time to do the pulley for the fan and harmonic balancer. This simple part became a complex affair every Englishman could be proud of it. Why the complication? Well, I like when pulleys can be rotated. However, I dislike when they are turning like an egg. Everyone accustomed to work on a lathe knows that when a part get machined on one side and then the other side, chance that both machined elements are perfectly concentric is an illusion as the chuck is not a precision tool, especially if it was used and abused which is the case on my lathe.
This fact let to design the various part in such a way that out of round is practically eliminated, but it requires more sub-assemblies.
What will be the velocity of that shaft? Well, it will turn as quickly as one will be able to let it turn with the engine crank handle! If you are good looking at the harmonic balancer, you will notice the provision for the crank handle.
In the real life, I'm wondering how easy or hard it was to turn over the V-16 with a crank handle…
The first picture is showing the cover and in front of it the pulley/harmonic balancer; the second one is less glamorous: it's the back of the cover with the bearing to guide the small shaft. The third one is the assembly from both elements.

190 Support and pulley.JPG

191 Back side.JPG

192 Support and harmonic balancer.JPG

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Such interesting and detailed work. Then all that to have the pulleys turn without wobble.

I always appreciate the work, and the time you spend posting, even though I don't comment too often.

Keith

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Roger your work is always impeccable. I have followed your other builds with great interest. This model reminds me of the show chassis  Cadillac would be debuting at the Auto Salons from the Thirties. Wonderful work as always. John

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On 8/11/2020 at 2:14 AM, Roger Zimmermann said:

Thanks Pat! It seems that you are sharing my opinion: scale modeling is to be done with a minimum of equipment; CNC machines, 3-D printers are just for people who can perform a great job on a computer but have two left hands!


This is true, I don’t have a lathe or a mill or the ability/skill to use either one. I’m also young so I will have all that one day but for now I rely on all the high-tech stuff to make my models, but I have mastered soldering brass and casting tires! 😂

BC3558C8-740F-40A3-B651-9FE60723877F.jpeg

9FB91700-6E4E-40A9-97EF-93AE8A39001E.jpeg

Edited by Murco
Fixed wording (see edit history)
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Murco, this wheel would be very difficult to do with conventional methods; or is a wheel you bought that way?

 

Usually, when I'm building a model, I have no logic with what to do first and with what I should continue. It's most of the time dependent if I'm still needing more info or whatever. Sometimes, I'm continuing with some logic: after the pulley on the crank shaft, why not do the pulley for the fan?
The people who designed the pulley and hub almost 90 years ago had certainly the idea that somebody would replicate that engine; therefore, to add some difficulties, they designed a hub with ribs for the fan! The first picture is showing that.
I had two solutions: close the eyes and do a smooth hub or take the challenge to add the ribs. I choose the difficult one without knowing how to do it. To complicate the matter, that casted hub has on one side the pulley and on the other side the flange on which the fan is attached. Doing that in one piece is not possible. I did the flange and hub as one part and the pulley as another one.
Then I counted the number of ribs: there are more than 8, base on a picture from the original pulley, I decided that there were 12. After doing that part and comparing with the above picture, there are maybe only 10. I will survive if I'm wrong.
Anyway, I milled 12 grooves; because of the flange, I could not do the grooves till the end. Therefore, the "fins" were only partly inserted in the grooves and silver soldered 2 pieces at the same time. After lowering the ribs, I silver soldered the pulley.
Now, I can do the adjustable shaft.

Fan hub and pulley.JPG

193 fan hub.JPG

194 Hub.JPG

195 hub and pulley.JPG

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Oh, your work is astounding and I have followed this thread for years! I have learned from you and have applied some of the things I’ve learned and applied it in this build, you are truly a master.
The model I’m building is a longtime dream and I don’t yet have the capabilities you possess so I’m leaning on what resources I do have, most all of the components were designed in Solidworks (including the patterns for photoetch) and it’s allowed me to do something I wouldn’t be able to otherwise. It’s been a heck of a learning curve, I even learned how to screen print decals, and when it’s done I’m going to try a classic car without the high-tech stuff.

 

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Edited by Murco (see edit history)
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Nice wheels Murco! You are using a different technique to get your goal; as you know, I have a different philosophy. Which is "right"? There are many answers possible, the most important is that you and me are pleased with what we are doing. Why don't you open you own thread with your construction?

 

Before I did the controversial hub, I built the support for it. This support will be screwed on the crankcase and is designed to let rise or lower the pulley and fan assembly to have the correct tension of the belt. 
At that time, the belt did not drive the generator nor the water pump; those two assemblies were driven by the camshaft's chain.
Logically the next step would be either the crankcase or the fan. I choose the fan and began with the star support for the blades. Here too, the blades are spaced symmetrically which is easier for me. This small part (a tad over 1") required a lot of filing and careful drilling for the blade's rivets. The surfaces on which the blades will be riveted have a slight curve. This is the kind of parts I like to do!
I'm not sure, but I believe that the blades were made with polished stainless steel on the original cars; mines will be brass. Once riveted, the assembly will be chromed and the blade's support will be painted black. 

196 hub and support.JPG

197 Fan.JPG

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This is so amazing. Every time this guy shares pics of his projects, my estimate of his IQ goes up several points. I think he's up to about 900 by now. Same with some of the other model builders on this thread.

 

Thank you for letting us see your craftsmanship at work, folks.

Edited by JamesR (see edit history)
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Thanks James! However, I doubt that my IQ is above the average, unless fingers have their own IQ!

 

The 6 blades were made with a thinner brass; they were pre-drilled, shaped and polished. The assembly to the support was done with 30 rivets, without almost no damage to the polished surface. The rivets are done with a thin copper wire, 0.5 mm in diameter (0.02") and ....riveted with modified tools I used for the frame's rivets.
Now that the very front end of the engine is done, I definitively have to go rearwards. I will begin the crankcase soon; this is originally a cast aluminum part; it will be done with flat brass, suitably shaped and silver soldered. 

198 Fan ready.JPG

199 Fan ready.JPG

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The details are making the "salt" from a model!

 

Doing an engine with flat stock is always an adventure. Even if the crankcase sides are rather flat, there are logically still curves. For the moment, the curves are far away, I have to make the foundations. The first parts are less than glamourous as you can see below. Those 3 parts are the base for the crankcase and both sides. But why there are dents on the parts representing the sides?

200 A future engine.JPG

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12 hours ago, drhach said:

I'll bite. Are they tabs that you'll fold over for soldering? 

Congratulation, the first part from your answer is correct! However, the main goal is not for soldering (but it can help). As you don't know how the crankcase is looking, the right answer was difficult to guess. The crankcase is made with aluminum; to attach the oil pan, studs are inserted into that casting. As the flange is too thin, there are bosses for the studs. 

At first, I intended to solder each boss individually either before or after soldering the sides. Anyway, those small things would have been difficult to solder at the right distance from each other. Finally, I came with that solution. The end result will take some time to show because I have other things to do before.

A picture from the real crankcase from a V-12; the V-16 is similar, just longer:

 

Build 4.jpg

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5 hours ago, Paulie9fingers said:

Great question drhatch, Roger I assume you will bend the tabs outward and then solder a single piece beneath it and the tabs become the thicker areas for the oil pan bolts.

Exactly! It will look like that:

201 side to base.JPG

Edited by Roger Zimmermann
added picture (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...

After a short vacation (we had to go back home earlier because of the virus), the "work" on the engine could resume. The side from the crankcase are now silver soldered to the base. It makes an incredible long engine, but rather narrow. 
I don't know yet how I will do the rear of the crankcase as I have too few pictures from that place but, no worry, I will find a way.

203 crankcase.JPG

204 crankcase.JPG

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Thanks John! I hope you will apreciate the next pictures.

 

To continue the crankcase, I began to delimitate the place for the engine blocks. The RH one has an offset equal to the width of a connecting rod's journal, 2.4mm on the model (0.095"). Then, I did the narrow wall ending the crankcase at the engine blocks. I still have to do the same at the rear.
Then I soldered the rear part of the distribution case but larger than the final shape. Then came the big question: how to proceed further? The most reasonable solution was the shape the flange on which the end cover will be attached. One small flange was soldered at the LH crankcase and holes drilled to attach the end cover.
Once the flange was shaped correctly, I did the band closing the distribution case. That band was soldered to the mounting flange, letting a small raised edge like you can see on the original picture.
The question of the day was: can I solder the outer distribution case to the crankcase and have a correct position for the end cover? With careful adjustment and some trick, my gamble went quite well: the end cover is installed at the right position. My description of the various steps can be confusing; this was indeed a complex undertaken.
There are still missing details on that distribution case; I will probably add them with soft solder.

205 Crankcase.JPG

206 Crankcase.JPG

207 Crankcase.JPG

208 Crankcase.JPG

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On top of the distribution case, there is an integrated casting for the distributor and to attach the cooling fan. I decided to make that piece from a brass block with milling/filing. Once the part was ready, I began to mill/file an aperture at the distribution case which was not an so easy task. 
When the fitting of the past pleased me, it was silver soldered to the assembly.
On one picture, there is a hole at the back of the distribution case; this is the pilot hole for the generator. I did also the hollow at the crankcase for the generator clearance.
Just for the fun, I did the last picture with the fan installed; when the engine blocks, cylinder heads and valve covers will be installed, the top of those elements will be a tad under the top of the fan. Imagine that in a modern styling, the hood could not be installed!

209 Rework.JPG

210 distributor mount.JPG

211 Tall engine.JPG

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