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Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12


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The headliner will not be like a real car, some cloth suspended with wires and nailed at the specific places. It will have a polyester base with the correct headliner’s shape and on which some fabric will be glued. I began the task by putting some Plastiline and then shaping the front and side moldings. The plan was to screw the side moldings at the roof’s lips, I’m not sure if this method will be practical. As I doubt that I will ever remove the side moldings for “service”, they could also be glued in place once the model is painted.

I did also the inside mirror support; the tiny bit of leather is only there to have the 3 holes to attach the support at the correct location, this is not an indication of the future trim shade.

I will now fabricate both elements which are joining the front and side moldings; they are also the base for the inside sunshades.

773 roof moldings.JPG

774 mirror support.JPG

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As usual, all those small details are time consuming; it’s the same for the sunshade supports. When they were ready to install on the inner roof moldings, I saw that it was an illusion to keep the 3 elements independent. Therefore, I soft soldered them together; it was then easier to drill the holes for the attaching screws (0.6mm). The next problem was: how to attach the safest way that assembly to the roof? I developed various methods till I realized that the assembly has to go vertically to the roof because there are indentations (still to be done) to clear the A pillars. I came back with the initial idea: attach the whole thing with 4 screws at the side of the roof, like the real car (a small difference: there are more screws on the real vehicle).

As the Plastiline was on the way to drill the four holes, I removed it. I will have to add it again when I’m ready to do the headliner.

One image is showing a sunshade support from a real car; mines are not the exact reduction but near.

775 roof moldings.JPG

776 sunshade support.JPG

Sunshade support2.JPG

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As always, very nice detail and incredible work.

 

It's amazing to see all these small details as they are being made, I'm not sure that once the entire car is assembled some of them may never be noticed again just because of the overwhelming amount of work that will be front and center.

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As the inside mirror support was done, I took the opportunity to do the mirror. No big deal but this time I added a small detail: the mirror is adjustable. In fact, I had difficulties to find a system to attach the mirror to the tilting device which is very large by Ford (compared to GM mirrors) and further, to attach the whole to the support. In addition, I remember that I broke the already chromed inside mirror shaft during the final assembly of the Toronado. To avoid this, I did that shaft with mild steed and, when I was at it, I imagine that I could add a ball to let adjust the mirror. The ball is squeezed to the mirror with just one screw which is behind the “glass”. Once that “glass” (a flat bit of chromed brass) will be secured into the mirror’s base with silicone, it will not be possible to disassemble the mirror.   

Mirror inside3.JPG

777 inside mirror.JPG

778 tilted.JPG

779 tilted.JPG

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Roger,

 

Just to keep this in perspective, how long did it take you to complete the rear view mirror?  So much thought goes into a part, sketching and/or drawing the part before you start it then it is down to the actual working at the bench to fabricate the part.  Now multiply this by ALL the parts that you are fabricating for the model.  And this is how weeks turn into months and months turn into years. Plus you have a life to live in addition to your project, eh?  Dedication and not wavering from the goal is commendable and we all admire you for your brilliant craftsmanship. We all salute you for this great creation.  In some ways, I will be sad to see it finished.  Then there will be no more chapters or posts to look forward to, No more problems to overcome.  Unless...................................you decide to do  another model?   (just kidding)

 

Randy

 

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Hard to say...Maybe 3 days with the support. It may seems a long time, but I'm not always at the model...However, you see it right: at the end many years will be needed to get to the end!

Never say never, but frankly, I doubt that I will begin something similar when the Mark II is over. I'm getting lazy...

 

Up and down…Once some work at the roof and now something at the floor: the front seat. The frame is just a pale and approximate copy of the original because once the cushion is on, nobody will see it. On the other side, I had to do a frame to get the proper position in relation to the floor and a way to attach the seat to the tracks as well as the small axles for the front seat back. The electric motor on the floor is more or less correctly positioned; in contrary to all electrical seats, the motor will be attached to the floor and the movement will be with a bell crank. This eliminates a flexible wiring and simplify the installation.

780 Front seat frame.JPG

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With the seat’s frame done, the next step was the seat backs. On the Continental, the rear of the seat back is a structural part for the seat; the upholstery is just attached to it. On my Cadillacs from the same period, the back is just a panel attached to the seat structure with smell screws.

The challenge here was to let tilt the seat backs with a very short pin at the center. I was afraid that the seat would disengage when tilting it, but it’s not the case. The garnish panel at the seat frame is acting as a retainer for the seat backs; on the real car spring clips are used at the outer and inner links. I had to improvise a feasible solution.

The next step is to install the electric motor.

 

781 with seat back.JPG

782 Please take place.JPG

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Very cool, it just occurred to me that there are a bunch of electric motors in there for windows and the seat, what will you be doing as far as proving power and being able to activate the motors.

Will it have a handheld controller with switches and a battery and a connector to be able to plug into the car ?

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The switches will be the ones from the car. Yes, they will be small and a lot of wiring will go out of the LH door, I should manage that. The battery will be outside the car and plugged into it to have current. The idea is to plug the battery (or batteries) into the fuel tube, but I don't know yet if there is enough space. If not, I will plug it ...somewhere else.1.5 V is enough to power the motors; headlamps may require higher voltage. I don't know yet.

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Roger,

With how creative you do everything else, I am surprised you don't use small button cells concealed in a perfect looking reproduction battery in the original battery location. I realize how crazy that sounds, but it would not have surprised me to see you do it. Still impressed with all of your work. I keep thinking I have seen your most amazing work and you keep coming up with different ways to impress me more.

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12 hours ago, Oldsfan said:

I was looking at that picture of the wiring inside the door, and it occurred to me, that at your scale, it must be like having garden hoses coiled up in there...

You are right! Don't forget that the wires you see now are not the definitive ones. On the other hand, with the exception of the driver's door which about 10 or 12 wires are going through the "A" pillar, there is space enough to have heavy wires.

10 hours ago, MCHinson said:

Roger,

With how creative you do everything else, I am surprised you don't use small button cells concealed in a perfect looking reproduction battery in the original battery location. I realize how crazy that sounds, but it would not have surprised me to see you do it.

Thanks Matthew!

Those small button cells don't have the capacity to run "large" electric motors. Further, when the hood is in place, it will be almost impossible to remove the battery because it's installed on the firewall. Then once finished, the model will be behind glass and only "used" from time to time. Imagine the mess if such a cell is leaking...

4 hours ago, Laughing Coyote said:

One question.  How do you you keep taps from breaking when your threading holes that small? I know when a tap breaks it's a real pain to get the broken pieces out.

Oh, Martin, it happens from time to time, usually when the wall is thick ! Experience and feeling are needed to be safe. The holes with a diameter of .8 mm are routine, and the ones with .5 mm are always a risk.

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As I expected, the installation of the motor was easy. I added movement stops at the motor mount; refined also the seat backs as I found errors. The stroke of the seat is proportional somewhat longer than on the real car and its movement is real smooth. If only the windows would be the same, but anyway I’m overall satisfied.

The seats are now finished; the remaining parts will be done with polyester to simulate the upholstery; eventually, the plastic will be covered with leather.

 

As I recently bought new spring material, I will redo the springs for the rear suspension as it’s now way too stiff. I will have to redo the front springs too, those are too weak!

 

783 forwards.JPG

784 backwards.JPG

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Roger, I continue to be in awe of your engineering talents.  You will have to take a couple of short videos of the windows going up and down.  With only pictures, no one will believe that they actually work.

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Thanks John! We have planed to buy a new camera this year, this will then be possible to do that. Or, with the cell phone from Christine it could be a possibility. I'll have to do that the next few weeks because, when the rear suspension will be done, the whole model will be put in pieces: the next step is the construction of the inner side panels, as the way it is now, the model is heavy and cumbersome to work on the inside.

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In my mind ... we all are in awe of Roger's work & the pics ... I can only imagine how much more cooler the videos will be showing the moving-working parts ... oh ... my ... goodness mercy me! :)

 

 

Cort > www.oldcarsstronghearts.com
pigValve.paceMaker.cowValve | 1979 Caprice Classic (needs new owner)

"It was like a lighted match had been tossed into my soul" __ Trisha Yearwood __ 'The Song Remembers When'

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Roger,

With summer upon us, I got busy with my business.  I have not been on the site to see the progress for some time.  It is amazing to pop back on AACA Forum to see what you have done.  As always, I am, like the other admirers, awestruck as to how you over come problems and solve them. Who would have thought of a "moveable electric seat" in this  scale?  Electric windows, seat, headlights, tail lights.  Are there going to be brake lights, turn signals, courtesy lights, trunk lights, ? ? ? Wouldn't put it past you to have those items added to the model.  

 

Bravo, Roger.

 

Randy  

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Thanks Barry and Randy!

It could be done, but I don't see the necessity to add them: there will be no brake light, turn signal, courtesy light and trunk light. Just parking lamps, headlamps and taillights activated be the light switch at the dash.

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2 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

It could be done, but I don't see the necessity to add them: there will be no brake light, turn signal, courtesy light and trunk light. Just parking lamps, headlamps and taillights activated be the light switch at the dash.

 

Necessity? That's ironic considering the lengths you have gone to during this build. :-) Are working windows and seats a necessity? No, but damn they are beyond amazing! There are no words that properly convey how impressed I am with EVERY detail, seen or unseen in this build which is a true masterpiece! Make no mistake, this is a true masterpiece of the highest magnitude!!

 

Courtesy lights would be handy while on display, the car in subdued lighting with the interior lit up would be spectacular and with today's super small LEDs, it could be done.

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"Well, nothing is written in stone (if that's the right expression). The idea of light into the interior with led lamps is someting to think about it."

 

I know you don't have much to do so why not add one more thing? (I'm just kidding you!) 

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Roger,

Looking at the seat movement, I am impressed that it moves as much as it does.  That is quite the feature!  And it is a copy of the real seat !  I can just imagine your mind conjuring up features to add to the Continental.  It will be a real revelation when we see the seat "cushions" installed in the car.  I am sure that you will have the correct patterns in them for authenticity.  We anxiously await your next installment on the Continental.

 

Tomorrow, the 4th of July, the United States celebrates her 240th year of the "Great Experiment" in democracy and freedom.  We salute our founding fathers for daring to defy the tyranny of King George.  God Bless the USA and at the same time God Bless Switzerland for being one of the "Jewels" of our small planet. The Vatican is not foolish.  The Swiss Guard keeps the Pope safe.  The world keeps correct time due to the diligence of the Swiss companies who make the most amazing time pieces.  We all see how it trickles down to the Swiss craftsman in many endeavours, you being one of the shining examples of "Craftsmen Extraordinaire".  Again, Roger, we are amazed at your genius.

Randy

 

P.S.  My Fiat Spider is in the body shop getting a new "lease on life".  New floor pans, firewall section, and all the dings and dents attended to. I will get the shell back from the shop this month.  THEN...........I get to put it all back together.  Thank goodness that I have an original Fiat Factory parts book with all the drawings showing where every fastener, doo dad and thing-a-ma-jig goes.  (I was fortunate enough to have a friend who loaned me his book for me to duplicate.)  Was there a parts book from Ford for the Continental?  Or did you have to rely on photographs and measurements only? 

 

Randy      

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Thanks for the message Randy! There is a parts book and service manual for the Mark II (I have them) but the details are not that great. Most details are photographied and measured; fortunately, I have access to such a car at 10 miles from home.

 

I began with the new rear springs before the summer break. Once the paper work was expedited at my return, I could continue with the rear springs; they are now done with 8 leaves; some leaves were done with a .3 mm thick stainless steel, some were done with the same material but .4 mm thick. The rear of the car is too high for the moment; when all remaining parts will be added, the high will be more or less correct.

As you may see, the nuts at the “U” bolts are not correct; the “U” bolts themselves are too long. All this will be corrected prior the final assembly.

 

 

786 rear spring.JPG

785 rear springs.JPG

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Mr Z, I have just today noticed that we can "like" a post.  Well, I do, but that is not enough, as your work is so unbelievable and beautiful, so I thought I should reply once more about how much I enjoy and admire your work, pictures, and explanations !  Thank you sir, your posts make a bright morning find !

 

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