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Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12


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When the rear is done (more or less) well, the efforts have to be directed at the front of the engine. The front cover is a real nice part, an easy one in my mind. So easy? not quite! I had many hours invested in that tiny brass part. I began on the wrong side as I should have done the flange of the water pump first. I did more mistakes, all corrected since (brass is a very nice material to work with).

What next? Between the cover and the block, there is a cast part doing the bridge and on which the cover/water pump is installed. That will be the next part. The bores for the screws will be done all together. I have nice .8 mm screws for that job!<!-- google_ad_section_end -->

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With the excitation of new parts to do, I forget easely the ones which are ready, for example the wheel covers. They are still unplated, this has to be corrected. Now, all 6 covers are on a frame ready for plating. The 2 thin moldings on the picture are for the Avanti, I forgot to let plate them.
The valve covers will be media blasted and chromed. This is the reason they are not on the same tree as the wheelcovers.

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Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)
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Now don't you dare tell us you do your own plating also. You put us all to shame. Great job. Really enjoy your work and progress.

No, no! I don't do it myself! All the Avanti and Toronado parts were plated in a small company not far away from home. They do work for the watch industry, therefore they are not afraid with small parts.

Thank you for your comments; I'm looking at your progress too!

Edited by Roger Zimmermann
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Last Friday, I could go to the man owning some Mark II. He lifted one of the Mark II at the front suspension/bumper and let rest the back of the car on the rear bumper, allowing me to go under the vehicle. A picture is showing the set-up.

I could measure mostly what I was missing; I should have work now for one year!

Even if building the frame right now is tempting because in a few hours there is a lot done, I continue for the moment with the engine. I could almost finish the transition between the front cover and the block.

The cover is mainained with real screws, some are in front of the engine. The diameter is .8 mm (about .032"); I buy them in Germany.

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Doing the basic shape of the engine was rather quick. Now, like a Christmas tree, the block must be dressed. Not with the same items, but, for a model, it's like for a tree: the dressing is making it nicer.

Thanks to good pictures I got, I could do most of the small details which are added to the naked block. This morning, I added the last piece brazed on the form; the intense heat it letting melting the terminated joints which is not desirable. For this reason, the remaining small fittings will be soft soldered. The rework will be also more easy; however, the diamond tools I bought recently will not be used with the soft soldering; I will use my worn steel milling cutters.

The holes, threaded or not, will be done later. The "decorative" ones will be done when the block is completely finished; the ones used to attach the various accessories will be done when the accessories (fuel pump, brackets for the generator, etc.) will be ready.

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Is this a '56 or a '57 engine? The '57 has a spin-on oil filer while the '56 has a replaceable filter element in a canister.

Your work is amazing.

Thank you Barry!

The engine is a '56 with its specific air cleaner. I will do the '56 canister like pictured in the shop manual. This would be another quick part do do before the heads or water pump!

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After doing the main part of the engine, it's time to do the secondary elements; one of them is the water pump. It's a small part, easy at first glance, but not so when I began to evaluate the dimensions. Thanks to Pat Marshall from Mark II forum, I got nice pictures and one major dimension.

The base plate was easy to do, its form is dictated by the distribution chain cover; the remaining elements were not so easy.

One difficulty was to soft solder the reinforcment ribs, one after the other, without that the ones already finished were disturbed while the solder went lquid again on the whole part.

Anyway, I have the impression that I did it right as you may see on the pictures. The part got a light coat of surfacer; the uniform gray color aids to reveal the intricate form. The holes in the fan hub are not yet done; I have first to do the fan and then do the bores all together.

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Actually Roger's real genius is that he has created a parts duplicator with scale function. He isn't really creating these masterpieces by hand, rather he is takes an original part, scans it into his duplicator and then has it generate a new part at 1:12 scale. The pictures of the parts in progress is just an elaborate scheme to hide the existence of the parts duplicator. It is thought that Roger used alien technology for the scaled rendering portion of his device, thus the extra need for secrecy.

There simply is no other way to explain the level of detail and craftsmanship.

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Of course, this part is not yet finished. It's one of both cylinder heads. The second one is not far away, on the second picture it is on my huge vice.

As both heads are identical, I can do both more or less together, trying to avoid the errors I could do on the first one. Sometimes the errors are fatal: I did some calculation errors on the base plate; I had to discard both and do new ones...

At first, I thought that the heads will be difficult to do; in fact, they are relatively simple. Of course, there are some bumps, but nothing impossible when each detail is taken separately. Easier than the water pump!

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As someone who has done plastic scale models this is just amazing. Someone of his skill is no mere craftsman he is a master of his art. There are many many scale modelers out there that are or would be envious of his skill. And to do it all with basic equipment is insane. Modern modelers use cnc lathes and milling machines made on a small scale. Very very few people in this world can do this quality of work.

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As someone who has done plastic scale models this is just amazing. There are many many scale modelers out there that are or would be envious of his skill. And to do it all with basic equipment is insane. Modern modelers use cnc lathes and milling machines made on a small scale. Very very few people in this world can do this quality of work.

Thank you Anson for your comments. When I began seriously with models, it was 1966 with the Toronado. CNC machines had yet to be invented and my wallet would not have allowed such sophisticated equipement. Now, this kind of machines are certainly more afordable, but what is the interest to puch a button (after programming) to have the part? If I would do models as a profession, I would have such equipement, the parts would certainly be perfect (they are not the way I'm doing them) and I would not have the time to show what I'm doing!

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The form of the heads may be easy, to do them is another story! However, they are on a good way. The flanges for the intake manifold are done; I still have to do the flanges for the exhaust manifolds. To simplify the work, I have also to do the flanges for the intake and exhaust manifold when I'm doing to respective flange for the heads, otherwise it would be rather difficult to match the form more or less exactly. Flanges are bored together (the one on the haed and the corresponding one for the manifold).

The holes or passages for the intake or exhaust will not be done; it would add hours of work for nothing.

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The wheelcovers and valve covers were more than one month at the plater; I assume he was very busy! Today, I could pick-up the finished parts. I installed on a temporary basis the valve covers on the heads; the heads themselves are ready with the exception of the provision to fix the valve covers.

I could not resist to the temptation to do some holes at the intake ans exhaust flanges; it's better looking! I know that the passages are restangular, but they will stay round.

Another view shows the wheelcovers on the "tree"; I have to release them and put some black adhesive foil between the vanes.

As I got nice pictures from the fan and water pump pulley, it will be the next task.

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It seems that it's the end of the year; it seems also that I will not finish my engine till 2011!

After the water pump pulley, I did the cover of the push rods. I was missing good infos on that piece; the part I did has more to do with guessing than copying. This is not that important because, when the intake manifold will be installed (it has to be constructed first) that cover is almost totally hidden. The provision to screw the cover is not yet done; the plan is that the cover will be held with two .7 mm screws (0.028").

The black portion between the vanes of the wheelcovers is done with foil as paint is impractical to apply. Please note that I added a valve stem!

One picture is with, the other one without flash.

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Roger,

I’m beginning to thinking that there has to be some sort of trick photography going on here. I’m thinking too that you in your final reveal you’ve worked out something with Barry Wolk and we are going to see some clandestine pictures of his Mark II.:D If it turns out not to be the case maybe the truth will finally come out in the end through an innocent WikiLeaks posting that was passed on to someone within Julian Assange’s group.:eek:

Humor aside, these little peaks at the many small parts of the whole has most if not all of us that are following along mentally visualizing and anticipating the final product. Evidence to date sure paints a wonderful picture.

With that I too would like to pass on my wish to you and your family a Happy, Healthy and Productive New Year. Remaining patient but observant, Scott…

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  • 3 weeks later...

Engine are full of difficult parts; the water pump was one of these; the part pictured is another one. It's rather strange looking: it should be an intake manifold when ready. I have many pictures from this part, unfortunately assembled on an engine, with carb and other accessories. They hide the interesting details; I'm progressing very slowly, mostly with guessing and trying.

I had already the same difficulties with the intake manifold from the Toronado and the one from the Avanti; new engine, old story!.

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It's rather strange looking: it should be an intake manifold when ready.

Roger,

But it’s nothing but a lump of metal?:confused:

I guess one needs a good bit of imagination during this step in the construction process.:confused:

One can only imagine what it really takes to create these individual parts. I’m sure without question it will turn out proper in the end. Oh, and just to let you know, these little peeks into the part in process are quite interesting in themselves. Scott…

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Roger,

But it’s nothing but a lump of metal?:confused:

I guess one needs a good bit of imagination during this step in the construction process.:confused:

One can only imagine what it really takes to create these individual parts. I’m sure without question it will turn out proper in the end. Oh, and just to let you know, these little peeks into the part in process are quite interesting in themselves. Scott…

I think I see the intake tubes and the pad for the carburetor in that "lump of metal". C'mon Scott...get into the ZEN of the model. Can you see it, now?

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Roger...a friend was over to my house yesterday and he makes models. He is working on reproducing a 1:16 scale (I believe) model of the Reeves Octoauto. I just HAD to show him this thread with your miniature car. He was stunned and amazed! He will now be a watcher of this thread, I am certain. Keep up the good work and it is a fabulous display of your talent. John

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I think I see the intake tubes and the pad for the carburetor in that "lump of metal"

You see correctly; you have a good imagination! On the other side, I have no idea what a Reeves Octoauto might look like! 1:16 is not a common scale; I'm wondering why your friend choose it; he could also publish what he is doing!

To Scott: when a part is cleary defined, like a pulley or the air cleaner, things are relatively easy to do. When a part is like the intake manifold with no clear dimensions (except the ones I have from the now existing block) it takes hours to see at pictures and try to decompose in small and easy parts.

When I was at the real car, I took a grat deal of pictures. However, as I was not in the construction mode, I took the wrong ones or at the wrong angle!

The finished manifold should look like the small attached picture.

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Edited by Roger Zimmermann
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Guest Dave Boyer

Being new to this forum, I just found this today...I'm totally in awe of your craftsmanship.

The skill you have, is amazing, it's people like you that built the world to what it is today. I am also surprised at the size of your lathe..I imagined it being a small lathe, until the picture that included your fingers! I didn't imagine it that small.

I had a customer that was a watch maker, and every time I was lucky enough to have the time to visit him, it was truly amazing. Just like this. Craftsmanship like this is almost a lost art these days.

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