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Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12


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Roger,

WOW !   I hope that you can get all the interior parts in without too much difficulty.  It sure is easier when you have full access.  But you know what you are doing.  It baffles the mind to know that this car is only 1:12.  From the pictures, if the car was sitting on jack stands and posed in a garage with proper perspective, now way would anyone be the wiser to the actual size of the car due to the intricate detail.  Simply amazing.

How did the headliner come out.  The last pic of the headliner looked pretty good.  Is that the final?  Guess so as the roof is now attached to the body.  My nightmare would be getting over spray on the inside of the headliner.  :-(

I am quite sure that you are very careful with the painting.

 

You say that you are using "rattle can" paint?  No air brush?  (just kidding).   At our local automotive paint store, they can put your special color mix in an aerosol can.  That was not available too long ago.  Now for small jobs, I can get the paint in an aerosol can as it is a pain to clean up my spray gun.  I have to take it all apart and clean it thoroughly or the next time I use it......................  :-(    Nothing like hard encrusted paint to clog a small orifice and stop the function of an expensive  gun.

 

Roger, I am going to attempt to do the body and paint on my 36 Plymouth fenders.  The body shops here are sooooo damn expensive.  I decided to bite the bullet and attempt to do my fenders.  The body of the car is fine.  I just need to do the fenders and the bullet headlight shells.  There is no rust on them but I have to strip off two bad paint jobs.  The last guy didn't do that and the finish is all crazed and unsightly.  Plus he didn't put the welting between the fender and the body.  The headlight "bullet" shells have scratches from previous owners or mechanics that were not deft in proper opening and closing of the hoods on both sides and have scratched and dented (one shell) the shells.  I think that I can do them in place with just removing the lense one the one that I have to knock out the dent and then finish sand and prep them for paint.  They would be a pain to remove from the fender mounts. Those and the fenders.  Probably will take me as much time to do as you have invested in the Continental.   :-)    Kidding.  I just have a few bumps to knock out and the alignment is fine.  I have a brand new high end spray gun that I bought just for this.  Have you ever done any body and paint on your cars?  Wish me luck

 

Randy 

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Randy, I hope too that all the inside parts can be installed without trouble! I tried to make the installation easy keeping in mind that once the roof will be there. I will see...

The picture of the headliner was a trial. the cloth is now gone and I improved the shape at the rear to have a surface less flat between two bows. At due time, the cloth will be glued on the shell as a module, with the inside lamp and A/C vents. Then, it will be definitively attached to the roof, once the model is painted as it will be impossible, if attached now, not to damage the cloth with wet sanding and overspray.

I have an airbrush which is used for the industrial surfacer (the read paint on the body). Obviously, I'm lacking experience with that spray medium as my results are so, so. With a rattle can, I have pretty decent painted surfaces, the mix with thinner is always the right one and no painful cleaning after usage!

When I was working for 2 years in a bodyshop between apprenticeship and technical school, the paint manager let me spray a Citroën 2CV. Well, the car was painted, but I could not say I was very proud!

When I restored my cars scale 1:1, I did the paint of all inner metal parts, engine and trunk compartment as well as the firewall. I would say they are not bad done, without dust inclusion (I was working in a barn) but I let paint the outside by a body shop. Expensive, but I don't regret that expense. If the outside surface is perfect, you will get good results on your '36 Plymouth fenders. You probably know that the paint will not hide surface imperfections , like for chrome plating!

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Roger,

 

I would love to see you installing the interior components once the car is painted.   Please post pictures of the step by step of the re installation of the interior parts so we can get an idea as to how you re assemble the car. Man o man, that will be one intricate process with all the little screws holding the parts together.  You MUST have a "shrinking" machine where you step in and step out 1:12 scale to do that job.  :-)   I realize that the windows and doors are not installed but still.............what a job to put all the parts in the car with the roof on.  AND not to scratch the exterior finish while doing so.  This we have got to see.............

 

Randy

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To Randy:

Right now, I began the process of finishing the body by correcting the small misshapen not affected by adjacent panels. The body shell should get a new coat of primer soon.

If my planning is not completely erroneous, the installation of the interior should go without major problems, even with the roof. Fortunately, I don't have big hands! I was able to do the same for the Toronado and Avanti (but they are less complex) , I should succeed again, even if I'm getting older!

 

To keiser31:

Last week, I bought a spray can of a blue metallic and dark gray metallic. I will spry the hood with one paint and trunk lid with the other one and make my choice.

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As we enjoy a nice weather since a few days, I decided that it was time to give a new coat of primer on the body as well as on some parts from the dash board. To get at this, I did some panel corrections and I had a bright idea: to wash to body into the dishwasher. I choose the shortest program with the lowest temperature. The result was brilliant: the previous primer coat peeled! Not everywhere, just on exposed elements like the sills and the top of rear fenders. Why? I don't know. I suppose it was the combined action of heat, washer and washer's impact. Heat alone can be discarded: I soft soldered many items on the body by just removing a stripe of primer; even the heat of the soldering iron had no effect at the primer. I will never again use the dishwasher to clean scale model parts!

I sanded the damaged primer and sprayed yesterday a good coat of primer on the body, doors, hood (which fall on the floor during the process), trunk lid and other parts. I came to the conclusion that spray cans are much more convenient to use that an airbrush with 2-k paint!

 

On the pictures, the body is again on the frame: it just more convenient to have it here until the paint is totally cured.

 

 

 

865 painted roof.JPG

866 painted roof.JPG

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The last few days, I prepared the hood and trunk lid for that paint test. As I can judge, the hood will need very little improvement to be almost perfect; the trunk lid will require more work.

Unfortunately, the paint cans I bought have both rather coarse metallic particles. The colors themselves are not bad, but I will have to search for a finer metallic effect.

Which color do you prefer? Here are my remarks about the colors:

 

Blue: the same paint could be used for the console and glove box, with a satin coat over the blue. Inconvenient: I will have to let prepare paint for the blue leather trim in the same hue.

Dark gray: with that paint, I could use some red leather inside, but I will have to let prepare paint for the console and glove box in the same hue as the leather.

One picture was done with the flash, the other one without it.

 

 

867 hood and trunk.JPG

868 hood and trunk.JPG

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Roger you are the best.I dont like to always keep on praising you as your work is exceptional and outstanding.The car is coming out as a real one.But the pleasure of seeing it in construction phase is always good rather than seeing the completed one.Then you will feel it as a real car.Nobody will miss roger then.

How do you solder the parts.I tried in a scale motorcycle I did.but it was the normal electronic soldering I had.Do you use some special solder as I have seen that once the solder dries it becomes brittle.How is it that it remains strong or is it welding that you do?

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Thanks Dileep!

I'm surprised that your solder get brittle. I suppose you are using soft solder which is a alloy of tin. This type of solder is not very strong unless the soldered surface is consequent. For delicate work, like I did on the hood ornament, you could read that my tentative to soft solder the outer ring ended with a disaster. For that, silver soldering is more suitable, but requires a torch as the melting temperature is about 650-680°C. The inconvenient is that the brass get softer (it is annealed) and can compromise the strength of a part. As you see, a medal has always 2 sides.

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Roger, you just keep on amazing us !  As with some others, I am preferring the blue paint.  I am a bit biased though, because as a painter ( in my past life ), I always thought of the entire grey/silver color band as primers, ha !  Whichever you do will look great I'm sure.  I have not seen too many Continentals, but with the exception of a white, really rusty one with a black and white interior, they were all beautiful.  Good luck on finding the paint with the proper size pigments of metallics you want. The choices may be limited with the aerosols..  Thanks again for this wonderful journey you are taking us on....I have to say, it is my favorite one and the one I always come to first.   John

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Thanks Roger,Have to try the torch option

3 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

Thanks Dileep!

I'm surprised that your solder get brittle. I suppose you are using soft solder which is a alloy of tin. This type of solder is not very strong unless the soldered surface is consequent. For delicate work, like I did on the hood ornament, you could read that my tentative to soft solder the outer ring ended with a disaster. For that, silver soldering is more suitable, but requires a torch as the melting temperature is about 650-680°C. The inconvenient is that the brass get softer (it is annealed) and can compromise the strength of a part. As you see, a medal has always 2 sides.

Thanks Roger,have to try the torch option when I again get back to a scale model.Write now I am trying designing with solidworks software,tends to be little easier to change wrong design:)

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After getting 8 post notices within a couple of hours I suspected their might be some color being applied! Looking spectacular and I can't wait to see it in full color! Speaking of color, those look awesome in Desert Rose!

800px-Continental_Mark_II_rear.jpg

Edited by Murco (see edit history)
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Roger, I wouldn't normally comment on something as personal as someone's choice of colour, but you asked for opinions... :P

 

My opinion is that the best colour would be one that is correct for the age of car. A sharp, modern colour on an old car looks wrong unless the owner is deliberately making a custom car, in which case the wheels and interior also need to look custom.

 

Both colours you've presented look like beautiful shades but to my eyes they look like modern colours. Are they?

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Roger,

I like the dark gray / red leather combination better, but I'm certain that which ever way you decide to go, the results will be stunning. It has certainly been a long journey up to this point - thrilling and inspiring for us as observers, challenging and involved for you as the artist.  All of us have enjoyed the privilege of going along for the ride.

 

Dave Reeves

New York, USA

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Roger, I thought I would throw my two pennies in on the color choices.  I think the blue would look nice, but a shade not as dark as what you have on the trunk.  I think a lighter shade of blue would look great.  Not a pastel type, but something more toned down.  Something not as intense.  The whole project is looking great!  

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Roger,

Silicons hit on something that I was pondering after seeing several Continentals show up at our car club meeting here in Rancho Santa Fe, CA.  One was a light blue with white interior, another was black with a black interior (both original and very well preserved).  The third was a copper metallic with a copper/white interior.  VERY STRIKING. IT was completely restored and was perfect.  I do not know if it (the copper) was an original color selection for the mid 50's offered to the buyer. The owner of the car had stepped away and I did not get a chance to ask him.   I had a 1965 Lincoln Continental 2 dr. Sedan back in the 70's that was a trade in at the local Lincoln/Mercury dealership.  It had 38,000 miles on it and I paid $800.00 for the car.  It was in perfect condition with the paint starting to fade. But after I buffed it out, it looked great.  It was a copper/bronze metallic color with the same color scheme for the interior. No contrast so I got tired of it and sold it. Used cars were very inexpensive back then.  If I had just hung onto a few of the cars that I owned...................................................:-(   

 

With  a  1:12 scale, the color is a tough choice.    I keep harking back to the time that I was in Jr. High.  Our local doctor had purchased the Continental for his "Sunday"  car for the family outings.  It was a light, sky blue with a white interior.  Extremely striking.  Even though it was 10 years old, it still had more class going down the road that any newer car.  It was timeless in design and sophistication.  The light sky blue stuck in my memory to this day. 

 

Roger,  I do not know if it is a tough decision for you.  One that you have been pondering for quite some time, after spending 7-8 years on the car, paint it the color that YOU like.

 

What ever color you choose, I am sure that you will get it right.  It is nice of you to ask our opinions for feed back.  I had one heck of a time picking the color for my Spider till I saw a car zzooooming by me on the freeway.  I sped up and saw the Toyota badge on the trunk.  Right then and there, I drove to the dealership and pinned down the color.  Nautical Metallic Blue.  Not an original FIAT color but striking.  Now I have the car painted and with a bone colored leather interior, it is very nice.

 

This car is a class act 1:1 or 1:12th scale.  It must be very hard for you to select the color and the feedback may help.  If I had to opt for a color, I would go with the grey but not so dark. Maybe a little lighter shade of Metallic Grey. And coupled with the burgundy leather interior.  STRIKING !  I hope that you are able to find the metalic paint with a smaller metal flake.  Do you have Testors or Tamaya available?  I am sure that they are available in the hobby stores.  With the hobby paint, I am sure that they have the metallic with the smaller flake in the paint for a more scale application.   And a local auto paint store can take the paint and put it in an aerosol "shaker" can for you.  That way, you have the comfort level of using a spray can.  Just a thought.

 

It is exciting to know that you are at this stage.  The completion is just around the corner.........................................WOW.

 

Randy  

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Roger,

I agree with the others that whatever color you choose it will be spectacular.  You can add me as a fan of the color blue.

I'm sure you've see it, but for those who haven't, the September 2016 issue of Hemmings Classic Car featured the creator of the Mark II, William Clay Ford's original 1956.  His was painted a special one-off color called "Honolulu Blue", which is remarkably similar to the sample color you provided. For the creator of the incredible one-off model to paint it a one-off factory color made for the creator of the actual car might be worth considering.

 

Conti 1.JPG

Conti 2.JPG

Conti 3.JPG

Conti 4.JPG

Edited by Buick 59 (see edit history)
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On ‎04‎.‎04‎.‎2017 at 7:33 PM, John Byrd said:

Roger, you just keep on amazing us !  As with some others, I am preferring the blue paint.  I am a bit biased though, because as a painter ( in my past life ), I always thought of the entire grey/silver color band as primers, ha !  Whichever you do will look great I'm sure.  I have not seen too many Continentals, but with the exception of a white, really rusty one with a black and white interior, they were all beautiful.  Good luck on finding the paint with the proper size pigments of metallics you want. The choices may be limited with the aerosols..  Thanks again for this wonderful journey you are taking us on....I have to say, it is my favorite one and the one I always come to first.   John

Interesting point of view about dark gray looking like primer! Anyway, the more I see dark gray cars on the road, the more I prefer blue! I'm sure I will find the right paint with smaller pigments.

Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)
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Thanks to Randy, Buick59 for the pages from Classic cars (I dont have this publication) and John as well as the other ones for their comments. There are too much, I cannot follow properly with the answers! I also have to say that I was not expecting so many comments with just 2 paint samples. May I ad that I do appreciate those comments?

To John: I will have a little more than $ 25.00; maybe $75 to 100.00. Primer must be added, plus the various rattle cans I will try; anyway,not $20'000.00!

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At this period of the year, I have other duties. However, I had the time to do something for the Mark II, see the picture. The interst to drink from time to time a good wine is that the bottles are delivered with a wood box. I used that wood to do what you see here. Of course those parts are just rough; what are they in your opinion?

 

 

DSC06585.JPG

Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...

Roger must be busy.  

 

I am awaiting the transformation of the wood parts into the bench seats for the Continental.  I am wondering how he is going to get the little "springs" to fit in the frames.  :-)   Of course, there will not be any such items.  It will be interesting to see how  he attaches the leather and if there is an under-lament before the leather is attached.  Roger, are you going to sew into the leather the patterns of the seats like the 1:1 Continental?  Or how are you going to simulate the stitching?  We are awaiting your magic.

 

Randy  

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Yes Randy, I'm busy! Back from 2 1/2 weeks of vacation (I did the wood work there) and this week is "sold": seminar and tomorrow, I'm getting a '58 Hydramatic transmission (scale 1:1) for repair.

Nothing was done recently on the model; I hope next week will be more useful!

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