Roger Zimmermann

Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

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Indeed, I used the whole afternoon for 2 tiny parts acting as "bearings" for the wiper blades and finalized the assembly of the blades to the arms. Concentration is the key for those small cooper "axles" of 0.3 mm and riveted to the blades.

As you can see, the hood was removed as taking a lot of space.

The springs and rubber blade are still missing; they will be added when the assemblies are chromed.

 

832 wipers.JPG

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

From another forum, I had a request to put one wiper on my hand; I'm sharing this picture here. That assembly can almost be bent just by looking too severely at it...Each wiper is an assembly from 13 separate parts either soft or silver soldered; the number will be 15 with the spring and rubber blade. The way both wipers are done, the rubber blade should follow the contour of the windshield in the rest position.

 

 

833 wiper.JPG

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zipdang, I doubt that the wipers will work better than yours: they will stay in the rest position!

 

After this difficult wiper story, I had to do something simple: the dryer/receiver for the A/C. On the Mark II, it is located at a strange position: under the floor, attached to the frame.

Once installed on the frame, I put the body on to check for interference: I had to do a massage to the floor to have enough clearance...

834 Dryer.JPG

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Some time ago, a member from the Mark II forum discovered an error at the heater core: when I was doing them, I picked the wrong picture on the net and I did 2 identical parts. The result was that the inlet/outlet tubes were on the top at the LH heater and at the bottom at the RH heater core. In fact, the RH part is a mirror image of the other one. The correction was quickly done: I just heated the spot with the solder iron and turned both "tubes" by 180°. Unfortunately, the holes in the boy are not equally spaced, therefore I had to enlarge the holes from the heater core. When the model will be assembled, nobody will see it, but I was not pleased. How can I correct that without doing the part again? Well, a thin "cover" over the flange would do the trick.

I have to confess that when I drilled the holes in the body, both sides were done exactly the same because I used a template. When I drilled the flanges from the heater cores, I remembered that I had a template, but did not found it in my mess. The holes were drilled as well as I could, but I had to correct almost every holes. As I found later that template, it was the opportunity to correct both sided. I'm feeling much better now!

 

The next task was to add the small handle at the inner base of the LH rear lamp bezel. This handle is needed to swing the rear lamp to open fuel tank. As I was at that lamp, it was time to add the spring to keep it closed. I had to make 2 attachment points for the spring, did a spring with a 0.1 mm wire (0.004") and installed it. The most difficult part was to makes both "eyes" at each and of the spring and to insert them into the attachment points, but it works fine!

 

835 modified heater cores.JPG

836 detail added to the lamp.JPG

837 Return spring added.JPG

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I suppose you are going to put a factory-looking gas cap on that pipe, too? You are an AMAZING and SKILLED guy!

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9 hours ago, keiser31 said:

I suppose you are going to put a factory-looking gas cap on that pipe, too?

Thanks John S. and keiser31. Yes, there will be a gas cap on that pipe. I'm not that far because the fuel pipe will be the plug for the voltage needed to operate light and window motors. There will be no in-car battery.

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Who said that a Mark II is an easy car? As I'm preparing another batch of parts to be chromed, I wanted to include the vent window frames. Wait a minute: they are not ready! A small detail is missing: an art gutter on top of it. I'm surprised that nobody from the Mark II community asks about that missing detail...

By looking how to do that, I saw that it has to be very precise: it must not rub at the drip rail above it while opening the door and the vent window must not touch it either. At first I wanted to skip it but it's a part rather unique so I did try. Now, which thickness? 0.1 or 0.2mm?

As the clearance has to be tight, I opted for 0.1mm (0.004"). I could even silver solder the flange, allowing a little bit more heat when soft soldering the assembly to the main frame.

The following pictures are showing that gutter. Fortunately, the chrome on those parts is very thin!

 

839 vent frame detail.JPG

838 Vent window frame.JPG

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After doing the same for the other vent window frame, I assembled those 2 parts to the chrome tree. This morning, I went to the plating company with the tree and the grille which will be nickel plated. The boss promised me that the parts will be ready in one week.

 

840 third batch chrome.JPG

841 third batch back side.JPG

842 grille to be nickeled.JPG

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Just for keiser31: I did a fuel cap. Why?

Since the third batch of parts to be chromed is at the outside company, I don't know with what I could continue. I still have the ceiling to do before the roof is soldered to the body, but it's too cold outside to deal with polyester. Inside, I have war with my better half! Therefore, I'm hunting for the small details which have to be done anyway!

While I was at the details, I colored the tail lenses with transparent paint. When I was doing those lenses, I had a problem with what looking like a crack where the plastic was sharply bent. With the paint, that crack is no more apparent...It was maybe an optical illusion, who knows...

 On the real car the back-up lenses are not clear on the entire surface. The rear portion has a different inner surface, hiding the construction of the rear lamp. I tried to reproduce it with white paint; maybe media blast would be more effective but I don't want to go with that experience.

843 fuel cap.JPG

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Cadillac had this feature since the forties till 1958. On those cars, the lamp had a hinge on top. With that sideway movement, the Mark II is more special.

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WOW....again. That fuel cap is so detailed and that taillight assembly is SO real looking!!

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I do my best to be near the reality. Don't forget also that, depending on the screen size from your computer, the elements in reality are much smaller (hiding the imperfections).

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7 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

I do my best to be near the reality.

 

Next, you'll tell us that you put gas in it & had the motor running. ;)  LOL

 

Still AMAZED ...EVERY ... time I visit this thread.

 

 

Cort, www.oldcarsstronghearts.com
pig&cowValves.paceMaker * 1979 CC to 2003 MGM + 81mc

"Wake me up inside" | Evanescence | 'Bring Me To Life'

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The last batch of plated parts left me with some disappointment; I had a mixed feeling when I brought the new batch to be plated. This morning, I went to the plating company as the parts were ready. What a good surprise! The grille, now nickel plated is excellent as well as the other chromed parts. For once I'm enthusiastic how the parts are looking. Most probably, this time the copper/chrome was a tad thicker than previously; if I'm right that coat is about 0.01mm (0.0004"). Now, I will put aside the accessories I'm doing for the engine and begin to assemble the bumpers and other parts. That's the very nice part of that hobby!

 

845 third batch chromed.JPG

844 finished grille.JPG

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They look good now, but even better when there are on the car! As always, such great work, Roger.

Keith

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Thanks Keith! It will take a long time until they go back to the car. for the moment, due to the work to be done, the model is almost completely disassembled as you can see on that picture...(wich represents maybe 1/4 of all parts)

 

 

DSC06505.JPG

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I think its worth noting that on page one of this odyssey you write:

"February 3, 2010 was the beginning of this mad project: the construction of a Continental Mark II, scale 1:12, from scratch."

So yesterday was the 7 year anniversary, not only for you the builder, but for all of us as spectators...thank you for bringing us along on this fabulous ride!

Edited by Buick 59 (see edit history)
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Ah! Tom, the time is flying! I did not noticed that anniversary...My plan was 10 years, I hope I can get it in that timeframe. It seems that, according to the number of views, most people are not yet tired from this odyssey!

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I'd say that anniversary solidifies this as the top, ultimate, no-other-thread-comes close EPIC THREAD!

 

 

Cort, www.oldcarsstronghearts.com
pig&cowValves.paceMaker * 1979 CC to 2003 MGM + 81mc

"See what else your old heart can take" | Rosanne Cash | '7 Year Ache'

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