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Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12


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Some time ago, a member from the Mark II forum discovered an error at the heater core: when I was doing them, I picked the wrong picture on the net and I did 2 identical parts. The result was that the inlet/outlet tubes were on the top at the LH heater and at the bottom at the RH heater core. In fact, the RH part is a mirror image of the other one. The correction was quickly done: I just heated the spot with the solder iron and turned both "tubes" by 180°. Unfortunately, the holes in the boy are not equally spaced, therefore I had to enlarge the holes from the heater core. When the model will be assembled, nobody will see it, but I was not pleased. How can I correct that without doing the part again? Well, a thin "cover" over the flange would do the trick.

I have to confess that when I drilled the holes in the body, both sides were done exactly the same because I used a template. When I drilled the flanges from the heater cores, I remembered that I had a template, but did not found it in my mess. The holes were drilled as well as I could, but I had to correct almost every holes. As I found later that template, it was the opportunity to correct both sided. I'm feeling much better now!

 

The next task was to add the small handle at the inner base of the LH rear lamp bezel. This handle is needed to swing the rear lamp to open fuel tank. As I was at that lamp, it was time to add the spring to keep it closed. I had to make 2 attachment points for the spring, did a spring with a 0.1 mm wire (0.004") and installed it. The most difficult part was to makes both "eyes" at each and of the spring and to insert them into the attachment points, but it works fine!

 

835 modified heater cores.JPG

836 detail added to the lamp.JPG

837 Return spring added.JPG

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9 hours ago, keiser31 said:

I suppose you are going to put a factory-looking gas cap on that pipe, too?

Thanks John S. and keiser31. Yes, there will be a gas cap on that pipe. I'm not that far because the fuel pipe will be the plug for the voltage needed to operate light and window motors. There will be no in-car battery.

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Who said that a Mark II is an easy car? As I'm preparing another batch of parts to be chromed, I wanted to include the vent window frames. Wait a minute: they are not ready! A small detail is missing: an art gutter on top of it. I'm surprised that nobody from the Mark II community asks about that missing detail...

By looking how to do that, I saw that it has to be very precise: it must not rub at the drip rail above it while opening the door and the vent window must not touch it either. At first I wanted to skip it but it's a part rather unique so I did try. Now, which thickness? 0.1 or 0.2mm?

As the clearance has to be tight, I opted for 0.1mm (0.004"). I could even silver solder the flange, allowing a little bit more heat when soft soldering the assembly to the main frame.

The following pictures are showing that gutter. Fortunately, the chrome on those parts is very thin!

 

839 vent frame detail.JPG

838 Vent window frame.JPG

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After doing the same for the other vent window frame, I assembled those 2 parts to the chrome tree. This morning, I went to the plating company with the tree and the grille which will be nickel plated. The boss promised me that the parts will be ready in one week.

 

840 third batch chrome.JPG

841 third batch back side.JPG

842 grille to be nickeled.JPG

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Just for keiser31: I did a fuel cap. Why?

Since the third batch of parts to be chromed is at the outside company, I don't know with what I could continue. I still have the ceiling to do before the roof is soldered to the body, but it's too cold outside to deal with polyester. Inside, I have war with my better half! Therefore, I'm hunting for the small details which have to be done anyway!

While I was at the details, I colored the tail lenses with transparent paint. When I was doing those lenses, I had a problem with what looking like a crack where the plastic was sharply bent. With the paint, that crack is no more apparent...It was maybe an optical illusion, who knows...

 On the real car the back-up lenses are not clear on the entire surface. The rear portion has a different inner surface, hiding the construction of the rear lamp. I tried to reproduce it with white paint; maybe media blast would be more effective but I don't want to go with that experience.

843 fuel cap.JPG

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7 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

I do my best to be near the reality.

 

Next, you'll tell us that you put gas in it & had the motor running. ;)  LOL

 

Still AMAZED ...EVERY ... time I visit this thread.

 

 

Cort, www.oldcarsstronghearts.com
pig&cowValves.paceMaker * 1979 CC to 2003 MGM + 81mc

"Wake me up inside" | Evanescence | 'Bring Me To Life'

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The last batch of plated parts left me with some disappointment; I had a mixed feeling when I brought the new batch to be plated. This morning, I went to the plating company as the parts were ready. What a good surprise! The grille, now nickel plated is excellent as well as the other chromed parts. For once I'm enthusiastic how the parts are looking. Most probably, this time the copper/chrome was a tad thicker than previously; if I'm right that coat is about 0.01mm (0.0004"). Now, I will put aside the accessories I'm doing for the engine and begin to assemble the bumpers and other parts. That's the very nice part of that hobby!

 

845 third batch chromed.JPG

844 finished grille.JPG

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I think its worth noting that on page one of this odyssey you write:

"February 3, 2010 was the beginning of this mad project: the construction of a Continental Mark II, scale 1:12, from scratch."

So yesterday was the 7 year anniversary, not only for you the builder, but for all of us as spectators...thank you for bringing us along on this fabulous ride!

Edited by Buick 59 (see edit history)
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I'd say that anniversary solidifies this as the top, ultimate, no-other-thread-comes close EPIC THREAD!

 

 

Cort, www.oldcarsstronghearts.com
pig&cowValves.paceMaker * 1979 CC to 2003 MGM + 81mc

"See what else your old heart can take" | Rosanne Cash | '7 Year Ache'

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Thanks ScarredKnightfan! I just hope that you will not get ennemies from other thread's writers!

 

Today, I have some good news to report and one not so good: last Friday, I got back the chrome batch and I was very satisfied. You may imagine that I began to assemble the grille and bumpers. I could not believe what I saw at the lower front bumper: the chrome was peeling on two surfaces! OK, this is not the end of the world, but annoying as I will have to let dechrome the lower part, polish it and give it back. Why that misshapen? I just don’t know. Maybe I will get an explanation when I go to the plating company. Depending of your screen, you can see one of the problem as a small point under the parking lamp at the left of the picture.

Fortunately, the grille and rear bumper are nice. By looking at the grille picture, you may notice a light yellow hue; this is caused by the nickel plating. Disturbing? a little bit, but only by looking at specific positions. Anyway, it’s better than no chrome at all on the grille.

 

As the major elements are no more assembled, it’s a good opportunity to add details to the engine and transmission. Those details are time consuming; when I had a large element ready, I skipped the details to go to another large assembly. Now, I have to do them…I began with the speedometer adapter at the transmission; I added also the oil filler tube, taking care that it does not touch the frame.

 

It was then the turn for the heater tubes, 2 each side. The upper ones (hot water) are attached to the heads and the lower ones at the water pump, allowing the coolant to return to the engine. The RH lower tube was critical because it is very near from the upper suspension lever. Fortunately, I had just enough space.

 

An interesting addition is the 4 heat shields just under the exhaust manifolds. On the real car, 4 spacers per side are added on top of the heat shields; the spacer’s role is still not completely explained. As I don’t have long enough bolts, I had to do mini spacers!

 

A last addition is the oil pressure sender, next to the oil filter. The next additions will be the various vacuum lines at the intake manifold, carb and distributor.

846 Front bumper.JPG

847 rear bumper.JPG

848 Grille.JPG

849 Heater tubes.JPG

850 Oil filler tube.JPG

851 Heater tubes.JPG

852 Heater tubes.JPG

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On February 10, 2017 at 3:08 AM, Roger Zimmermann said:

Thanks ScarredKnightfan! I just hope that you will not get ennemies from other thread's writers!

 

LOL!  You are welcome ... & I ain't worried........ ;)

 

This is always 1 of the 1st batch of threads I open ... because each time ... is just so cool to see the updates since my last visit!

 

 

Cort, www.oldcarsstronghearts.com
pig&cowValves.paceMaker * 1979 CC to 2003 MGM + 81mc

"Get the word out" | Collective Soul | 'Better Now'

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Another update for ScarredKnightfan!

The various lines for vacuum and fuel have been added on the engine. One is still to be done: the line going from the fuel/vacuum pump, located on the driver side, to the vacuum distribution, located on the passenger side. I will have to look at a real car to get more info.

853 Vacuum tubes.JPG

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2 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

Another update for ScarredKnightfan!

The various lines for vacuum and fuel have been added on the engine. One is still to be done: the line going from the fuel/vacuum pump, located on the driver side, to the vacuum distribution, located on the passenger side. I will have to look at a real car to get more info.

853 Vacuum tubes.JPG

 

WOW!! Can you put a dollar bill in the picture to show people the size?? That would be fantastic.m I'll supply the dollar if needed. LOL

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To Dave:

I always forget to put something familiar when doing pictures, sorry! As I had no small change, I'm putting a $ 20.00 bill, souvenir of my past visits to the US...

 

To keiser31: yes that the way they go. I'm adding a picture from a Lincoln engine (the differences are at the exhaust manifolds and valve covers) showing more or less the routing.

Thanks for looking and the comments!

 

DSC06523.JPG

Engine rear2.JPG

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The air cleaner and cap from the steering pump are secured with a chromed star nut. I did them this week; each nut is an assembly of 3 parts silver soldered. I added also the arm at the air cleaner intake tube which open or close the warm/cold air for the induction. As the arm and tube are both brass, the arm, inside the elbow, is rather hard to see. It’s not very large either…

854 Further details.JPG

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On February 13, 2017 at 11:31 AM, Roger Zimmermann said:

Another update for ScarredKnightfan!

 

HA, nice!

I'm so glad you posted the pic with the bill ... that sure helps have a better idea of the size & scale.  Thank you!!!!

 

 

Cort, www.oldcarsstronghearts.com
pig&cowValves.paceMaker * 1979 CC to 2003 MGM + 81mc

"Happiness is something we create" | Sugarland | 'Something More'

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Oh the complexity of 12 scale !   The best laid plans of mice and men............  But we have confidence in your abilities.  When you get the windshield wiper assemblies figured out, that will be a major accomplishment.  Looking back, the window switches and motors were a "snap" in comparison. It seems that every time that you attack a problem, two more rise to get in the way of your progress.  And people wonder why it takes years to get such a model/masterpiece completed.  Lots of "trial and error" before you can get on to the next item.  

 

When a 1:1 car is engineered at the factory, there is a team of designers, draftsmen, mock up groups, just to get the parts to come together.  And here you are doing this by yourself.  For any who wonder why this is monumental, just get any simple model kit of a car and assemble it.  Even though the parts are all there, for fit and finish, it still takes a trained eye and skill to put those kits together to make them look like the picture on the box. 

 

Now step back and try to do that same model from scratch...............................you will quickly get the picture what Roger is up against.  And his model is in COMPLETE detail of the real car.  Unlike any kit in a box.  Even the Pocher kits don't come close.  We are in awe.

 

Randy

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Roger, 

 

I noticed the drive belt on one of the engine pulleys.  I was going to ask what material you are using to make the "V" belts on the engine?   Is that a very  small "O Ring"  that you are using?   Not that any one would know as they will be only visible from atop.  But knowing you, you probably have thought this through and have come up with a solution that is applicable for the engine drive belts.  

 

I hope that you are having a "mild" winter and that Spring will be coming soon.  As soon as the weather is nice, we are looking forward to seeing the polyester work on the roof.  It is just amazing how you are attending to ALL the details as some are not even seen, being hidden by fender liners, bulkheads, kick panels, etc., etc.  But YOU know that the details are there, and so do we (Who have been following this build for the last 7 years).  

 

The postings are a highlight when I go to your site.  Always looking for what you have done next.  The bumpers and the grill look amazing.  It will be nice to see them assembled and installed on the car at the appropriate time.  

 

This may be a silly question but do you keep track of the hours spent working on the Continental?  Do you have a log that you keep?  After building the Toronado and the Avanti, I was just wondering if you logged the actual time spent at the bench.

 

Phenomenal work as always.

 

Randy 

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Thanks for the comments, especially about the large US quarter! It's not nice to let know to everybody that I'm cheating!

To Randy: yes, I'm using an O ring, section 0.7mm (0.028") but it's diameter is too short: I can go over two pulleys, it should go over the four: water pump, A/C compressor, generator and crankshaft, plus another belt  going from the crankshaft to the steering pump. I will have to search if larger O ring are existing with the same section; a slightly larger section like 1 mm will also fit. As everything must be removed for painting, it's still a bit too early for the search; however, I see that the engine will be painted and I still don't have the belts!

I don't keep track of the hours spent. The sole statistic I'm keeping track is the number of years!

The headliner is the last element which must be prepared before the roof will be soldered to the body. I'm waiting too that springtime is coming! The last few days were rather mild (10-12°C), still too low for outside polyester work.

Right now, I'm assembling the master switch from the driver's door. Up to now, only 2 switches are functioning the way they should. The next one is creating a short: I know it by getting burnt at one finger when I'm holding both leads to the 1.5V battery. It's incredible how much energy is stored in a small battery!

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Roger.
I do not know if this will help. I needed a toothed belt for the blower on my 1/8th Hot Rod. I first measured the length I needed and then cast a round disk in resin that was slightly wider than the belt. When the disk was still soft I used one of the the toothed pullys I made to inbed the teeth profile in the resin. I made sure to make the recess deeper than I needed. I then turned the outside of the disk to give me the correct thickness belt. It would be easier to do a V belt as you could just use a form tool to put the V into a brass disk. 

 

Once the resin was hard I used black silicon to over fill the void. It was then a simple job to wrap a bit of thin brass strip tightly around the 'mold' and secure it. After a couple of days, to make sure the silicon had gone off, I remove the strip and a 1/8th scale formed tooth belt just peeled out. The was no flash as the brass strip was tight to the OD of the disk. I did leave a small gap where the strip met to allow excess to come out, but it was easy to trim off and position in a place on the car where the mark could not be seen (at the bottom of the crank pully).

 

All belts have some sort of adjuster on them, and I have no doubt yours work. This does allow for some inaccuracy on length.

Hope this helps.

 

Gerry

 

20170220_095958_zps1omu7uuw.jpg

 

20170220_095950_zpsh6mmpvrd.jpg

 

PA210041_zpsa2cc250d.jpg

 

I have just found an old belt that was a failure, but the pics show the tooth form.

 

20170220_102346_zpschfy0da1.jpg

 

20170220_102325_zpsuozbbygc.jpg

Edited by Fadt
add pics of found part (see edit history)
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Gerry, thank you for this method! Sure, I could it that way, the V belts are easier to do that your flat/teethed one. And yes, there is an adjuster at the steering pump and at the generator. If no handy O rings are available, I will do them that way. Even solutions can be found in a forum usually not dealing with scale models. Thanks again!

Just a question: what kind of silicone did you used? A product like what is used in a paste form to attach windows to the body or make engine gaskets ? The silicone rubber I'm using for the tires is not suitable for this application: it can tear very easily and is liquid.

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Just used black silicon from a tube thats available from the local car parts place which is like thick glue, and YES it is easy to tear once cured. You could. of course embed something in it like fishing line, I suppose.

 

Then again you could use an O Ring and flatted one side, but....its not a V belt is it.:D

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