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Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12


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Thanks John!

My pictures came probably at the right time to the right people. If the crowd at this fare will appreciate it is another matter because they are not car people. I'm wondering how many will know what a '56 Continental Mark II is! I will certainly get a feed-back...

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Roger,

 

How far away is the show?  I hope that the case (with the model) comes back and is not lost ! ! !   So many years and so much work to travel away from you !  I am sure that they will take good care of it.  Is it being displayed in Switzerland or ? ?  God speed in getting it back to your work bench.  

 

We all are awaiting the next chapter in the construction.  It is amazing how the rear motors are nestled below the rear seat.  Maybe you can add a "lumbar" adjustment to the rear seat that will be actuated by the motor.  ( he he)  Really, I would not put it past you to put in Power seats and a power trunk release if the car called for it.  Not much that you cannot do.  You have proven to us avid followers that tasks presented to you are met with the most skilled and able answers.  

 

Now that it is warming up, are you driving your 1:1 cars ?  Time to limber them up from their winter "rest".   

 

Take care 

 

Randy

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The model is no more at home, but at the Baselworld http://www.baselworld.com/fr-CH/Show.aspx a fair of worldwide reputation for watches and jewellery. Why? When the front grille was ready, I sent pictures to the company I bought the silver solder applied with a dispenser, Hilderbrand & Co (www.hilderbrand.ch) to show them that I was very satisfied with that product. They had the idea to show the model with other parts as a demonstration what can be done with silver solder. Usually, they are showing incomplete watches and jewellery along to their various products; maybe this model will increase their customer’s base…The model should be back at the end of next week.

 

The attached picture is showing how the model and parts were packed.

Hi Roger!!

I'm a huge fan of your work and have been following this build thread for some time, I just haven't posted as to minimize the non-build posts. You never cease to amaze me with your skills and I have learned much while following it. May I ask, which of the Hilderbrand solders do you use?

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To Randy:

The show is at 60 miles from home, in Switzerland. I'm going there on Sunday as Christine and me are invited to the show by the silver solder producer. This is the sole contribution I will get, with the case. Sure, I hope that all will be coming back in the same shape that it was for 2 days...Anyway, the model is insured for about $ 50'000.00 but, frankly, I prefer to have the model back!

There was no electric trunk lid release, but there was a 4-way electric front seat. Mine will be only 2-way.

It's still too cold to drive my old cars; anyway, the license plates are back to the government for the winter season; I'm taking them back usually at the end of April (During the time the license plates are back to the governement, road taxes and liability insurance are stopped, reducing the costs).

 

To Murco:

Glad you could learn something by looking at this post! The silver solder I have is the type CF 56 H722 E-2. It's a 8 gramms cartridge, 65% metal, 650°C working temperature.

I have also rods from Castolin, type 1802.

Feel free to ask whatever you would like to know!

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On March 14, 2016 at 1:53 AM, Roger Zimmermann said:

Yes, ScarredKnighfan, I see your "like"!

If I'm understanding well, you would like to copy some pictures to show then on other sites? As my pictures are not protected, do it!

Ha ... good, glad you do!

& yes, you understand correctly.  I might also want to snag some of your explanations here & quote you as well, if that is OK with you.  Your work is just so very good & fascinating!

 

Cort > www.oldcarsstronghearts.com
pigValve.paceMaker.cowValve | 79 CC to 1995 Mercury Grand Marquis?!
"The sun is on my side and takes me for a ride" __ Natasha Bedingfield __ 'Pocket Full Of Sunshine'

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13 minutes ago, Paulie9fingers said:

Is it just me or is anyone else not seeing any of the pictures ?

I can see the ones Roger posted of the car on display but nothing else.

You apparently missed the discussion about the forum software upgreade in the General Forum. The new forum software will require a few days for the database to be rebuilt. Signatures and photos and some other content should be back in the near future. If anything still seems to be missing in a few day let Peter Gariepy know and he will work on any issues at that time.

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8 minutes ago, MCHinson said:

You apparently missed the discussion about the forum software upgreade in the General Forum. The new forum software will require a few days for the database to be rebuilt. Signatures and photos and some other content should be back in the near future. If anything still seems to be missing in a few day let Peter Gariepy know and he will work on any issues at that time.

Thank you

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Is that you Roger in the last picture with your back to the camera? Your model looks incredible "under glass" in the unfinished form that it is. Only insured for 50,000? I've heard of a bloke trying to sell finished Pochers for that, and yours being a one off scratch built beauty I reckon you could double that for sure. If you have a record of the hours you have invested multiply those by $25-$30 and that will get you close to the true value, less materials of course. 

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Quite fitting that it would be displayed amongst jewelry!   It seems like just the other day that you made that first tire and changed my expectations for what was possible at that scale.  You're still changing those expectations! 

 

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Well, Jeff, the model was not exhibited among jewellery: at the Baselworld, there are 3 main buildings: halle 1, 2 and, logically, 3. Watches and jewellery are exhibited in the halle 1; tool and machines to produce what is at the building 1 is exhibited in the halle 2. Precious stones or gems are in the halle 3. Rich and famous are gravitating in the halle 1 and to some extension in the halle 3; the less glamorous building is the halle 2. The public in the 2 is also logically different. Anyway, the manager from the company who asked for the model was satisfied with it; the model, which created some interest, came back yesterday in the same shape as it went to Basel.

About your remark regarding the flying  time: to me it was maybe the day before yesterday when I began that project; indeed it's the 6th year now! Glad I still entertain you!

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  • 3 weeks later...

After a short vacation, the work resumed. When the model was at the Baselworld, I began with the door's trim in front of the arm rest. To those unfamiliar with the Mark II, I'm including a picture from the real thing. On the left of the second picture are both inserts for the ashtrays to be used by the rear passengers. The ash trays inserts are soldered to the frame; the screws at their bottom will be used to attach the elements to the door trim. At this scale clips are not very useful!

The window switches will be added later on the parts.

The next job? it will be the LH quarter window.

DSC06201.JPG

767 ash trays.JPG

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Roger,

 

Glad that you and Christine are back and the model returned in good order.  WOW.  You get to turn in your plates at the end of your driving season to cut registration expenses?  So progressive is Switzerland.  California is so greedy, they want their fees for the whole year, unless you put your car in "non Operating" status.  Then you pay like $16.00 to the state until you want to drive it  again.  If it is an old car (before 1975) you can just pay the registration and provide proof of insurance and you get your tag to put back on your plate and your new registration. IF it is newer, and it has passed the two year time for smog inspection, then you have to get your car smogged.  And that is usually between 60 and 95 dollars (US) And that is if there are no problems.  If it fails, you have to fix the problem and have it re inspected.  It's a racket and really doesn't clean up our air.  

 

The newer cars and this "gas a hol" has done that.  But not without a real problem for those of us with carburetor equipped cars.  That new blend of gas eats up the pot metal and seals in the carbs.  We have to get the carbs rebuilt with the kits that have the newer neoprene seals that can stand up to this crappy gas. Plus, we have to put in additives to stabilize the gas or it will go bad in short order.   I have had to go through all my carbureted vehicles (motorcycles and boats  included) and have the carbs rebuilt or replaced with new ones.  If you only have one or two, no big deal.  In my case, I have 14 vehicles.  :-(     I bet in Switzerland and your province, it is not nearly as expensive to operate an automobile as in California !  Enough of that rot.

 

I am glad that you had a good time at the show. Your Continental, even though it is in primer, is really striking.  Bet it turned heads when they got to your display.  The solder company surely should have given you an award for your car.  Maybe they gave you a lifetime supply of their product?  

 

As all who echo here, we await all the new items that you are making that goes on and into the Continental.  It will be a happy/sad day when it is finished.  On one hand, the car will be done and we will all marvel at it's beauty.  Those of us who have followed the thread from the beginning will know what lies under the skin and the  effort that you went through in getting  it there.  That will be a happy day.

 

But on the other hand, our days of opening the thread to see what new items that you have concocted for the particular task at hand will be at end.  And that will be bitter sweet.  

 

But until that day, we all marvel at your progress and the fine look of your Continental.  Tres Bien. Magnifique Roger.

 

Randy

 

 

 

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Yes, I'm giving the license plates back to cut expenses. Road taxes for the old cars are about $ 700.00 per year, liability is about the same. Therefore, when I know I will not drive from November to end of April, the discount is interesting. As my 3 Cadillacs have the status of oldtimer (cars must be 30 years or older and not modified and in good condition), I just have one set of license plates. Plus one set of plates for the car I'm driving year round. (costs are about the same for that 2011 DTS). And you find California expensive?

 

Was the construction of the LH quarter window easier? Well, not quite. Even if I had the other one to copy, it did not go without chosen words. All 4 windows go up and down, some with a more linear movement than others. I hope to improve that during the final assembly by adding a tad of friction in the window lifts. How? Don’t ask, I don’t know, but a solution will certainly come in due time.

As you can see from the pictures, the roof is still not yet installed. I’m just wondering if I can install all the inside devices with the roof on…For the moment, it’s so easy to work at the interior. On the other side, I managed to complete the Toronado and the Avanti with the roof on since the body was created. I was however some years younger!  

Some weeks ago, I received .5 mm thick Plexiglas for the side windows. I ordered it in England, paid in £; it was shipped from Germany to our vacation house in France!

768 wiring jam.JPG

769 windows up.JPG

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Thanks keiser31! If your body would be reduced at this scale, you would find many, many errors and strange things. Fortunately, without a magnifying glass, the result is decently looking!

 

Now that the windows are moving with an electric motor, I should begin with the inside trim. This requires that the model has to be disassembled for practical reasons. To retard this event, I'm doing parts which will be used much later. For example, the A/C outlet grilles. They are located into the ceiling; I'm adding a picture from a real one.

Those grilles are really small with the necessary details. These are not the best parts I did, but where they will be installed, the unequal distance between blades will hardly be noticed. And who will look at the ceiling? On the picture, a tool (to hold the blades during silver soldering) is on the left upper corner. A spare surround is on the right.

 

Next step? the ash trays for the rear passengers.

770 AC outlets.JPG

AC outlet.JPG

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On 3/18/2016 at 5:39 AM, Roger Zimmermann said:

To Murco:

Glad you could learn something by looking at this post! The silver solder I have is the type CF 56 H722 E-2. It's a 8 gramms cartridge, 65% metal, 650°C working temperature.

I have also rods from Castolin, type 1802.

Feel free to ask whatever you would like to know!

 

Thanks so much for the information! Based on your reply I got some of the Hildebrand solder, that's some pricey stuff but I already tried it on a joint and was thrilled with the result even using a resistance soldering machine!

Another question for you, how do you clean and seal the brass for painting?

Thanks again for letting us all "look over your shoulder" and answering my questions!

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Yes, Murco, the Hildebrand products are expensive. The solder paste I bought before from Castolin was, in relation to the quantity, less expensive, but after 2 years the product was  no more good.

Vinegar is a good product to remove unwanted residues from silver soldering; then I'm using sand paper to have a decent surface. On the present model, I'm using industrial 2-K primer; it the paint is thin enough, it's giving a nice surface.

If you are looking at some pictures (engine and frame for example), the primer I used is from Duplicolor. Easier to apply (no tool to clean after use), but not so resistant than the industrial product. Anyway, as this stage of the construction, the primer is more a protection against further tarnishing from the metal than a real first coat. When the time will come to paint the model, all primed surfaces will be sanded and a new coat will be applied.

Some modelers are using self-etching paint; it seems that this is not available in Switzerland or I don't know where to look for that product. 

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The next accessories are now done: the ash trays for the rear passengers. This is indeed a complex part; I did as well as I could. On the picture they are not nice looking, but don’t forget that in reality they are much smaller and some irregularities are not obvious.

The hinge is looking oversize; the “shaft” is .4mm in diameter; smaller is getting hard to manage. The shafts will be cut once the parts are chromed. No, the lighter is not functioning!

The next step? I don’t know yet…

771 rear ash trays.JPG

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Thanks Martin!

Bleach: on my everyday car, the ash tray is used for the house's keys! Doing small coins (without relief) would be very easy; however, the Mark II ash tray is not very suitable for that purpose as you can see from that picture: too deep and the aperture is very small.

Door trim6.JPG

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Roger, I continue to be amazed by your skill and attention to detail. I guess the house keys and coins are out of the question. ;)

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John, for that video, I have to buy a new camera. The one I have is 8 years old, was rather cheap and has too much limitation. I think this year I will have to break the bank and do an investment in a new camera.

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When the model was in Basel, I began the trim plates located at the door’s bottom. It was now the time to finish them. Again, I used the same technique as the one used for the dash for the middle of the molding: dots done with the lathe in his drilling set-up. The dots are done one by one at a distance of .2mm on 21 rows; each door molding has about 8400 dots! I’m especially happy: the door’s sills have the same pattern!

 

I will now look what I can do to the inner side of the roof.

 

772 lower trim.JPG

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