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Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12


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Thank you for your comments Dave! Usually, I don't know the location of the people who are responding, but I know whre you are: almost 20 years ago, while on training course for GM, I drove near London on the freeway!

It's possible to make small part on a large lathe; the countrary is more difficult! The size of the lathe was dictated by the available space and ease of transportation. All my work is done in the same room acting as office and workshop.

As a matter of facts, all people doing such reproductions have a certain age; young people now cannot wait for a long time until they see a result; they prefer different king of work/occupation.

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The attached picture is showing the little progress I did with the intake manifold. I'm working from back to front; somewhere in the front part there will be a thermostat housing. For the moment, the housing is still in the sky!

The four holes are just for fun or to help to identify the part...

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The intake manifold is finished; what a work load it needed! It's far from perfect; despite good pictures, sometimes I cannot catch the small difference...I will however survive: usually the hood is closed. When it's open, the air cleaner is hiding a great part of the intake manifold.

The underside of the manifold is...like the rear of a house in Hollywood! Only the top is more or less done like the real one, the underside will never be seen, the various canals are open.

This part is constitued with 20 or 30 tiny brass elements, brazed one after the other, taking care the the previous one will not shift during the heating process...

The carb spacer and the flange of the carb are assembled on the manifold. No, the carb is not yet ready!

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Edited by Roger Zimmermann
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  • 2 weeks later...

Last Sunnday was "repair day": I did a search in the Mark II forum for something not related and I found very nice pictures from the lifter valley's cover. I saw, but not immediately, 5 errors I did on mine! What a shame! I can accept one error, but not so many, so I reworked the part. I know that it will be barely seen, as the intake manifold mostly hide it. Anyway, the errors were corrected, some with bondo.

Then, by looking at the pictures I took on a real Mark II last November, I noticed that my oil pump, freshly done, had also 2 errors (there are more errors I cannot correct). Well, the oil pump came for modifications after the cover...

Now, I'm doing the oil pan; the first step is the flange as it can be seen on the attached picture, a real nice easy part. Of course, the part is more looking as a cover for the moment.

You can also see that the engine has a crankshaft. In fact, this is just a piece of brass on which the pulley will be installed.

The feet under the cylinder head are the pedestals on which the valve covers will be attached.

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Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)
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After the flange was done, the obvious element to do was a wood form as step two, and to hammer some brass on it. It was not as quick as I thought, but what is quickly done on a model. Then, when the shape was acceptable, the flange was brazed together with the new part.

According to the pictures I have from a real oil pan, the shape is more or less correct; it may not be absolutely correct dimension wise as there is a lot of guessing by looking at the pictures.

On the attached picture, you can see the wood form and the oil pan at step 3.

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Step 4: Another small wood form was used to shape the strange lower lip from the oil pan. This was done because the engine sit lower than regular Lincolns. With this shape, the same quantity of oil could be used as in the standard Lincoln engines.

After the shape was right, the part was brazed to the main element. As you can see, the upper part is looking like a flange and not like a flat lid.

A modified wood form was used at step 5, to shape the bottom part of the oil pan. The main job is done; I have now to do the holes for the external line going to the oil pump and the screw to evacuate the oil; still a couple of hours to play with that part.

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Well, you have made another awesome piece to add to the many others! Each piece is a work of art to me. You never stop surprising me with your forward motion and the intricate detail. I can hardly wait to see the next step each time you post. I REALLY love the photos of the morphing parts. From a thought to a rough piece to a miniature assembly! Simply amazing!

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O.K...Roger...when did you hollow out the undersides of the valve covers? I see brackets to hold them on, but I don't remember seeing how you did the routing...or did you?

It was one of the last work done to these parts and was not documented here because not so important. The main reason to remove some brass is to have some control on the weight: I don't intend to search for a new silicone rubber to do the tires again because the finished ones cannot support the completed model!

The other reason is for ease of assembly/construction: the studs to held the valve covers are .8 mm in diameter (.03"); drilling a long distance with such a small diameter is risky. As I had to add brakets, it was logical to hollow the valve covers.

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Another small part is done: the water outlet, sitting on top of the intake manifold. The small tube going to the water pump is the by-pass tube; I did it in copper because this material is easier to bend and rebend than brass. This tube has a rather shape: it must clear the crankcase oil filler tube as well as the braket for the A/C compressor. These elements are not yet ready, maybe I will have to correct again the form of the tube...

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Roger

While I am also dumbfounded at this insane project, I have one question at the moment:

Is there any reason not to build more than one at a time? I would think that once you have the engineering problems of each little part figured out (which probably takes more time that making the part itself), it would make sense to make a run of four or five, or more.

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Roger

While I am also dumbfounded at this insane project, I have one question at the moment:

Is there any reason not to build more than one at a time? I would think that once you have the engineering problems of each little part figured out (which probably takes more time that making the part itself), it would make sense to make a run of four or five, or more.

West, your question is making sense. You are right, the "how to do", "what dimension" etc, is sometimes taking more time than to do the part.

On the other side, repetitive work is annoying. I did five wheels, five tires, 6 wheelcovers...I will never have the courage to even twice that number of parts. Remember: one wheelcover required about 40 hours when the "production" was full running; 5 sets of 4 would require 800 hours! I should live till 120 to do 4 to 5 more models!

As other thought: as my own source of data is far from complete, I'm sucking infos from people at the Mark II forum. Would they be willing to help if they would know some models will be for sale?

And, last, what would be the price of such a model when completed? My two other models have an insurance value of about $ 50'000.00 each; how many people would pay that ridiculous amount for a toy?

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Guest tonkaman

OMG are you freaking serious roger? you are a god, that is the most amazing thing i have ever seen. i sure hope you are passing your talents on to someone else who has your kind of passion. your work is beautiful.

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Thank you to you both for your comments. Fortunately, I'm not a god! Others people are as crazy as I am; recently a 1:6 Duesenberg with running engine was to be seen on the net.

Writing a book? Nope! that's not my cup of tea (or glas of red wine); I let Gerald A. Wingrove do that. I bought one of his books in Reno a very long time ago; I got in this book all the fundaments I needed to do my models as they are now. The technique will not change; maybe the equipment...the passion must be there, that's something you cannot pass to somebody else.

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Guest Backyardmechanic

Hello Roger,

Like many here I too enjoy this fourm.May I ask what is the title of the book you speak of by Mr.Wingrove.

Vern

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Hello Roger,

Like many here I too enjoy this fourm.May I ask what is the title of the book you speak of by Mr.Wingrove.

Vern

Hi Vern!

The book's title is: "The complete car modeller" published from New Cavendish Books in London. It was published in 1978 and I bought is probably in 1979.

Mr. Wingrove published other books (how can he find the time to build models and write books?) You may search in The Internet Craftsmanship Museum to find what he is doing.

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Before I did the Avanti, I had a pretty good stock of round brass, in various diameters. Nothing is lasting forever, not my brass stock! I had to order a bunch last week; it will be available early this week.

Due to that shortage, I could not continue with the distributor. Jobless? No! In my garage, I have a nice upper front suspension lever, on loan from the man having 3 Mark II. I have enough (for the moment) flat brass, let's do it! I was taking dimensions from that lever when I had an urgent need to see a frame picture and I discovered that the lever is not the right one.

Back to the documents I have, like the page 19 from the 1957 "Service Information" for Lincolns and Continental. I already discovered that this sketch is exactly 10 times smaller than the real car. I did a print and oh miracle, the printer did a copy which is exactly 1.2 times smaller than the page I scanned!

Sure, there is certainly a small percentage of error, but it goes in less than 1 hundredth of an inch.

The upper suspension lever is the easiest one I did (Ok, it's the third one in my life) and the pair was quickly done.

The first picture is showing the formed vertical elements for 2 levers and the flanges. On the second image, you can see one arm more or less finished; the outer contours are to be refined, plus the begin of the second arm. The pair is finished in the third picture. I just need to bore the holes for the shaft and the ones for the upper ball joint.

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Glad I could be of help Roger, let me know if there is anything else I can provide ...

I really appreciate the help I'm getting from all kind of people. Even if there are 3 Mark II not far away from home, their storage and condition (almost no space, dirt/oil everywere) prevent to have good pictures and to measure many elements. However, these cars will be usefull for inside and outside trim.

Jim, I don't know what you have as other treasures; as your father was involved with the heater & A/C, do you have something about the A/C compressor? The shop manual I bought recently over A/C system is helpless.

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Guest Backyardmechanic
Hi Vern!

The book's title is: "The complete car modeller" published from New Cavendish Books in London. It was published in 1978 and I bought is probably in 1979.

Mr. Wingrove published other books (how can he find the time to build models and write books?) You may search in The Internet Craftsmanship Museum to find what he is doing.

Roger thank you for the info. i have visit this site and enjoy reading .I look into buying the book that got you started But Vol.1 is out of production and they have a few vol.2.My question would vol.2 be any use to a beginer?I have a machine shop and am a retired tool die maker,so have knowage on machining parts.

Vern

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Guest knuckle head

To find an out of print book.. try abe books,or amazon. Supply the ISBN number, or Author Title and publisher if possible.

Henry

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Roger thank you for the info. i have visit this site and enjoy reading .I look into buying the book that got you started But Vol.1 is out of production and they have a few vol.2.My question would vol.2 be any use to a beginer?I have a machine shop and am a retired tool die maker,so have knowage on machining parts.

Vern

Vern, I don't have the vol. 2, therefore I cannot answer your question.

You had an interesting profession; most of the problems a model builder has should be a piece of cake for you! You have also probably a better machine equipment as I have; somewhere is this thread you can see with what I'm working.

What kind of model/scale do you intend to realize?

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I have both volumes. In Gerald's own words, "I decided that because the earlier work [book] is still largely relevant to current model makers' needs, a completely new book would provide much more space and so allow me to elaborate further on my techniques in general, and the new ones in particular... This book should be looked upon as a complementing the earlier work rather than superseding it, because the answers given to the problems posed then are still valid, but with a further ten years of experience behind me, I now feel I can offer some interesting and equally valid alternatives."

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Guest Backyardmechanic
Vern, I don't have the vol. 2, therefore I cannot answer your question.

You had an interesting profession; most of the problems a model builder has should be a piece of cake for you! You have also probably a better machine equipment as I have; somewhere is this thread you can see with what I'm working.

What kind of model/scale do you intend to realize?

Roger,

I'm very much into the early Dodge Brothers cars.1914-1930 DA.We manufacture parts for these cars and market them under the Company name ROMAR.Would like to tackel the 1923 DB coupe,as this model is very interesting being a change over year. I have one in basket case as to say and will be going for the 1:6 scale.

Thank you again for the infomation.

Vern.

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Guest Backyardmechanic
I have both volumes. In Gerald's own words, "I decided that because the earlier work [book] is still largely relevant to current model makers' needs, a completely new book would provide much more space and so allow me to elaborate further on my techniques in general, and the new ones in particular... This book should be looked upon as a complementing the earlier work rather than superseding it, because the answers given to the problems posed then are still valid, but with a further ten years of experience behind me, I now feel I can offer some interesting and equally valid alternatives."

Thank you West.

I have just today log on two used book sites found many dealers with these books on hand.

Vern.

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Roger,

I'm very much into the early Dodge Brothers cars.1914-1930 DA.We manufacture parts for these cars and market them under the Company name ROMAR.Would like to tackel the 1923 DB coupe,as this model is very interesting being a change over year. I have one in basket case as to say and will be going for the 1:6 scale.

Vern.

We both have a different approach at choosing the car to be done as a model: I prefer the ones which were new when I was a kid/teenager, as you can see at what I did or doing right now. The cars I have reflect also my attraction of US cars from the fifties.

The Eldo Brougham attracted me as strongly as a Mark II; now I have the real car, I would never do it as a model! It seems that I'm looking for difficulties as the first car I did, the Avanti, was not quite to be seen in great number in Switzerland...

Don't ask why I choose 1:12 as a scale, I have no idea anymore. 1:10 would be more easier to calculate; it seems that this scale is not used. 1:6 is giving a real large model and details which can be neglected at 1:12 have to be rendered on a 1:6 model.

When you begin, do a thread here, I will have a look at it!

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Both upper suspension arms are now ready with shaft and bushings. Missing are the ball joints; they will be done later when the frame is done. Of course, the suspension and steering will be working; therefore ball joints are a necessity.

Yesterday, I bought for about $ 70.00 rund brass in various diameters; it should be enough to finish the model!

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The first book from Gerald Wingrove was the key to do the tires. It may be a stupid question because nobody knows all, but do you think that the second volume would be an asset to me?

To be perfectly honest, off the top of my head and based on what I've seen you do, I don't think so. Basically he takes readers through his building of a Bugatti Royale. There may be a "trick" or two that you could gain by reading it, but I'd be surprised. It's very interesting to read for anyone interested in the process, however.

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To be perfectly honest, off the top of my head and based on what I've seen you do, I don't think so. Basically he takes readers through his building of a Bugatti Royale. There may be a "trick" or two that you could gain by reading it, but I'd be surprised. It's very interesting to read for anyone interested in the process, however.

Even an old dog can learn new tricks! I will search for that book; it will be one more in my library!

Thank you West for your comments about the vol. 2.

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As my stock of round brass is replenish, I could continue with the distributor. Boy, is that small part complicated! It will certainly not be the nicest part of the model, but remember that it's hidden behind the huge air cleaner. The part is rough, not yet sanded (there is not much to be sanded anyway!) and will look better with some paint on it.

When the distributor was ready, I was thinking at an easy part: the crankshaft pulley/damper. During the planning, I saw that it was not so easy and decided to do it in 3 parts: the damper itself, the hub and the pulley. I could have done the pulley and damper in one piece; there is a small gap between both parts and could not machine it (the gap is about 0.01"). The damper is a press fit over the pulley's hub according to the trial and error method, this time just trial!

The main hub with the spokes will be soft soldered to the pulley. It's also a press fit, but not so tight (the error part).

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Edited by Roger Zimmermann
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