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Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12


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When parts are difficult to realize, I have the bad habit to push away their construction. The small conduit for the wiring at the doors is one of those…Before I’m beginning with the body preparation, I had to do them. At first, by looking at the real pieces I did not understand the shape behind the pillar and decided to do it my way. Then I saw that the wiring would hit the door’s pillar…Therefore the hook was needed. I had to install and remove the door many times to have the right shape but, as 11 wires have to take place in that conduit on the LH door, I increased the dimensions a tad. For that reason, I had also to enlarge the aperture at the pillar…On the RH door, there are only 5 wires and that piece could be done marginally thinner.

Doing this small addition let me take a decision: normally, door hinges are assembled with a not removable shaft. I had that on the RH door and I realized that when the conduit is in place, the aperture of the door is reduced, preventing to install all the screws at the pillar. When I tried to attach the hinges at the pillar and then to install the door at the hinges, I had so many difficulties to find the holes for the screws I decided the make the final assembly just by inserting a shaft into the hinges. When the front fender are installed, nobody will notice this trick.

The conduit is the unpainted piece between both hinges.

902 conduit.JPG

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  • 2 weeks later...

A quick update about the work: I’m preparing the body for the paint. It’s a tedious work as the shape of the car is rather complex. The picture is almost like a real car in a body shop with some progress. There are high and low spots; when sanding the red epoxy primer, most of the high spots are gone, but not always: when the brass can be seen, it has obviously not the correct shape. Some brass can be removed by filing, but I have to stop before the material is too thin or, worse, has a hole. Low spots are filled up with some filler. Once sanded, the surface is getting a thin coat of primer and the chase to high/low sports continue…I was convinced that the LH rear quarter was fine and as you can see on the picture, it was not.

Hood, roof and trunk lid are ready; the remaining elements not yet. It will take a long time until I will be satisfied.

During curing time, I’m covering some parts with leather which is .1 to .2 mm (0.004 to 0.008”) thick; unfortunately, the leather I have is not the right color. I will show the covered parts only when they have been painted with the proper color; I’m awaiting leather paint for the next few days.

903 body work.JPG

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Indeed, I did both way with a rough fitting before the work I'm doing now. I jut noticed that the LH door, which I thought it was finished, does not follow too much the rear quarter profile. If each body component would be finished individually without checking the whole picture, the end result would be...not good.

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Roger,

Now this is where it gets down to the finite.  Fit and finish is everything in body and paint.  I just had a car done (6 months ago) and it is a 1:1.  Much easier than a 1:12.  They did a very good job and my Spider is going back together soon.  I handed them a "shell" completely stripped of all the interior and exterior trim, windshield frame, etc., etc.  The manager of the body shop had his guys on my car for a long time getting every detail finessed.  The end results were first class.  We walked around the car and could not find one flaw, run, or door, trunk or hood that was not aligned perfectly.  All in all, I was quite pleased.  Being in the small scale as 1:12, it must be exact too.  We can not wait to see the end results of the body work/paint job.

Randy

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  • 2 weeks later...

Even if I was quite lately, work is continuing. It's not making sense to show each filler application or sanding!. The main body (rear fenders, roof, doors and trunk lid) are at 95% satisfying. I still have some improvements to do, especially at the cross panel between trunk lid and back window. We had a wonderful October month; therefore, I could do most of the surfacer job outside. Today, we said goodbye to the summertime and hello to the wintertime, the weather is getting cooler and humid.

I ordered the paint for the leather; it’s water based and I have to spray it with my airbrush because it seems that water based colors cannot be sold in a rat can. The blue paint for the leather is rather darker than the original medium blue. As the outside paint is also different, I choose a blue which is in harmony with the outside color. With the white bolsters, I will give a good contrast.

On the first picture, 3 leather parts at the right are ready to install, one with some chrome trim. The other parts are ready to be painted; the lower door trim panels will be done next. As you can see, I’m using quite a few leather colors; I just hope that I will have enough. The thickness is between 0.1 and 0.2 mm (0.004 to 0.008”); thicker leather cannot be used. The second picture is my leather’s stock.

 

904 Trim parts.JPG

905 Leather.JPG

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Roger,

Intricate work.   Are you using French glove leather?  When researching the leather for the Pocher, I was directed to that particular leather as it was the thinnest available.  And after getting it,  there was a spot that I needed to have it thinner.  It can be "sanded" on the back side for an even thinner application of the leather.  Being in Switzerland, they have the finest leathers available, yes? 

 

Randy 

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After about 8 days without phone and Internet, I can communicate again!

Randy, I have no idea for which application the leather I have was used for. Up to now, the gloves I had in hand had a leather too thick for my need. Also, I doubt that gloves with a leather 0.1 mm thick would not tear the first time of use!

 

Yes, Randy, the back can be "sanded" with coarse sand paper; I'm doing that very often. With a thin leather, the risk to make a hole is not negligible.

Edited by Roger Zimmermann
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For 8 days, due to an outside “repair”, we had no phone, TV nor Internet; very annoying! The positive aspect: I was less distracted and I could spend more time with the model. Many leather trim parts could be painted; this allowed me to install definitively some chrome parts. As usual, when parts are plated, even if the coat is very thin, there can be some problems like I had to insert the A/C levers into their respective slots.

When parts are covered with leather, even a very thin one, there are also difficulties to assemble elements, even if some play was considered during fabrication. Up to now, I could overcome the difficulties without damages. You see below some elements which are ready or, like the front seat, in preparation. The “cushions” for the seat back are not yet covered with leather, this is the next task. The robe cord for the seat back is also missing, the escutcheons must be chromed first.

I like the look of the lower door trim panels; I pictured the back of the LH panel; will I be able to connect all those wires?

 

 

906 front seat.JPG

907 front seat back.JPG

908 door trim.JPG

909 many wires.JPG

911 mirror and sunshades.JPG

910 controls.JPG

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Wonderful work and detailing,its a always a pleasure to watch your build.

 

9 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

For 8 days, due to an outside “repair”, we had no phone, TV nor Internet; very annoying! The positive aspect: I was less distracted and I could spend more time with the model. Many leather trim parts could be painted; this allowed me to install definitively some chrome parts. As usual, when parts are plated, even if the coat is very thin, there can be some problems like I had to insert the A/C levers into their respective slots.

When parts are covered with leather, even a very thin one, there are also difficulties to assemble elements, even if some play was considered during fabrication. Up to now, I could overcome the difficulties without damages. You see below some elements which are ready or, like the front seat, in preparation. The “cushions” for the seat back are not yet covered with leather, this is the next task. The robe cord for the seat back is also missing, the escutcheons must be chromed first.

I like the look of the lower door trim panels; I pictured the back of the LH panel; will I be able to connect all those wires?

 

 

906 front seat.JPG

907 front seat back.JPG

908 door trim.JPG

909 many wires.JPG

911 mirror and sunshades.JPG

910 controls.JPG

 

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Wow Roger ! ! !

 

I am particularly impressed with the trim piece that has the sun visors.  The fit and finish on all the parts are absolute perfection but the visors really capture the outstanding symmetry and fine detail of the scale.  Viewing the parts on the headliner will be difficult (unless you are 1:12 scale) The viewer will need a dentist's oral mirror to see all the wonders that you have captured in the overhead.  I really like the color.  Outstanding 

 

Randy

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Randy, thanks for the comments! At first, that blue tone was not what I expected but, the more I see it, the more I like it. I forgot to say that the sunshades are movable in 2 directions: to hide the sun when it's in front of the driver and on the side too. Will that be easy to operate when assembled? I doubt!

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The work is going on with the seats. With the exception of the robe cords (parts must be chromed), the front seat is ready as well as the rear cushion. Right now, I’m working on the central armrest; this is why only the upper part of the back rest is ready The most difficult aspect at the seats is the welting done with the same color as the inserts.

Even with very thin leather, there are sometimes bad surprises…To continue the rear seat, I had to install the side trim panels. Some modifications were required because 4 thin leather are almost ½ mm thick!

 

 

912 Front seat ready.JPG

913 rear seat.JPG

Edited by Roger Zimmermann
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Roger,

 

Dang !  Those seats look so real.  The fit and finish is much better than on my 1:8 scale Pocher.  The Swiss craftsman!  We have a member of the Pocher community that is in Switzerland and his Pocher R.R. is immaculate.  But he is starting with a kit and, like most of the Pocher builders,  heavily modify  the kit.  Injection molding from thirty to fourty years ago leaves a heck of a lot to be desired.  There are parts that are after market that are available.  Fellow modelers develop better and more accurate parts. The improved parts,  in that community,  really make the models first rate.  If you took the time to do them yourself, you would be years in the making of the model  (just like you).  No Continental builders club to go to for specialized parts.  You have the satisfaction to know that when you are done, that car is all yours.  

 

As you said, it is really a shame that the viewer will not see 90% of the detail that you put into this beautiful model.  BUT what is available to the eye..................................Astounding.

 

Randy

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Roger,

 

It is amazing how crisp and clean the lines on the upholstery are.  Not a tiny imperfection anywhere!  From the pictures, the seats and the insert look like the real thing.  Masterful

 

We are celebrating Thanksgiving this week and all of us have eaten too much.  Thank goodness Monday is tomorrow and we can get back to work to burn off all those calories.  

 

Randy 

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Thanks for the comments, Randy! My seats are nice, but not perfect. My method to add the welting is to have separate parts, gluing the welting on one part and then gluing the second one to the assembly. If the welting have been the same color as the seats, some small imperfections with the distance welting/seat would get unnoticed. But with a contrasting color...Well, it's just a model!

I'm not happy with the last element of the rear seat: the cover which close the cavity when the center arm rest is down. I tried first with an unpainted bit of leather. Was good, but with the painted leather, well, the sides are not doing what I expected....Well, it's just a model!

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Roger, I think your results at miniatures is better than the Duesenberg. Many items don't appear to follow a consistent scale and some even look clumsy. Your examples follow scale far better. I don't think I've found any visible discrepancies in the Continental.

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12 hours ago, Bleach said:

Roger, I think your results at miniatures is better than the Duesenberg. Many items don't appear to follow a consistent scale and some even look clumsy. Your examples follow scale far better. I don't think I've found any visible discrepancies in the Continental.

Well, it seems that you know Duesenberg cars better than me! From the various pictures I saw from this model, nothing looked strange to me but, I'm really not a specialist from that type of cars. Next to that, I have a few remarks: I was fortunate enough to have access to 3 Mark II. When I was in doubt about a dimension, I went to that place located at about 8 miles from home. I notices that evaluating a dimension based on one or more pictures can led to a wrong result. I suppose that Mr. Chenet had not an access to a Duesenberg like I had for the Mark II.

Depending of the kind of material used like brass instead of steel, some dimensions have to be exaggerated for strength.

Another point: the scale. I believe that the Duesenberg is 1:6 while mine is 1:12. I could never do a 1:6 model in my flat! In 1:12, some details can be skipped and nobody will notice but, at 1:6 every detail must be done; this could led to some inconsistency.

The last point: the Duesenberg is from 1932, my model is from 1956.

All these elements are making a comparaison extremely difficult; anyway, I do find that Duesenberg super!

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Thanks Dileep! Yes, they are looking comfortable, it's just an illusion as the support is just wood! For the floor, I'm planning to use dark blue velvet, unless somebody has a better idea.

 

The rear seat is now done. The central arm rest gave me trouble. At the end, it’s not exactly the way I expected but I cannot change it: when the arm rest is stored, it squeezes the leather against the levers and elongate it. When the arm rest is down, the side of the hiding panel is unfortunately no more under tension.

Well, after all, it’s just a model!

It’s now time to go to the side quarter and door panels and do the inserts.

914 rear seat.JPG

915 rear seat.JPG

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10 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

Well, it seems that you know Duesenberg cars better than me! From the various pictures I saw from this model, nothing looked strange to me but, I'm really not a specialist from that type of cars. Next to that, I have a few remarks: I was fortunate enough to have access to 3 Mark II. When I was in doubt about a dimension, I went to that place located at about 8 miles from home. I notices that evaluating a dimension based on one or more pictures can led to a wrong result. I suppose that Mr. Chenet had not an access to a Duesenberg like I had for the Mark II.

Depending of the kind of material used like brass instead of steel, some dimensions have to be exaggerated for strength.

Another point: the scale. I believe that the Duesenberg is 1:6 while mine is 1:12. I could never do a 1:6 model in my flat! In 1:12, some details can be skipped and nobody will notice but, at 1:6 every detail must be done; this could led to some inconsistency.

The last point: the Duesenberg is from 1932, my model is from 1956.

All these elements are making a comparaison extremely difficult; anyway, I do find that Duesenberg super!

 

Yes, I've seen my share of Duesenbergs and was able to spend quite a bit of time up and close around a couple of JB Nethercutt's Duesenbergs, one of them the famous 20 Grand, while he was still alive.

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Roger,

 

There is a thread (on the AACA Forum) from Gary W, member 623; " Restoration of a 37 Buick Model 48 has started"  is inspiration to us out here doing a 1:1 car.   I interrupted the progress on my Fiat 124 Spider when I made the decision to acquire the 36 Pontiac Master 6 Coupe.  What this gentleman has done in one year on his restoration is inspiration to all of us.  He is a younger man with two young sons helping him in his garage, which is as clean a garage as I have seen!  If you start reading that thread, you will not quit !   He is doing a superb job with only the painting, plating and a few other services  done by others.   The rest he is doing himself. 

 

As you have restored many cars in the past, you will appreciate what he has accomplished and the quality of his work.

Randy 

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Randy, I had a look at this thread. Impressive, but too many pictures for my taste. I did not look at all pages, because it's too detailed but I'm sure that somebody restoring a similar car will enjoy all the details. When I restored my cars, I did many pictures but way less than this example. For 2 reasons: the pictures were analog and it would cost a small fortune to do so much and at that time, there was no Internet to publish what I was doing. The process was about the same with differences on cars about 20 years younger.

 

Now, my latest update:

 

The inserts are done. Sometimes with discouragement: the quarter and door trim panels must be assembled to see if clearance and alignment are corrects; I could no more assemble the upper door moldings! Without leather is was already not an easy task to find the holes for the screws; the leather, even if very thin, prevents the screw to engage the thread. What to do? Thinking out of the box, I decided that the screw will be there just for the show and the moldings will be inserted into the door panel with a “blade” I glued to the part. Unfortunately, due to a different construction, I cannot do that system for the rear quarters. As that upper molding must be assembled from inside the car, I hope that I will succeed.

Anyway, the door and quarter panel inserts are done; basically, the interior is at 95% ready, electrical work not included.

It was then time to polish the parts which were no good after the nickel plating, as well as the front bumper which had a chrome adhesion problem. This time, only the letters for twice the name “Continental” will be plated with nickel; the other parts which were first plated with nickel are now on the small tree to be chromed. The attachment method to the tree is marginal; I hope nothing will be lost.

The other tree has the bumper and other “heavy” parts; they will be able to get more current then the more delicate parts.

The first picture is showing the alphabet soup; the second picture shows that closed cage and both tree.

916 letters.JPG

917 the last batch.JPG

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Fortunately, I did not went today to the plating company: By sorting the finished parts, I found 4 unplated escutcheons for the front seat back! They are now attached to the tree with small parts; you can compare with the picture above to see what I added!

918 completed tree.JPG

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Roger,  

 

I have a question.  When you put the small letters in the plating "box" does it get agitated for plating on both sides?  Or do you get one side plated only?  If the letters are laying on the screen in the box, is there a partial plating of the back side?  If so, I guess that the plater has to make sure that the letters are all facing "up" to get the front of the letters plated.  

 

Sorry about the issue with your screws not being able to go through the leather and into the proper screw holes.  As always, there is a solution to the problem at hand.

 

Randy

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This is a question for which I have no answer. The first time I put letters into a cage, the result was very good, with the letters plated both sides, no matter how they are in the cage. Anyway, I put the letters myself into the cage and I don't look especially if they are on the "good" side or not. As the cage is going into various bathes, they will not stay the way I put them into.

I went today with the latest batches; I will have the answer in some weeks...

Right now, I'm doing the wiring for the spark plugs. It's more complicated than anticipated because the wires are placed into 4 guides. At first, I intended to do the spacers with rubber; in fact I'm doing them with black plastic. The pictures will follow when it's ready.

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Yesterday, I could finish the spark plus wires. Obviously, I’m getting older: I had more difficulties to install the wires than anticipated. My eyes are no more what they were once…

Even if there are still some small items to fabricate, they will be done during the final assembly, with the hope that no damage will be done to the finish. It’s now a good time to turn back at the body. The main part is almost ready; I still have trouble with the LH lower rear quarter with some slight ripples. The roof is almost perfect; it’s easier to get at a good shape with the roof because its more rounded that the sides.

If the doors are in a good alignment with the front fenders, they are ready. As you can see, the front fenders are now in work. To verify their alignment with the main body, the parts will be installed on the frame. As water is involved with sanding, all parts which are now attached to the frame will be removed.

 

919 with spark plug wires.JPG

920 Body shop.JPG

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Mr. Z., you may think your eyes are not as good as earlier years and that you have more sanding to do to make the rear quarter right, but if you threw it all in a basket and said it was complete, it would be SO much better than I could do or have done at my best. Truly amazing sir, I do so enjoy your posts so much.  You are always the 1st place I look on this forum.  Thanks for being you and sharing your talent.   John

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