Roger Zimmermann

Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

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Thank you, I assumed you would pin/sleeve it in some manner, I was just curious 

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

Roger, what I love about your work is that you don't miss a trick. It is so real, what a treat. Thanks. John

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It took an awful long time to fabricate those 2 tiny bearing guiding the brake shafts. They are small and, even if I had not fat fingers, I had some difficulties to grab them for "machining". Then, to adjust them to have a free rotation of the shafts was a matter of trial and error. And, finally, by soldering the bearing (a simple tube with the proper dimensions) to the support, I had the bad surprise that everything was soldered: bearing, support and shaft!
On the second bearing, I thought that I had the perfect solution: I used a cleaned drill bit to simulate the shaft; the solder found its way to it and the drill bit was soldered to the bearing! I had to just heat it to let turn the drill bit with a plier and, during cooling, the solder joint was broken. Most probably the ideal position of the bearing was disturbed during the drill bit rescue because I had a binding situation which was solved by enlarging the inside diameter of the bearing.

114 brake shaft bearing.JPG

115 bake shafts.JPG

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Even with the problems you have had with this, the rear axle is looking very good. It is nice that you let us know the problems that happen.

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The rear axle is slowly coming to the end. There are still minor elements to add: the plug to drain the oil and the one to fill it up, plus 4 grease nipples at the brake shaft bearings.
The first picture is showing my method to position the axle shafts (crude but effective) and the recently done end cover.
 

116 axle shafts.JPG

117 with diff cover.JPG

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The drain and filling plugs were added (without picture). The big question was: and now, with what can I continue? During the winter, I prepared vaguely the pattern for the frame. It was the right time to finish it. Now, I can prepare two long brass bands; the flanges from the vertical "U" will be hammered on this thick pattern, allowing to make a RH and a LH frame rail.
I noticed recently that my bottle of gas for silver soldering is getting empty. The problem is that now stores (except for food) are closed as long that Cornora virus is active.

118 Frame pattern.JPG

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As the template for the frame rail was ready, it was time to bend some brass on it!
In fact, there were two options for the frame rails: trim a bit of brass the same shape as the drawing and silver or soft solder the upper and lower flanges or bend the flanges on that template. Each variant has its advantages and disadvantages. Silver soldering the flanges is creating a lot of distorsion; soft soldering the flanges is not very robust, but the rework is minimal.
The bending solution is requiring more finishing work because, as the flanges are hammered, they elongate and the rails were looking like a banana. Plus the marks done on the flanges by the hammer. I choose a brass 0.5mm thick (0.02"), therefore the material is thick enough to allow some filing to get at the end 0.4mm.
There are just 2 places I had to repair with silver soldering: at the rear, the lower flange has rather small radiuses and one had too much material (I had too cut a slice) and at the other curve, the brass sheared. I have to say that I expected more problems.

119 Frame rails.JPG

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They turned out very nice, it's always good to have less problems than expected.

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On 3/21/2020 at 10:49 AM, Roger Zimmermann said:

I noticed recently that my bottle of gas for silver soldering is getting empty. The problem is that now stores (except for food) are closed as long that Cornora virus is active.

Now we have a problem.  How are we all suppose to pass time at home watching your project unfold if you totally run out and everything stops?  Not good.  This is worse than running out of TP. :unsure:

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Don't worry Martin: we checked if the gas was available on line and it is, delivered by the post. However, there is another problem till at least mid-April: to assemble the various elements on the frame, I will use rivets as it was done at that time. There are between 150 and 200 rivets and the company selling them is for the moment closed!

The elements can be soft soldered to the main rails, the holes drilled and the rivets will come later. You will be able to follow the small progresses if I'm not distracted by something else! For example, I have a 1959 Cadillac transmission which must be overhauled. Right now, it's to cold in my shop for that (5°C), but maybe in 10 days it will be warmer. The transmission is already disassembled; I just have to clean the parts and do the assembly when I will get the ordered clutches and gaskets.

Ausgebaute Teile.JPG

Ausgebaute Teile1.JPG

Ausgebaute Teile2.JPG

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9 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

There are between 150 and 200 rivets and the company selling them is for the moment closed!

Come on Roger. Couldn't you have planned better for this epidemic? 

 

With all kidding aside, take care of yourself and stay well. We'll all be looking for any updates that you post to help keep us sane. ;)

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On ‎3‎/‎24‎/‎2020 at 8:55 PM, Laughing Coyote said:

 This is worse than running out of TP.

 

At least you can still use newspaper! The gas for silver soldering is a little more tricky to substitute. :)

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As my pattern was not thick enough, I had to skip the specific flange's shape at the rear. I silver soldered bands of brass to have the correct shape.
The main rails are not straight (seen from above) but has two bends, allowing the rear to be wider than the front. With that done, the main rails are done.

120 frame detail.JPG

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To continue with the frame, I choose the front supports of the front springs. To simplify, the RH and LH are not identical. I began with the easy one, the RH part. Easy? At first glance yes, but as all supports and brackets from that time, this was a casting. That tiny part is in fact constituted with 4 elements silver soldered. Some machining was required; the difficulty was to clamp the part which is far from regular or symmetrical. With some imagination I succeeded, without incident.
This support, which is also the base for the front bumper, is attached to the frame with 4 rivets; right now, it's soft soldered to the main rail. 2 rivets will be easy to do; they will go into the holes you can see. 2 rivets, one at the upper and the other at the lower flange will most probably be just for the show as riveting at the flanges at this scale is very difficult. This is the reason why all supports and brackets will be soft soldered to the rails.

122 Front spring attachment.JPG

123 Front spring attachment.JPG

124 Front spring attachment.JPG

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After the RH front spring attachment point was done, I began the LH one which is different. While I was drawing the "workshop sketch", I noticed that the casting is longer than the other side; therefore, I had to shorten the frame rail. I had previously done the holes for 2 rivets, they are now closed with soft solder as the correct ones are located about 2mm towards the rear.
The big question is: why this attachment point is so different that the other one? I'm not a connaisseur from the cars build in the thirties; I don't know if every car had that difference or only the expensive brands. By the way, the LaSalle models had that too.
Those who have such a car, please let the other people try to find the right answer! The solution will come in a couple of days.

125LH front spring att..JPG

126 LH front spring att..JPG

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My 1932 Dodge Brothers has a device on the driver's side front spring mount that supposedly dampened the steering.  As you can see in the photo, the drivers side looks totally different than the more conventional passenger side.  The leaf spring on the driver's side is also shorter than the other front spring.  This may be what's going on with your frame.

 

IMG_3766.thumb.JPG.89a013ac6a0f418a3c863156857daccb.JPG

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Exactly! In the Cadillac world, this arrangement was called "steering modulator", with following explanation: The steering modulator is designed to prevent shimmy and steering wheel whip. To accomplish this, the front shackle of the left front spring floats between two pairs of stiff coil springs. With this arrangement, the modulator springs absorb the road shocks which may otherwise be transmitted to the steering wheel.

If the system was functioning as intended is a question I cannot answer. This was eliminated when the independent front suspension was introduced. I'm adding a picture of the system used by Cadillac.

 

 

Avant gauche.JPG

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Sorry Roger, I had no idea as to why it was like that, didn't even have a guess.

 

Thanks to you and Taylormade for the explanation, I would have never even guessed it involved anything with the steering.

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