Roger Zimmermann

Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

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Thanks for your comments, Randy. The picture without the flash was indeed an "accident" but as you wrote, the result was not bad. Probably with more playing with the sensibility, diaphragm and more parameters, pictures can be better than with the pocket camera. However, if I need 10 minutes to make a good picture with the reflex camera compared to a few seconds with the old one, is there any "progress"?

 

The dots are easy to do: just place a piece of brass on the large piece shown in the picture, secure it on one side and go! After one dot done with very moderate pressure, move the assembly for 0.2mm (0.008") for the next one and so on. When the line is completed, move on the other axis for 0.2mm and do another line. No high tech, just boring!

There will be no report for some time: I'm now preparing all the remaining parts to be chromed and there is a lot.

 

Dot factory.JPG

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

Roger,

 

When you move .002 to the next dot, how do you measure that .  Is your wheel graduated in thousands?  How many dots are in a row?  That must be a time consuming chore.  Any way, We will be awaiting the final results.

 

Randy

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Hi Randy

One revolution of the wheel is giving a movement of 1 mm. The wheel has 0.05 mm graduations; as one step is 0.2mm, 5 dots are done with one turn of the wheel. To simplify the task, I painted 5 white dots on the wheel.

One line is 85mm in length; divided by 0.2 this gives 425 dots. Yes, it was a time consuming task; one line took maybe 15 minutes to be completed but it was not possible to do that task without interruption. I'm glad it's over!

The chore with the paint is not yet over. This week, I ordered in France other spay cans; 2 blue ones and a gold olive one. The Opel paint I first bought for the engine was too dark; the Mark II forum gave the indication that the original engine paint  is very near from a Champagne mist metallic from Nissan. I can get this paint from the French Company as well as the blue one with a fine metallic content which is a deviation of the original Ford/VW/Renault paint. (I was surprised to notice that many makes are using the same paint; sometimes duringthe same tme span, sometimes just outside of their competition) The other blue paint I ordered is from Opel; I asked also for a fine metallic content. I should get the paint during next week. As I'm in France now, there will be no shiping problem!

At the end, I will have a full store of almost full spay cans, with the exceptions of the ones I will use for the model. This may be the most expensive post for that model!

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VOILA ! !      I found that new colors seldom  are generated.  A lot of manufacturers "re cycle" older colors with just a minor change.  Let us hope that the colors that you get there will answer your needs.  Are these urethane paints or just enamels?    June in France must be very nice.  What part of France are you staying in?   

 

Enjoy your vacation.

 

Randy

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Yes, Randy, I was myself surprised to see that many manufacturers are using the same paint! Indeed, the paint manufacturers are selling their products to various vehicles producers.

I got two days ago an Opel and a VW paint with fine aluminum particles. The same color I did the trunk lid some time ago will be the definitive paint with that particles change. The paint is most probably an enamel type. The clear coat is acrylic.

 

We are located near the town of Nîmes. Since 5 days the weather is indeed hotter than usual: 35 to 37°C is now the rule; the result is that we are doing almost nothing, except drinking (water the afternoon) and eating!

Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)

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Roger,

 

When are you getting back from France?   

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IT has been very hot here also.  IT hit 115 degrees Fahrenheit in Phoenix, the next state over and hit 110 degrees in Anza Borrego (our desert not 70 miles from the coast).  A friend has an apple orchard up in Julian, Ca., which is only 40 miles from here and it has been hoovering around 93 to 95 degrees for the last week.  He is working in his orchard and starts at 5:30 AM and quits when he cannot stand it any longer (around 11:30 AM).  He is drinking around a gallon of liquids every two hours.  Me I am staying by the beach.   Believe it or not, it has been staying very comfortable (in the high 70's, low 80's) all week.  If we get a Santa Ana (a westward wind blowing off of the desert) that will change VERY QUICKLY.  Right now, we have been given a reprieve and are keeping our fingers crossed.  Stay cool and we will hear from you in the near future.  Right now, I think I will go make another pitcher of Ice tea.......................or something stronger.   :-)   

Randy    

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8 hours ago, Randiego said:

Roger,

 

When are you getting back from France?   

Soon, Randy, soon!

It seems that this June month is hot everywere...

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After the paper work resulting from 3 ½ weeks’ vacation, I decided to assemble the parts to be chromed on a new tree. It’s very time consuming; the parts must be secured to have a good electrical contact and not to be lost. Usually, each part is attached with 2 wires; obviously, the small ones have just one copper wire as contact to the tree.

While assembling all those loose parts, I did a new check: are now all parts done? Of course not: the dip stick for the transmission and engine oil are still missing; they were quickly done. However, as they are unpractical to attach to the tree, they will go in a small cage with the hood emblem, rings for the instrument cluster and the “Continental” letters.

At the inner belt, there are also small moldings attached to the trim; I had to do them. I now hope that all the chrome parts are done. Unfortunately, the plating company will be closed for 3 weeks; the tree will stay home until early August.

What is the next step? I just would like to have an assembly ready: I will put the engine in pieces, paint them and reassemble. Some elements like the spark plus wires are not yet done; they will be realized as a final touch.

The first picture is showing the parts which will be nickeled; on the 2 other pictures, you can see the small cage into which those parts are enclosed.

881 To be nickeled.JPG

882 another batch.JPG

883 from the back side.JPG

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Happy to see you back and making more progress. Interesting as always...

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Bonjour Roger,

 

Glad you made it home o k.   Hotter n' HELL here.  What makes it bad is the humidity.  We get more than illegal immigrants here in San Diego.  A tropical storm is in the Gulf of Tehuantepec  off the coast of Acapulco Mexico.  It is pushing North and all the humidity has settled in on us making it so very miserable.  Don't want to work, don't want to move around as it is extremely uncomfortable.  We are used to dry desert air and this is the pits.  

 

Enough about me.  I hope that your stay in France was good and that you got to spend time visiting and enjoying the food and wine.  

 

How does the small parts in the basket get coated evenly.  Do they agitate it to ensure that all sides of the parts get exposed to the electrolyte bath or ?  Amazing that this process works for you as those are extremely small parts, especially the letters.

 

Randy

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Years ago, I experienced the heat and humidity while in vacation in Florida. I appreciated the A/C those days!

In June it was hot in France too. We did almost...nothing.

I doubt that the basket will be agitated. I did a similar basket while I did the Avanti model, it contained also letters from the Toronado model. The basket was not very well constructed, some letters were trapped into it. To my surprise, all letters and the other parts into the basket were well covered. I hope it will be the same this time; I built the basket in a way that the parts inside cannot be trapped. Obviously, nickel and chrome don't have the same behavior!

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This is almost a chaos: painting the engine. Everything must be disassembled, sanded, cleaned, and painted. Each major assembly is put in a bag with the fasteners and will be apart when something finished is assembled again.

Most parts in the background are ready, some are waiting to be treated; most have been immerged in a solution to cover them with a thin coat of tin. I don’t remember who gave me that idea, it is a great one!

884 Engine paint.JPG

885 Engine paint.JPG

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The engine is now almost ready. Missing are the spark plus wires and some decals. Of course, the parts which are chromed are not yet installed; the plating company is close for vacation. Now, it’s time to have a look at the body or at the seats…

886 Engine paint.JPG

887 Engine paint.JPG

888 Engine paint.JPG

889 Engine paint.JPG

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Absolutely incredible! That engine is a showpiece on it's own.

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Incredible craftsmanship!  It looks like after you install the plug wires it will fire up and run.

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Almost a shame to cover up all that superb metalwork with paint. Looks incredible.

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Thanks Alex and Fadt! The engine is like the film industry: only show...Fortunately, the hood can be opened to see the engine.

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Beautiful work Roger.  Fantastic.  The engine shows so much detail.  Do you make the decals too?  I know that there is a program (in photo shop?) that is for the modelers to make them but I never have.  What are you using for the ignition wires?  Will they have "boots" or metal clips?  

 

Randy

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Thanks Randy! Indeed, I have repro decals, scale 1:1. I had once an address locally from a guy doing decals and who could do decals from the real ones (I don't have this possibility and I don't want to begin with it), after an hard disk crash, I lost many addresses. Maybe I will find him again.

The wires will be done with...electrical wires. The boots will be made with brass.

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