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Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12


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If the switch for the seat was completed some time ago, I neglected to finish the master switch for the windows. Finally, I had the courage to continue. Every switch had to be adjusted and the function checked with one motor before I went to the next one. I had shorts and was surprise in such moments how much energy is contained in just one 1.5V battery: one of both lead I held with the fingers on the battery went hot in such situation, I could not held it for long, which is not the purpose after all. All the shorts or lack of contact were solved; the switch will go to the finished parts. The last check will be done when all motors are connected to the switch. I may still have bad surprises…

15 wires are soldered to that assembly; two wires for the ground will be attached to the door and one + wire will be soldered with the other one; 10 wires will have to exit the door to distribute the current to the seat, the other 3 windows and the RH vent window.

Note the finger prints on the chromed escutcheon!

 

 

855 Master switch.JPG

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I have made an O-ring out of the right length of the right diameter "rod", end-joined with cyanoacrylate. It was for the swimming pool sand filter top, so a different scale to yours, but the same idea could work for you too?

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11 hours ago, Spinneyhill said:

I have made an O-ring out of the right length of the right diameter "rod", end-joined with cyanoacrylate. It was for the swimming pool sand filter top, so a different scale to yours, but the same idea could work for you too?

I'm not sure, for two reasons: in you application, I believe that the O-ring is compressed. When used as a belt, the O-ring is under light traction. As the section is not very large, it may not withstand that traction for a long time.

The second reason: somebody told me that the cyanoacrylate glue is unstable with the time. I don't know if this is true. The letters and word "Oldsmobile" and "Toronado" were attached to the model's body with that product; they are still on it after 10 years. However, I have to say that I don't wash that car very often!

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Roger, your work amazes me! "ve been following this thread from the beginning and it has inspired me to try a project. I am building a 1/6 scale replica of the engine from my '36 Dodge but it in no way can measure up to your level of detail. Even in 1/6 scale i find it extremely difficult to make small parts so detailed.Th model is made from mostly wood, plastic and some brass but I have no specialty power tools to aid in construction. Here a few early photos of the project. It's almost completed now after 2 years. Thanks for posting this thread and I really look forward to seeing the completed model!

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Your Dodge engine is good looking! Don't think that my first model was so detailed...Without a minimum of equipment, some parts are difficult to shape. A lathe is required with the possibility to use it as a milling machine; the Unimat3 is for that suitable, unfortunately, no more available since years, except on eBay from time to time.

1:6 is really a large scale...Too large for my lathe, I never could do the wheels!

Do you intend to go further, I means with a frame or more accessories like the air cleaner?

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8 hours ago, jpage said:

Roger, your work amazes me! "ve been following this thread from the beginning and it has inspired me to try a project. I am building a 1/6 scale replica of the engine from my '36 Dodge but it in no way can measure up to your level of detail. Even in 1/6 scale i find it extremely difficult to make small parts so detailed.Th model is made from mostly wood, plastic and some brass but I have no specialty power tools to aid in construction. Here a few early photos of the project. It's almost completed now after 2 years. Thanks for posting this thread and I really look forward to seeing the completed model!

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Can you put a dollar bill with it so we can see the size difference? That looks fantastic.

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I have it completed except for the spark plugs and plug wires. It has all the accessories on it. I'll have to see if I can get some good closeup pics. my camera doesn't take very good photos up close!. The model is 8 1/2 inches long. The head measures 3 3/4 in. long and 1 3/16 wide.

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33 minutes ago, jpage said:

I have it completed except for the spark plugs and plug wires. It has all the accessories on it. I'll have to see if I can get some good closeup pics. my camera doesn't take very good photos up close!. The model is 8 1/2 inches long. The head measures 3 3/4 in. long and 1 3/16 wide.

 

What is the story behind the project? That is really neat. Thanks for sharing.

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I have been building models since I was a kid, usually all antique cars and trucks which sparked my interest in old cars. I haven't done any real modeling for many years because when I was in my teens my dad told me that I was too old for toys like this so I stopped. I love detailed things, so when I saw Roger's thread and the skill and attention to detail he puts into everything, I decided to try something in a large scale just to see if I could do it. I'm not an engineer or very skilled for that matter but it's always a challenge to figure out how to fashion an item out of scraps that you might have lying around. Most everything, like the starter, gen., oil filter, manifolds block and oil pan are wood with plastic details. i did make some things from brass. Metal always gives a sharper detail  and a more realistic look as with wood you have to contend with grain and shrinkage. I'm going to try to post some more pics today if I can. And, Roger, please don't think I'm trying to hijack your thread, just wanted you to know that your work is inspiring. I thought this model would be easy since I had all the parts here for measurement, now I'm thinking about what to do next. Might try an antique tractor. You would think that something this small would be cheap to build but those tiny bolts are expensive! I can just imagine what Roger has invested in those models he builds!

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Here's more photos of the engine. Sorry for the poor resolution on some. If you look real closely you can see one spark plug lying on the head. I don't know if it can be seen but there is a copper mesh filter behind the screen in the air filter.

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Edited by jpage (see edit history)
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Again, nice engine jpage! About the costs: compared to a restoration from a real car, almost negligible...

 

Many things happened the last few days: as it was rather warm outside, I decided to make the negative form for the headliner. Halas, when I was ready to do it, there was a nasty wind! Imagine small patched from fiberglass on a table with gusty winds…they don’t stay on the table for a long time! As everything was prepared, I decided to do the job inside. To clear the air, I opened enough windows when the job was done.

I will have to rework this mold because for the moment it is like a modern headliner glued on a substrate. I will have to add the specific shape from a headliner when they still were attached to the roof with wires.

When the polyester was curing, I began to plan the CONTINENTAL letters for the hood and the trunk. Front and rear letters are the same, with the exception of the middle “N” at the hood because the letter has to follow the hood’s shape.

Fortunately for me, the shape of the letters is rather simple compared to the word “Studebaker” or the “TORONADO” letters; the easy design of the letters was partly offset by their small dimensions: 1mm height, 1.5mm in length, except the “I” of course. I began with the easy ones: the “C”. After three tries, I had it. Fortunately, I had a milling tool which is 0.2mm thick; I did almost all the work with that tool. I had mixed feelings about the “A” and its hole: I drilled 2 holes of 0.3mm next to another; I succeed on both letters without breaking the bit. The “N” was mostly done with a file; I had to do 8 letters to have 6 decent ones.

Once plated with nickel, the letters will be glued on the paint with transparent silicone.

Sorry for the dirt around the letters; I noticed that after the picture was done…

856 CONTINENTAL letters.JPG

Edited by Roger Zimmermann
Replaced "B" with "A": no B in Continental! (see edit history)
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This is for JPage,

Going with 1:6 Scale allows you to get into more detail as the engine is larger.  There is a guy, Louis Chenot  who absolutely blew us all away with his 1:6 scale Duesenberg  Phaeton.  His engine RAN and I have attached the clip on U Tube showing it running.  I live in Carlsbad but when he was here demonstrating the engine at the Joe Martin's  "Craftsmanship Museum",  I had the flu and was not able to attend.  

First Run of Lou Chenot's 1/6 scale Duesenberg engine - YouTube          

 

You can also see his car on You tube too.  

 

He completed the Duesenberg and won the "Craftsmanship of the Decade" award from the Joe Martin foundation.  Joe Martin has passed but his company, Sherline tools, is still in business.  With no heirs, he left a good part of it in Trust for perpetuity. The Museum houses a beautiful array of hand made model engines, airplanes, trains, boats, steam engines, etc., etc.  If you are ever in So Cal, don't miss this museum.  It is a living museum with craftsmen working in the back showing visitors the operation of their tooling (Lathes, milling machines, etc. etc. and they are actively working on different projects and models.  Worth a visit.   
 

Louis has "lent" his Duesenberg to the museum and it is on display.  He is now working on a 1:6 scale Garwood with a Liberty engine.  Don't know if the engine will be running but knowing him, it probably will.  

 

So, J Page, (didn't get your name) is this engine going into a 1:6 scale automobile or truck?  Or are you just doing the engine/transmission?  The quality of your replication is spot on.   Kudos to you.  

 

For Roger, we just got the pictures back on the Forum.  They were upgrading or ?  and all of the pictures were not attached and we could not see the progress for over a week.  But they are back now and now we can see what you have been up to and what JPage was talking about as we could not see what he had attached.

 

Looking forward to the next post.

 

Randy

 

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Roger,

 

Cutting the lettering for the Continental is spot on.  IF you were to enlarge them, they would match the 1:1 car.  I do not envy you finishing them (final filing, sanding and polishing) for the plating company.  I was working on a very minute turnbuckle (1:50 scale for a Military Flat Car with a WW II Sherman Tank as the payload.  When I get it done, I will send you a pic).  I spent 1 hour working on the tiny hooks to secure the load and spent an additional hour and a half on my hands and knees looking for the parts that I dropped (several times)   :-(    I am going to put down a white sheet next time I do something like this.  Irritating.   

 

We are all awaiting to see how the headliner will come out.  Nice to know that the weather is starting to change back to Spring time.  Not there yet but coming.   We here in San Diego almost washed away.  More rain in Southern California that has been here since the early 90's.   We broke rainfall records and we are not done with the rainy season yet.  So much for living in a "desert".  

 

Always in Awe and respect for your craft,

Randy

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As the weather was almost like spring time, I could do the positive shape for the headliner. As the polyester has to cure one or two days, I began the emblems located on the front fenders. Each part is done with 5 separate elements silver soldered.

Here is a picture from the real part, followed by my interpretation. I’m just wondering how I will polish that…

 

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857 emblems.JPG

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6 hours ago, jpage said:

Roger, I just don't know how you do it!

Well, with some imagination, a fine milling tool and file and patience. To tell the truth, I was not sure if those small parts would look like a gob of brass and silver solder...

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Roger,

Under the magnifying glass (the forum watchers) of the public, you are producing magic.  Like at a magic show, we, the audience, are always awaiting the next trick that you pull out of your hat.  Those are TINY parts.  Finishing the emblems for the plating company will be fun !  They are so minute, if there are any flaws, they will not be noticeable, only to you.  One day, there will not be any more parts to make or parts to prep and paint.  This story is an excellent diversion from our daily lives.  We check in here and get our "dose" of Roger's Magic.  You wow us all.

 

Randy

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It does not happen a lot, but this time I don’t know how further: thanks to the mild weather we had recently, I could “cast” the headliner shell. After trimming, it goes into the roof, but the fitting is not perfect as I removed here and there too much material.

Initially, I had the idea to use off-white satin to represent the headliner. That material is very thin; probably by applying cement on the shell, the glue will go through the satin (more from it later). To avoid the problem, I imagined cutting the shell into 7 segments at the lines which are figuring the suspending wires and glue the material from behind. I anticipated following problems: the alignment of each panel may not match the next panel exactly; the satin must be cemented on the roof at the sides, not at the shell. That cemented satin on the side could be pushed back when I will attach the side and front brass molding, ruining the headliner. OK, I could try and in case of catastrophic failure redo another shell. Misshapen are sometimes there to find a better solution; I prefer however to avoid waste.

The next solution would be to install definitively the shell into the roof and cement the satin directly on it. I tried this morning to spray some “Display mount” from 3M; as expected, I had the fingers full of that stuff which go through a thin cloth very easily.

The other solution I see is the use thin leather for the headliner. Not quite correct, but who is looking at the headliner from a scale model?

Maybe one of my readers has a solution I could use…

 

 

858 Headliner shell.JPG

859 Shell into the roof.JPG

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Roger,

The problem(s) with the 3M aerosol product is that you have to have the fabric positioned EXACTLY before you press it into the headliner. Once it touches the glue, it is nigh on impossible to move it and the glue is almost instant. plus you have overspray that has to be cleaned up. I may have a solution to your adhesive.  The product is called Aleene's Original Tacky Glue.  It is all purpose and when applied in a thin coat it shouldn't come through the satin or fabric. It is used by crafts people gluing fabric and most everything.  Since the California Air Resources Board has banned most products that have lacquers or spirits the industries have had to come up with water based products. Aleene's is a water based product and clean up is easy. Also it is not aerosol. It comes in a bottle or a tube and you can experiment with the fabric to see how it will work.  If you local craft shops there do not have it, let me know.   I will pick up a bottle and ship it to you.  I use this product for a lot of my needs.  It is  used here extensively in the crafts hobbies.  It is made by Duncan Enterprises  here in Fresno California.  I was first turned onto this product in my scale model railroad hobby.  The guys used it to attach the track to the road bed without using nails (on N scale).  The good thing about the glue is that if you want to remove the item or cloth, it will release without tearing up what you are gluing it to.  It is water based and it should not damage your poly roof liner.  With this glue, it dries clear and you have the ability to move or "position" the fabric before the glue dries.  Doing a small area at a time will allow you to get good results.  Email me  and let me know.  I will swing by the crafts store tomorrow (The 11th) and pick up a bottle or tube.

 

Hopefully, this  will solve your problem.

 

Randy

 

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16 hours ago, Frank Tate said:

Roger, have you thought about flocking it?  I don't know how thick the adhesive and the flocking fibers are, but I don't think it is that thick.  A quick search found me this site:  https://www.craftflocking.com/Buy_Flocking.php

Well, Frank, this is another possibility I never thought about. Thanks for the idea! From what I saw, rather easy to apply; it requires however that the shell must have a nice finish which is not the case right now.

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I expected to have difficulties with the hood emblem: no deception here, I had some! First, I did a major mistake: I took 2 bits of brass, did a groove in the middle, and silver soldered them to have the star basis. All went well until I began with the outer square. If I silver soldered them, the whole star could come apart as the soldering was not 100%. I decided to soft solder it, knowing that the joint is very weak, especially with such small dimensions. I did a wider square, did slots until I could solder the assembly to the star. The principle is shown on the first and second picture (but this is the second emblem); then, the excess metal has to be eliminated until the appropriate thickness is obtained. All went well until one part went away because the joint was effectively too weak. I tried to solder it and, during that process, 2 other parts said good bye! At that moment, I knew that I can do another star, this time with solid material. A new square was then silver soldered and the same process of eliminating the excess brass was performed like the first try. This time all went well; I could then soft solder the base of the emblem.

As you can see on the last picture, the finished emblem on the right is at 90% OK: during the soft soldering, I missed the opportunity to maybe correct a little bit the outside square shape. Fortunately, when put on the hood, this misshapen is barely visible. Doing a third emblem is no guarantee that it will be better, therefore, I let it that way. The part on the left will stay that way as I had too many hours into it to throw it away.

 

 

860 hood emblem.JPG

861 hood emblem.JPG

862 hood emblem.JPG

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Some days ago, I bought some cloth. Not satin, but cotton. This afternoon, I experimented with that cloth with the adhesive can I found. Unfortunately, the can is too old; what came out is liquid and lump (if this is the correct word). Anyway, the first attempt is not too bad; I have to improve the lines and buy a new can. The cloth is not snow white; it should be ok with either white/blue trim or white/red trim.

I still hesitate between a blue metallic or anthracite outside color. Years ago, our stores had hundreds of spray cans; now maybe 20 or 30 generic paint are exposed. It will be a problem to find the right (for me) color.

863 tentative.JPG

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Always exciting to see the progress, I even started at the beginning again the other week and gave my self a refresher. As I read through, I see all of the things you've made and I think to my self about the things that amaze me the most, before I know it I've picked everything.

 

Great work as always Roger

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Roger,

The hood ornament looks very good.  Only your eyes will see a flaw.  Once you get the part filed and final sanding and plated, the emblem will look like a million on the hood.

 

The headliner really looks authentic  Like you say, will anybody really be looking up at the headliner once the roof is attached?  I cannot wait to see the car with the exterior painted and peering into the engine bay, looking at  all the detailing.  Very heady stuff Roger.  Excellent ! !

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Another point of no return: after finishing the shell for the headliner, I decided that it was time to solder the roof to the body. I hope that I will not find the hard way that it was too early, but now the door is open to think at the body finishing.

 

 

864 Soldered roof.JPG

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