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Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12


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By looking at the differential's pictures I have, something was obvious: the ends of the diff at the wheels are separate parts assembled by welding to the main body. It's not important to know, but I still wonder if the machining was dome before or after welding. For my needs, I choose the solution "before" because the solution "after" is not suitable with my tools.
Therefore, I machined 2 short tubes with the flange for the brake shield; this move will allow me to complete the rear brakes. The correct orientation of the brake shields on the main body will be easy then.
The attached picture is sowing at the top the inside of a drum; a steel bushing was inserted into the hub. On the real cars, this is a ball bearing.
On the left side, there is a view from the inside of a brake shield with a short tube emerging. On the real car, the wheel bearing is installed on that tube; most of the car weight is not carried by the axle shaft but by the differential tube. This arrangement was called 3/4 floating. Heavy trucks have the full floating type where the axle shafts have just the function of transmitting the power. On more recent cars with RWD, the axle shafts are supporting all the weight and transmitting the power.
On the right side, the brake shield is seen from outside; the emerging tube will be inserted into the diff and soft soldered.

96 Rear drums and shields.JPG

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I promise to read your posts more carefully, and find the questions you ask, in future. I have now been severely reprimanded! :wacko:

 

I did translate the lathe parts into French using Google translate. I have just tried to find the file on my computer, it's somewhere in there, but at present I cannot find it! When I do I will post it. 

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I have managed to find the lathe file, English to French translation. This is just meant to be a bit of fun to see what you think of the translation. Roger, if you want me to remove the post after you have looked at it, please let me know and I will do so.

 

253297627_Partsofalathe.jpg.abab25921a0b4f3c0166e5533a0e2b43.jpg

 

Today we will learn about the parts of a lathe, its operation and working. The lathe is used in many metal forming industries. It is combination of many parts which work together to perform a desired function. A lathe is used to perform turning, chamfering, boring, facing, internal and external threading.

 

Aujourd'hui, nous allons en apprendre davantage sur les pièces d'un tour, son fonctionnement et son fonctionnement. Le tour est utilisé dans de nombreuses industries de formage des métaux. C'est une combinaison de nombreuses pièces qui fonctionnent ensemble pour effectuer une fonction souhaitée. Un tour est utilisé pour effectuer le tournage, le chanfreinage, l'alésage, le dressage, le filetage interne et externe.

 

There are many types of lathe, but each machine consists of some basic parts which are essential for its proper working. These parts are bed, tool post, chuck, head stock, tail stock, gear train, lead screw, carriage, cross slide, split nut, apron, chip pan, guide ways etc. These parts work together to obtain desire motion of tool and work piece so it can be machined.

 

Il existe de nombreux types de tours, mais chaque machine se compose de quelques pièces de base indispensables à son bon fonctionnement. Ces pièces sont le lit, le porte-outil, le mandrin, la tête, la queue, le train d'engrenages, la vis mère, le chariot, la glissière transversale, l'écrou fendu, le tablier, le porte-copeaux, les voies de guidage, etc. Ces pièces fonctionnent ensemble pour obtenir le mouvement souhaité de l'outil et pièce de travail afin qu'il puisse être usiné.

 

The lathe machine works on the basic principle that when the work piece is rotated at a constant speed and a tool is introduced into its rotation, it cuts the metal.

 

La machine de tour fonctionne sur le principe de base selon lequel lorsque la pièce à travailler tourne à une vitesse constante et qu'un outil est introduit dans sa rotation, elle coupe le metal.

 

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Thanks for the exercise! If the text is acceptable (but would need improvements here or there), the names of the basic parts is sometimes pure fantasy!

Just for the fun, here are the terms in French:

Bed = banc (bench in English)

Head stock = porte-outil (Google is correct!)

Chick = mandrin (Google is right again)

Head stock = poupée (doll in English!)

Tail stock = contre-poupée

Gear train = could be correct

lead screw = vis mère (correct)

Carriage = trainard (straggler in English!)

Cross slide = chariot transversal

Split nut = ?

Chip pan = bac à copeaux

As I'm not sure about apron and guide ways, I prefer to say nothing!

 

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The rear brakes are actuated differently than the front ones. No cable, but a rotating shaft each side of the differential. At the left from the attached picture, you can see the actuating lever which is the same as for the front and a shaft "pinned" into the brake shield. That shaft has a lever; the connecting between that lever and the actuating one is still to be done. On the right, you can see the other drum and shield assembly with that shaft. The other end of the shaft will get a lever, of course, and it will be guided by a bracket and bearing attached to the differential body.

97 rear brakes.JPG

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To continue with the brakes, I had first to do the links transmitting the movement from the brake shaft and the actuator lever. The link is curved to clear the differential. I don't know how much space is between link and differential on the real cars; on the model, I will have to be careful by not spraying too much paint!

98 rear linkage.JPG

99 rear linkage.JPG

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Thanks John! Another post which is more or less déjà vu:

 

The rear brakes are now ready; they are similar to the front ones. The support plate has another shape due to the differences between front and rear axle. I can continue with the differential; there are 4 flanches to do: 2 which will be part of the diff body, one for the cover and the last one for the differential carrier or pumpkin.


By the way, did you know that Cadillac cars from 1932 had adjustable shock absorbers? The shop manual is not very detailed nor has a good system's description. If I'm right, there were 5 possibilities which could be set from the driver's seat. All four shock absorbers were connected with rods, adding the complexity to that frame. As you see, it was not an invention from recent years.
 

100 Rear brake ready.JPG

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Roger, Your work is absolutely incredible. Between watching your build and adding historical data, like the adjustable shocks, is very fascinating. I may not post comments often but I want you to know I follow this post every day. Thanks for sharing your work and knowledge.

TomP 

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11 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

By the way, did you know that Cadillac cars from 1932 had adjustable shock absorbers? The shop manual is not very detailed nor has a good system's description. If I'm right, there were 5 possibilities which could be set from the driver's seat. All four shock absorbers were connected with rods, adding the complexity to that frame. As you see, it was not an invention from recent years.

The shocks are adjustable with five positions via a control lever to the left of the steering column connected to a ride regulation gauge on the dash indicating  free to firm.

1785202773_DSCN4606(Medium).thumb.JPG.975c9fed6dcabc8b5ce6d1e992170094.JPG1139937879_DSCN4607(Medium).thumb.JPG.f90c50541e910850898c64a981e598f1.JPG

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Thanks Tom and Alex for the dash's picture/explanation. I was not aware that the dash had that indicator! The model will have functioning shock absorbers, the regulation will be there too, but will not adjust the shock absorbers!

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Even if I'm shaping metal since years, sometimes I'm too optimistic. As the weather was mild recently, I went to my store room/garage to shape a piece of wood on which I would "stamp" the rear axle halves like the original part (first picture). I cut a piece of brass 0.5mm thick, annealed it and began to bang and bend it. Well, the metal did not respond like I wanted; the end result was just good for the trash as you will see on the second picture.
I had to think how to continue it; from 2 possible options, I choose the one which I will have to silver solder the flancs in the middle. The last picture is where I'm now. Of course, with a right die set, the pressing would have been possible. However, for that kind of metal forming, the wood is way too soft.

 

 

101 Rear axle die.JPG

102 bad attempt.JPG

103 getting better.JPG

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Thanks John! The model will be about 430mm (16.9") long. I choose the short wheelbase of 143".

 

The differential halves are now silver soldered and trimmed. Then, I checked for the offset of the differential and I noticed that I did an almost fatal error: I placed the differential in the middle! I will just have to make the RH side a bit longer and all will be good.
The picture from the diff body is showing an aperture; this will be needed to install a collar to the drive shafts to have a positive location. The holes around the hole are to attach the cover. You will probably see that the holes are not at the same distance from each other; this pattern is identical on the other side to attach the diff nose to the body. There must be a reason for that, I don't know it.
I began to prepare the diff nose by silver soldering the tube (which was done long ago) to the main plate which will be assembled to the body. I still have to add the decorum to this assembly. The holes you can see are indeed recesses in that main plate, probably to save weight.

105 Diff body.JPG

106 diff nose.JPG

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Here is another picture from the diff nose. From the many pictures from an original diff, the onw from under was of course missing. Therefore I had to guess and, even if the shape is similar, it may not be accurate.
I will add 2 or 3 small items with silver solder, then I will switch to soft solder: some threads at the diff output are clogged by soldering material. they can be reworked, but it's a waste.

107 diff nose.JPG

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The work is going forwards with the nose. Some details were added by silver soldering them; now, I will attach the remaining details with soft solder because due to the irregular shape of the nose, they cannot stay where I would like. With soft soldering, I have to possibility to hold them with a tool.
Most pictures I did on the original differential were at the left side; this is the same with the pictures I got from Holland. Therefore, I had to guess more than I expected how the RH side is looking like.
For the pictures, I assembled the nose to the diff body to have a more realistic impression.

108 diff progress.JPG

109 diff progress.JPG

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Very cool, sometimes I search the internet to see what you are building because I'm not familiar with what everything should look like. I was hoping that maybe these photos would help but it doesn't look like you can see anything. This chassis also has a different hub assembly, I'm not familiar with the different models and years.

July_11,_2016_190.JPG.5765a8b6a399b7fd7fa38327576aed5a.jpg

July_11,_2016_197.JPG.6a4cd4ac851180d03efa40e19e7a4726.jpg

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Thanks for the pictures! Even if I'm far from a specialist from the thirties, I'm sure this frame is a 1932/33 one. La Salle, Cad V-8, V-12 or V-16, I cannot tell. The hubs are strange, maybe for wood wheels or hubs from 1930-31.

 

I'm adding a picture or two from a real '32- '33 V-16frame.

IMG_20190808_142437.jpg

IMG_20190808_142500.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Yes, there are 2 "fins" on the right side (I'm right now doing them) and a third one on the left side which is soft soldered now. There will be also a vent tube which is not yet born.

Thanks for looking intensely at the model!

The picture is from a V-8 car; the diff is very similar but not the same as the V-16. You see the vent tube I will add.

By looking at the front brakes from "your frame, I saw also discrepancies : the brake shield is not the same, the external levers are arranged differently. I have pictures from a 1932 V-8 brake shield; it's similar to the V-16, just 1" smaller. I'm adding a picture from my own brake shield to show the difference.

Diff V-8a.jpg

84 front brake shields.JPG

Edited by Roger Zimmermann
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I just searched 'Cadillac V16 for sale', they are way out of my price range! :o An interesting engine configuration. I think making a model of one maybe a little cheaper :)

 

Keep up the excellent work and posts.

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From mine too! Further more, in my opinion, they are not easy to drive in the actual traffic. The engine was a successful attempt to have some styling appeal; it was also, if I'm right, the first engine with hydraulic valve lifters.

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The differential nose is ready. I also corrected the length of the housing by adding a spacer on the RH side. Now, the torque tube will be in the middle. As a consequence from my error: the RH shaft for the brake actuation must be extended because the bearings for the shafts are positioned at the same distance from the nose. The pads for those bearings are the next addition to the housing, as well the brackets for the shock absorbers and the brackets for the strut rods which are combined with the pads for the leaf springs.

110 diff progres.JPG

111 diff progress.JPG

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Thanks!

 

The differential body is almost ready. What I still have to do: create a double bearing in the middle of the body to guide the axle shafts as there is no diff pinion for that purpose.
As you can see on both pictures, I have to elongate the RH brake shaft; the one for the LH side is OK. Then, I will have to do both bearings for the brake shaft; they are attached with screws on the pads I added recently.
Other additions which were made: the brackets for the shock absorbers, the brackets for the strut rods and the resting pads for the leaf springs.

 

112 diff details.JPG

113 diff details.JPG

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Thanks Paul!

To extend the brake shaft, I will put it in the lathe, drill a hole; make an extension with a small shaft going into the hole and soft solder the assembly. That will be strong enough. As the actuating lever at the other end is soft soldered, I cannot silver solder the joint. Why? Because, when soft solder is heated above a certain temperature, there is a combinaison with the brass creating pits!

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It took an awful long time to fabricate those 2 tiny bearing guiding the brake shafts. They are small and, even if I had not fat fingers, I had some difficulties to grab them for "machining". Then, to adjust them to have a free rotation of the shafts was a matter of trial and error. And, finally, by soldering the bearing (a simple tube with the proper dimensions) to the support, I had the bad surprise that everything was soldered: bearing, support and shaft!
On the second bearing, I thought that I had the perfect solution: I used a cleaned drill bit to simulate the shaft; the solder found its way to it and the drill bit was soldered to the bearing! I had to just heat it to let turn the drill bit with a plier and, during cooling, the solder joint was broken. Most probably the ideal position of the bearing was disturbed during the drill bit rescue because I had a binding situation which was solved by enlarging the inside diameter of the bearing.

114 brake shaft bearing.JPG

115 bake shafts.JPG

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