Roger Zimmermann

Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

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Well, nothing is written in stone (if that's the right expression). The idea of light into the interior with led lamps is someting to think about it.

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"Well, nothing is written in stone (if that's the right expression). The idea of light into the interior with led lamps is someting to think about it."

 

I know you don't have much to do so why not add one more thing? (I'm just kidding you!) 

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Roger,

Looking at the seat movement, I am impressed that it moves as much as it does.  That is quite the feature!  And it is a copy of the real seat !  I can just imagine your mind conjuring up features to add to the Continental.  It will be a real revelation when we see the seat "cushions" installed in the car.  I am sure that you will have the correct patterns in them for authenticity.  We anxiously await your next installment on the Continental.

 

Tomorrow, the 4th of July, the United States celebrates her 240th year of the "Great Experiment" in democracy and freedom.  We salute our founding fathers for daring to defy the tyranny of King George.  God Bless the USA and at the same time God Bless Switzerland for being one of the "Jewels" of our small planet. The Vatican is not foolish.  The Swiss Guard keeps the Pope safe.  The world keeps correct time due to the diligence of the Swiss companies who make the most amazing time pieces.  We all see how it trickles down to the Swiss craftsman in many endeavours, you being one of the shining examples of "Craftsmen Extraordinaire".  Again, Roger, we are amazed at your genius.

Randy

 

P.S.  My Fiat Spider is in the body shop getting a new "lease on life".  New floor pans, firewall section, and all the dings and dents attended to. I will get the shell back from the shop this month.  THEN...........I get to put it all back together.  Thank goodness that I have an original Fiat Factory parts book with all the drawings showing where every fastener, doo dad and thing-a-ma-jig goes.  (I was fortunate enough to have a friend who loaned me his book for me to duplicate.)  Was there a parts book from Ford for the Continental?  Or did you have to rely on photographs and measurements only? 

 

Randy      

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Thanks for the message Randy! There is a parts book and service manual for the Mark II (I have them) but the details are not that great. Most details are photographied and measured; fortunately, I have access to such a car at 10 miles from home.

 

I began with the new rear springs before the summer break. Once the paper work was expedited at my return, I could continue with the rear springs; they are now done with 8 leaves; some leaves were done with a .3 mm thick stainless steel, some were done with the same material but .4 mm thick. The rear of the car is too high for the moment; when all remaining parts will be added, the high will be more or less correct.

As you may see, the nuts at the “U” bolts are not correct; the “U” bolts themselves are too long. All this will be corrected prior the final assembly.

 

 

786 rear spring.JPG

785 rear springs.JPG

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Mr Z, I have just today noticed that we can "like" a post.  Well, I do, but that is not enough, as your work is so unbelievable and beautiful, so I thought I should reply once more about how much I enjoy and admire your work, pictures, and explanations !  Thank you sir, your posts make a bright morning find !

 

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Roger that is awesome, thank you so much. I sat in front of my laptop watching the video and realized I was sitting there with my mouth hanging open like a ten year old kid in a candy store.

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All hail to Roger Z!!!! We are not worthy....

Your skills have continued to wow all of us and we are left in amazement!!

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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Wow!  Great video.  The windows work better than a 1:1 car.  Nice to see the car in real time.  Next video you will have to do a "walk around" and describe the entire car.

 

 

 

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Roger; I have been subscribed to this thread for well over a year with total amazement. The video puts a lot more into perspective with your hand showing the moving seats and windows. Amazing craftsmanship. Thanks for sharing this journey.

 

Alex D.

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Roger,
I too have been following your thread for years.  The addition of the video makes your work all the more incredible.  Thank you for taking the time to show the world your amazing work and I look forward to more videos in the future!

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Thanks to all for the positive comments.

To John: The "walk around" will not happen soon: right now, I'm trying to create the window's switches. Once the first prototype is ready, all the body parts will be removed, the body separated from the frame. Why? I have to continue the inside panels. For that, I must have more freedom and not moving 2.5 kg of brass!

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On July 14, 2016 at 8:20 AM, Roger Zimmermann said:

Some here asked for a short film. I tried this afternoon; here is the result: https://youtu.be/bZve6r3RwuU 

Be indulgent, it's the first time I'm doing something like that!

 

 

Oh.

My.

Goodness.

 

Pics are 1 thing, this video ... takes it all to a whole new level of awesomeness.  So cool to see the moving parts like that.  Thank you, Roger!!!!!!!!!!!

 

 

2-DAY EVENT ;) S Elgin IL, with restaurant & hotel discounts:
http://www.oldcarsstronghearts.com/2016/07/12/tuesday-trip-69/

"You can't see what those shades of gray keep covered" __ Jamey Johnson __ 'In Color'

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I forgot to add, I was pleasantly surprised at the power vent windows too. The only thing more exciting is to see the switches you come up with. Now you will have to engineer a tiny little human to operate them!

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John, since a few days I'm scratching my head how to do those switches. I did the same job on the Toronado years ago; I have absolutely no clue how I did that. Removing them is too complex (I tried, all the wires are soft soldered) to see what I did 35 years ago and I have only a few sketches from that time. You may imagine that it's beyond my abilities to develop a tiny human!

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Roger,

 

Still following along and will be here in the background until you finish. I too went out and viewed your video and it was amazing to watch. I also want to pass along that this is the first video that I'd taken the time to watch in at least 3 to 4 years and well worth it. Scott...

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Thanks Keith and Scott! It's an honor for me that you watched my small video!

 

My memory is really no more what it was once: fortunately, I found sketches about the Toronado’s switches, but I was not sure if they were finally used to do them. So, I remove the arm rest from that model to get at the master switch. I could not take it out, as all the wires were soft soldered to it and protected by a daub of silicone. At least, I was able to determine that the drawing for the lever was indeed actual. But, how did I manufacture the contacts? As I could not pursue the work I did more than 30 years ago, I had to go back to the paper and pencil, hoping for THE idea. For days, nothing came. In between, I got a splendid idea how to simplify the switches by using two batteries instead of one and a common wire at the contact point from both batteries. This would have been a tremendous simplification but had other disadvantages.

Finally, I saw the end of the tunnel with a possible solution. I began the obvious part, the lever which is at the right of the coin at the third picture. Then, obviously, I had to use some isolating material; I still had some material made with resin and pressed paper (a souvenir from my apprenticeship many decades ago), I milled that tiny part (still third picture, above the lever) which is embedded to the lever.

During that preparation, I noticed that the side of the armrest is not vertical but is at an angle. Disaster! How can I adapt the brass body I already did? Well, I bent the legs at an angle which should clear the problem; the second picture is showing the result.

Then it was just a matter to do some contacts and hope for the best. At first, the mobile contacts which are pushed towards their mate were done with .2 mm brass. Finally, I choose .1 mm which allow less effort at the lever and is more flexible. On the third picture, you see those moving contacts near to the mate; the distance between both groups is about .2 mm; the mobile contacts are getting a tiny plate of gold to avoid oxidation.

 

The wire you see is for the ground; the other wires will be soldered during the final assembly, but all completed switches will be verified for functionality with a multi-meter.

 

Now, I can go to the second quarter window switch and maybe to the ones for the doors.

787 Switch.JPG

788 Switch.JPG

789 switch parts.JPG

Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)
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Roger being able to see your craftsmanship is great, but being able to read how you go through the process of what you're doing just sends the experience right over the top.

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Well, doing a model without moving parts shed about 50% of the needed work. Another thinking: when you see pictures from the finished part(s), you cannot see if I had difficulties to get them or if it's was easy. If I had better documented what I did 35 years ago, I would have spared a lot of grey hair!

Anyway, thanks for your fidelity!

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As most of the hardware for the second rear quarter window switch were already done, I could finish it this afternoon. I could improve some details; I had to chase a short but finally I fount it: the lever or button was making contact at the positive plot.

I intend to continue with the switches before I don't remember how I did the first ones!

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