Jump to content

Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12


Recommended Posts

The engine is now almost ready. Missing are the spark plus wires and some decals. Of course, the parts which are chromed are not yet installed; the plating company is close for vacation. Now, it’s time to have a look at the body or at the seats…

886 Engine paint.JPG

887 Engine paint.JPG

888 Engine paint.JPG

889 Engine paint.JPG

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Beautiful work Roger.  Fantastic.  The engine shows so much detail.  Do you make the decals too?  I know that there is a program (in photo shop?) that is for the modelers to make them but I never have.  What are you using for the ignition wires?  Will they have "boots" or metal clips?  

 

Randy

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Randy! Indeed, I have repro decals, scale 1:1. I had once an address locally from a guy doing decals and who could do decals from the real ones (I don't have this possibility and I don't want to begin with it), after an hard disk crash, I lost many addresses. Maybe I will find him again.

The wires will be done with...electrical wires. The boots will be made with brass.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Roger. I use a vinyl with an adhesive backing (sticker type material) that can be printed on with an ink jet printer. If you have a way to import the real decal image into a program that you can scale it down you could print it on the printable vinyl. Not sure whats available in Switzerland. I do it all the time for the plaques I make. Just a thought.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Roger,

 

If you cannot find anyone in your area, there are plenty of guys that can make the decals.  If you have the 1:1 decals, they can scale them down to 1:12 and print them off on decal material.  Here in San Diego, I know of an individual who can assist you if needed.

 

Randy

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

It’s time to do another report…As the weather was fine locally; I decided to begin the seats, made with wood, working outside. Why? working with wood is creating a lot of dust, doing that outside is a method to spare a lot of cleaning!

As I’m not well equipped for woodwork, to get where I’m today took a lot of time. Plus, there was some remodeling in the flat: I had to take out the office/workshop all which was stored: tools, plastic scale models of cars and planes, clothing and so on. It’s incredible what I could store in such a small room! Once the floor was ready, almost everything came back again, usually cleaned. I’m glad it’s behind me!

Back to the seats: the inserts are not yet prepared; I will have also to install the motors for the windows and front seat with the hope that the motors will have the necessary room.

891 seats.JPG

890 seats.JPG

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Roger,

Looks like  you had to dismantle the car to work on the interior.  Will the seats be sprung authenticating the real seats?  there are voids in the middle of the seats.  With your talent for making springs, I am guessing that the centers of the seat bottoms and seat backs will be "wired" for spring action giving the feel of the real seats.  I am just guessing as we will have to wait and see what you do here with the forms.  We can only contemplate what you are going to do.  Looking forward to the next post showing us what is next.

 

Randy

Link to post
Share on other sites

Indeed, the body was removed for the paint preparation. However, I thought it was maybe better to look for the seats before the car is painted! If the front seat could be done outside, the rear seat has to be shaped by trying to put it inside. I'm glad I did that now and not later.

Contrary to your hope, the inserts will be wood to. Sure, springs could be done, but space, especially for the rear seat, is critical due to the window's motors. I prefer to have an original look as near as possible v/s a soft feel at the seats.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm really glad I began the seats before the paint was done, because I have a really bad surprise: if the motor for the front seat has enough space under the wood seat, it's not the case at the rear: the location I choose to attach the motors to the body it not good: the rear of the motor is higher than the seat...the first picture is showing it, the motor is not lying on the rear floor but on the rise to clear the frame. I will have to move the motors near the car's center as it can be seen on the second picture, and adapt the output shaft with a bearing. Now, the roof is there, I will have some more difficulties to make the correction...

 

 

766 Ready.JPG

765 Installed.JPG

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the idea; unfortunately, the "new" position of the electric motor is making an angle to the mechanism of the window. I need a flexible connection and due to the length of the shaft, a bearing near the window as the torque to open or close the window may crate problems.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Roger,

 

I have seen very small universal joints that will suffice without losing the torque of the drive motor.  The key  is to find the right combination of universal and thrust bearing(s) at the window mechanism.  And that is where you will succeed as you have a better "handle" on the issue.  We can only speculate what you are up against.  It is another to be there in person with the problem at hand, mulling over how you are going to attack the problem.  With the micro industries all over the world now, so many options are available compared to 15 years ago.  I am sure that the needed parts are out there or..........you will build them yourself !

We will await the end of September to see what you have come up with.   

 

Randy

Link to post
Share on other sites

The solution came yesterday: a helicoidal spring with the proper inside diameter! It's enough to transmit the available torque and allow the second shaft to have the desired angle and no variation at he rotation speed! (even if this not so important here). Plus, it's easy to do!

Link to post
Share on other sites

The motors have now a new place well under the seat (I tested this time!). The side module for the windows is elongated, offering that way a “bearing” for the shaft. The attached pictures are showing the new configuration; I “just” have now to make a new lever and a hub at the motor to attach the spring acting as a universal joint. Working inside the car, compared to the situation before the roof was soldered, is not so dramatic.

 

 

IMG_0470.JPG

IMG_0473.JPG

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Roger, could you flip the lever at the window so that it pointed downward, then mount the lever driven by the motor down at the floorboard with it pointing upward to allow the shaft to remain lower and straighter ? This would change the direction of the window from the current motor rotation but that's not an issue since you are already rotating the motor both directions, it would just mean that the old "up" rotation is now the "down" and vise versa.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the idea Paulie! This suggestion would require more modifications and an elongated side module extension to locate the bearing at a lower point. I'm too far now in the present modifications to follow your advise. That shaft going up has no impact anymore to the seat; as I wrote, I checked! It has also the benefit to be at the right angle to the side module wich means that the lever at the end of the shaft will be moving parallel to the side module/panel.

I rechecked again your idea: unfortunately, the body reinforcement is in the way for the lever to be flipped down: I need a movement of about 100°; if I pull the lever towards the center of the car, the conflict with the arm rest is programmed!

Edited by Roger Zimmermann
Comment added (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Well Hooray !

Another problem solved.  And it was a big one.  I am glad that you were able to find a working solution that will not hamper or compromise the operation of the window.  

 

The first time that an admirer is looking at the model and you depress the switch and the window rolls up or down, the expression on their face(s) will be....... amazement.  Much like the first time that we saw your site and the construction steps of the model.  

 

The Continental has come a long way since you were casting the tires.  I am still amazed as to how you got the lettering in the molds, finishing up with perfect little 1:12 tires.  The detail is phenomenal. And the work on the hubcaps........Truly a work of art.  it boggles the mind to see the detail that is added at each step.    

 

It is always cool to see you overcome the issues and filling us in on how you accomplished the task.      

 

Randy

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

It’s not the first time I did universal joints; there is always a lot of machining, therefore time consuming. As you see on the pictures, the RH rear quarter motor/transmission is ready. I had some issues not related to the new position as I could not lower the window completely or, when completely down, it would not go up…Fortunately, after a lot of trying I found the reason: there was an interference between the guide head and a rivet. With a distance piece pushing the guide away from the base plate, the window is getting down. A longer link between the transmission and the crank for the window, it’s going up too! I got also a small benefit on top of that: the movement up and down is smoother than before. Now, I can do the same for the LH quarter window

 

 

894 installed motor.JPG

895 installed motor.JPG

896 universal joint.JPG

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

After about one month at the plating company, the fourth batch is back yesterday afternoon. At first, it seems that all the parts are well plated. The small cage with the parts to be nickeled is back too. I hope that I did not forget something and this is the last batch…

898 fourth batch chromed.JPG

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Roger,

 

We are all gratified to see that the window motor drive issue is sorted out and that there was success with your efforts.  It is always good to read and see your solution for the problem at hand.  That was a big problem solved.  Now the seats can be fitted and finished to complete the rear seating area.  Amazement always follows every  time that we log onto your site.  Now with cool weather setting in, we can return to seeing progress being made with the Continental.  I am sending you at article in this months Hemmings Classic Cars.  They are featuring a 1956 Continental.  Many stories have been written about the Continental but this man owns one that is very nice.  It has the original interior and the engine bay is refurbished.  It is very informative to see what a 1:1 Continental engine and accessories looks like.  I will scan the article and send it to you.

 

Looking forward to the next post.

 

Randy 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Roger

I know you are building in such a small scale but what about a worm wheel and gear. That would take the over torque out of the motor and it would slow down the action of the window movement. With this method the motor could be mounted anywhere space is available. The drive would be a cable turning the gears.  The image added is for a Mercedes Replacement Window Motors (OES Genuine Window Regulator - W0133-1718533 - Front, Driver Side, Power). As always Roger I love what you have accomplished and the length of time you have been working on this beaut. You are more than a craftsman. I have enjoyed the build for many years and I will not lose this site again. Thank you Roger.

image.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Nelson for that proposal; I'm glad you found the thread again!. As you could see, all windows are now operating. When I began to imagine the electric windows for the Toronado model, various system were existing but they were not practical with my tools at this scale. The motors I'm using for the side windows have a reduction of 1:298 which, with 1.5 V, is giving a decent window movement.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Basically, the seats are done. There will be more detail work when I will cover the wood with the leather as the shape of the various elements is done without taking the leather thickness into account. The most demanding element was the rear central armrest. I measured the dimensions of the various levers but, for the first time in 8 years, I lost that piece of paper. I could have gone back to the new Mark II owner but I decided that indeed a rear movable arm rest could not be rocket science! I did first a mechanism with cardboard 5 times the actual parts and saw that, to have a logic movement, precise dimensions is a must. After some trial and errors, I was set and could go with the metal parts. As you can see on the pictures, the arm rest is partly brass and wood.

899 with seats.JPG

900 rear seat.JPG

901 rear seat.JPG

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...