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Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12


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Thanks for the comments! Most probably, some of you thought, when I related the tire's making, that I would never go till the end as most of the people on earth would like to have the project finished before its beginning!

@Martin: when you go to a theatre, you know that the show will have an end; are you really in a sad mood at the end (it depends of course if the performance was good or miserable!)?

 

@Nelson: you have to find a way to get 12 times smaller! Unfortunately, the contact switch is just a fake; it will be difficult to start the (fake too) engine!

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Roger, as far as the "show" (your project) it will have a great end.  The sad part is we won't see anymore progress updates that we all look forward to as this outstanding hand crafted model is being built piece by piece and near finishing.  I applaud your hard work and great efforts on creating such a work of art for all of us to see.  You are a true craftsman and very talented person.  Thank you for sharing and taking us on this journey. 

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When a music show is good, the public is asking for one or two titles more (I don't know how it's called in English). I will do the same with a small bonus: the story of the Avanti model! It won't take so long as the story is ready, I just have to translate it. It will come after the last Mark II picture will be published as I will continue with the same post (if it's allowed).

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1 hour ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

When a music show is good, the public is asking for one or two titles more (I don't know how it's called in English). I will do the same with a small bonus: the story of the Avanti model! It won't take so long as the story is ready, I just have to translate it. It will come after the last Mark II picture will be published as I will continue with the same post (if it's allowed).

 

WOW!  What a great surprise!!  Thanks Roger!

 

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Many viewers are thinking that this model is perfect. Unfortunately, it’s not: if I’m proud about some parts I did over the years, the windshield wipers are not among them. I attempted to put a spring to keep the blade on the windshield; the spring is too small (because the space is narrow), the wire I could use too thin and I had about ½ hours to connect both ends…The result is with or without spring the pressure on the window is about zero! Well, as it’s a nice weather car, we will not care too much.

A paint problem was apparent since some time: with the day light, it’s good (it cannot be perfect). With the flash from the camera or with a lamp, a strange phenomenon can be seen, it’s like dust but it’s not. The LH front fender is affected on almost the entire surface and there is a spot on the hood and a tiny one on the trunk lid. The small spots are where I did a surface repair (do you remember the tiny holes or pores before my eyes were repaired?) and the LH front fender was repainted. My nephew who saw that thinks that the metallic pigments did a migration into the clear coat. Maybe…Anyway, the paint will stay that way.

Both attached pictures are showing the problem: the first one with flash and the second without.

 

1057 Wipers, paint.JPG

1058 Wipers.JPG

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Roger, all really good creators have things that, in their eyes, don't measure up.  It could be possible that if I were there and you carefully showed me an A/B case, I might also see what you're talking about.  As it is, with the two pictures you've show, I can't see the issue.   I can imagine at the level you work it is hard to always be satisfied but do know that your audience is amazed at what you've done. 

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Roger

If it were possible for me to slip into the driver seat I do believe in the possibility of everything working at 1:12th scale. But that is where your craftsmanship has allow our minds go. The journey was worth every visit and we all got to enjoy something wonderful as it progressed. It is kind of sad but very exhilarating to see what a person  can do. Again you are the MASTER.

Thank you

Nelson

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Thanks Nelson!  I'm glad if I can add a little dreaming in the mind of people; the world is full enough from ugly things.

 

@Jeff: You maybe don't want to see the paint problems! To help you: have a look at the surfaced encircled in red: do you see the lighter spot on the hood and the almost white lines on the fender? They are the issue I'm trying to explain. Fortunately, this appear only with artificial light. I forgot to add that my nephew is working as a painter in a body shop. 

Paint problems.jpg

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Ah, you're right, now that you've circled it in red, I do see them.  I agree with your nephew, it looks like some metallic has sought freedom in the clear.  That's probably why it shows up when you have a narrow light source.  You could ban flash photography ;)

 

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Hi Roger

I will try and make time in the afternoons, as at my age and bad health,, working in the workshop until lunchtime is enough for me. It may take me a few weeks to get to the point where I started following your posts. 1:1 scale is as small as I could go. I do not have the patience or the skills to even attempt the amazing work that you achieve. Thanks for recording your work.

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Thanks Gary and Pat! I had to play with lamps to do the pictures (outside would be good, but it's too cold); some undesirable reflections are apparent on the windshield; I could not avoid them. Fortunately, despite artificial illumination, the paint problem I related a few days ago are not visible. It depends greatly how the light is illuminating the body.

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3 hours ago, Mike Macartney said:

Hi Roger

I will try and make time in the afternoons, as at my age and bad health,, working in the workshop until lunchtime is enough for me. It may take me a few weeks to get to the point where I started following your posts. 1:1 scale is as small as I could go. I do not have the patience or the skills to even attempt the amazing work that you achieve. Thanks for recording your work.

Ah! Mike, age and good health are rarely associated, unfortunately. I really admire that at your age you are still restoring cars. After restoring 3 cars, I decided that it was enough. Sure, my cars are/were a little larger and parts heavier than the one you are working on. So I came back at what I did in my youth, scale models!

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  • 2 weeks later...

To glue the letters on the trunk lid without a guide would certainly be very difficult; therefore, I had to do something. The picture is the result of my thinking; I “just” have to glue the letters now! Before I got to construct that guide, I had to brood about the spacing of the letters. On the left side, there is an “I” which is narrower than the other letters. The “N” in the middle of the word must be in the middle of the car, therefore, the distance between each letter on the left side will be larger than on the right side. Unfortunately, I don’t have any more a Mark II to check, but I see no other alternative. Maybe it will not be noticeable; we’ll see.

 

 

 

1066 jig.JPG

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Roger

All I can say is you are the best. Wonderful build and I am sad to see it so close to finished. 

Enjoy it, you deserve it and enjoy it. Thanks for the journey and build. You are a PROFESSIONAL.

Best health this year and my your desires be yours.

Nelson

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14 hours ago, Spinneyhill said:

If this one is anything to go by, letters are equally spaced.

 

They cannot: all letters have more or less the same length (they are 18 mm to 18.3mm, except the letter "I" which is significantly narrower at 8mm). The letter "N" in the middle of the word is exactly on the car's centerline; the letters "C" and "L" are at the same distance from the emblem. Therefore, the distance between the letters at the left group is slightly larger than the distance between letters at the right side. As the distance between letters is rather large, our eyes don't perceive a difference.

Of course, I'm open for another theory!

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I see now, we are talking at cross purposes, LoL! You are using distances between letters, I am using distance between centres of letters! The same number of letters are on each side in the same arc so they are at equal centre distances on the arc. If it were in type, is it called monospaced? - each letter fits inside the same sized invisible box, like from a typewriter, but the letters themselves occupy different amounts of that box.  

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I see your theory; maybe you are right. I will first glue the letters, one letter at the time, waiting 5 to 8 minutes for the glue to set before the next one will be glued, etc. I will be using, after the tests I did, a 2 k glue, which means preparing the smallest quantity as possible for 1 letter, repeating that process for the 10 remaining letters. A busy day!

If the word is OK to the eye, I may try your method for the hood. Here the letters have more space between each other; it may not be important if there is a variation.

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As the jig is ready, why wait longer to glue the letters? To avoid scratches on the paint, I glued a piece of paper at the “B” side of the jig. Then, I attached it temporarily on the trunk and I tried if the first letter, the middle “N” would fit. As the jig was not following the curve from the trunk lid, the letter went a bit under the jig. I tried to restore its position with a screwdriver and I heard “tic” and no N anymore. Nothing around the car…No good at all. As I had no clue about the possible path, I began to search on the floor in the supposed way; I found nothing. Nothing? Not true: I found a partly finished part from a hinge which flew years ago! After maybe two hours without positive result, I decided to remove the jig and correct its shape. And what did I saw? The “N”! It did not fly away, but went under the jig! What a relief!

Indeed, I could glue 3 letters each time; therefore I had to prepare less 2 K glue. I will have to clean a bit the lid (I put too much glue at the first letter); I will wait 1 or 2 days to do that.

Indeed, I’m satisfied; the distance between letters may not be the same left and right, but it’s hard no notice it.

 

 

1067 Gluing the letters.JPG

1068 Name plate ready.JPG

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Yeah, that really looks good and it only looks better after Spinneyhill's picture of a "real" Mark II.   I keep going back and forth between them and it is truly mind boggling... you'd think that *something* would be misplaced or not scaled correctly on the model... not so.  The 'L' is a nice detail... I would have placed it further down to the chrome bar, roughly in line with the 'C', instead it is a little higher up.  If you look at the "real" Mark II you'll notice that it is also a little higher up.   I guess that's the difference between aligning on centers and edges.  Great detail.

Edited by Luv2Wrench (see edit history)
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