Roger Zimmermann

Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

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15 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

I don't know if Mike understood my second explanation better. 

 

Yes, I now understand Roger. I was thinking that 'axle' meant the centre part that drives or supports the wheel. I have always known the small part with the clip as a 'clevis pin'. I think that following your 'translated' descriptions is very good for me. It makes the English speaking reader concentrate on what they are reading, rather than just skipping through quickly reading the text. Keep up the excellent work and interesting posts.

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Thanks for the various comments! Yes, pictures, as we say, is better than 1000 words. Mike, as you are also doing some machining, you probably read my text more intensively than people who never put their hands on a lathe or milling machine. If the text would be more accurate, there would be no questions. On the other hand, to have questions means that people are interested and are trying to understand what's happening!

Another source of misinterpretation: I don't know in English the various elements from a lathe. I know them in French (or I should), but a direct translation is making no sense. Therefore, this add also to the difficulty. For tools, we are using specific words in French like "mèche" (drilling bit I suppose)or "fraises"; not strawberry but milling cutter. By using a "fraise" we "fraisons" but in English, you cannot say "I'm now milling cuttering this or that"! On the other hand, when we are using a "mèche", we don't "méchons" but we "perçons"!

This is just to explain my difficulties when I'm describing what I'm doing. Therefore, pictures are a good help!

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1 hour ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

Yes, pictures, as we say, is better than 1000 words

 

Roger, unfortunately, when I was at school in the UK, we did not learn any languages apart from English. At least the photos are in French, German, Italian, Chinese etc. Having dealt a lot of my working life with BMW 02 & CS cars of the 60's and 70's, I understand a bit of German, mainly technical. We also developed LPG conversion equipment for vehicles and imported equipment from Italy, Holland and Poland so I have a very small understanding of some Italian. French is definitely a foreign language to me! It might be fun to list the lathe parts out in English and then get Google to translate them into French and see what you think of the results? I sure some of the translations will make you giggle! Perhaps if I get 5-minites I will give it a go.

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When I was much, much younger, I had no interest to learn German, mainly because what you learn at the school is real German (in Switzerland) and what the people are speaking is Swiss German, a mix between slang, bad speaking , and what people speak in the Netherlands. Just not understandable! With the time, I had to adapt and reluctantly learn what "they" say. What I'm speaking is not German and not Swiss German, but it seems that people understand me!

With English, it was different: as a fan from US cars, I began to buy (I was maybe 17 or 18 years old) some US cars magazines. As you said, pictures are easy to translate and, in fact, I understood zero at the writing! In between I did improve a bit!

During my job at GM, I had once to check a French text which was translated from English probably. Horrible! Later, I had the same task for bulletins translated in French from German. I had to request the original text to understand! I also saw translated texts from a machine; not fun at all. It seems that those "machines" are improved; recently I had a text in French translated by a device from English. I was really impressed!

Now, about the terms from a lathe parts: if I just have the names from them, this will be meaningless until I have an associated picture for the proverbial "Ah Ah!" However, if you have the time for this small exercise, it could be fun!

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Roger I think your translation to English is actually very good, it is very seldom that I'm not sure of what you are describing. Knowing that you are also having to translate what you are doing to share your work just make the whole experience more interesting to me.

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Finally the first front brake is ready. From another forum, I had the question about the number of parts needed. Here is the detail from all was needed to complete that LH front brake; parts which were soft or silver soldered are included because they had to be cut, adjusted and soldered:

Brake shield: 18
Knuckle: 5
Actuating levers: 18
Brake shoes: 28
Fasteners, various: 15

The 4 cotter pins which will be added during the final assembly are not included.

The good news is that the brake is functioning well, with a minimal travel from the upper lever. I cannot say if both shoes are applied with the same strength to the drum!
Now, I can complete the RH front brake system.

90 Completed brake shield.JPG

91 Brakes ready.JPG

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I have just searched Rogers name on the internet and found this article about him that includes an interesting collage of photos. Not only do we on the AACA forum think his work is wonderful he is very well known and greatly respected in model making circles.

 

https://www.modelmotorcars.com/roger-zimmermann-switzerland-continental-mark-ii-scale-model/

 

Keep up the excellent work and posts Roger.

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Seeing the actual number of pieces involved makes the work even that much more amazing

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Roger, I spent almost twenty years working with men that had come to America from, mostly, central and eastern Europe. I was always amazed at how many spoke English to some greater or lesser amount. And, most were in a hurry to further their skills. While most retained a lot of their accent, I had nearly no trouble discussing, and working with them. I, sadly failed to learn but a little of German and a fair amount of that was cussing. My cursing vocabulary in the Polish language grew a lot as well. You, sir, are not hard to understand at all, and for the most part it's nice to hear a man using the terms and idiosyncratic structures of the 'old' languages. I see very few of my old coworkers nowadays- time has thinned us- but it was always a delight sharing a joke or a work challenge with them. 

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Pat, it's for most European people a necessity to speak another language. The smaller the country, the more vital it is! In a huge country like the US, you can drive thousands of miles north to south or east to west and you still have more or less the same language!

If I'm driving 65 miles north from home, I'm in Germany and Germans don't speak French! Dealing with US cars and parts and speaking only French would not be very productive!

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From my limited experience of meeting people, when visiting mainland Europe, it is the French and possibly a close second, the Germans, that are the most unlikely to speak English.

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Thanks Keith!

Now, both front brake assemblies are ready; the other one went quicker to finish as I had something to look at and some parts were already done. It would be tempting to do the rear brakes, but for that, the brake shield must be attached to something which is the rear axle. Therefore, I intend to go for the axle. Compared to the ones I already did, (of course, the one for the Toronado excepted as the car is FWD), the construction is different: for this car, the rear axle housing is constituted with 2 symmetrical stamped steel parts welded at the junction. I will try the same, but I need something to make a die to shape the parts. What I have in brass or wood is either too short or too thin; I'll have to look in my store room what I could use. However, it's too cold there now for that.
As there are other parts for the rear axle, I began with the end of the torque tube (the drive shaft is inside) and the mating part from the diff. If the end of the torque tube is a pure part done on the lathe, its different with the mating element: there are 10 bosses (it's the best word I found for that; is that correct?) for the 10 studs. How can I do that? I did first the tube with a flange on the lathe, noting that this tube is slightly conical.
Then I began to mill indentations; the main purpose of the indentations is to locate the bosses I will silver solder. As the tube with flange is conical, I had to attach it at the end of the torque tube with short screws.
The bosses were adjusted to the indentations and silver soldered when 2 were ready, until all 10 pieces were done. Now, I will have to drill the bosses for the studs.

93 milling indentations.JPG

94 2 bosses added.JPG

95 Ready.JPG

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By looking at the differential's pictures I have, something was obvious: the ends of the diff at the wheels are separate parts assembled by welding to the main body. It's not important to know, but I still wonder if the machining was dome before or after welding. For my needs, I choose the solution "before" because the solution "after" is not suitable with my tools.
Therefore, I machined 2 short tubes with the flange for the brake shield; this move will allow me to complete the rear brakes. The correct orientation of the brake shields on the main body will be easy then.
The attached picture is sowing at the top the inside of a drum; a steel bushing was inserted into the hub. On the real cars, this is a ball bearing.
On the left side, there is a view from the inside of a brake shield with a short tube emerging. On the real car, the wheel bearing is installed on that tube; most of the car weight is not carried by the axle shaft but by the differential tube. This arrangement was called 3/4 floating. Heavy trucks have the full floating type where the axle shafts have just the function of transmitting the power. On more recent cars with RWD, the axle shafts are supporting all the weight and transmitting the power.
On the right side, the brake shield is seen from outside; the emerging tube will be inserted into the diff and soft soldered.

96 Rear drums and shields.JPG

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5 hours ago, Roger Zimmermann said:

Thanks Paulie, from 3 forums, this is the sole answer!

 

I'm here to help 😉 LOL

 

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I promise to read your posts more carefully, and find the questions you ask, in future. I have now been severely reprimanded! :wacko:

 

I did translate the lathe parts into French using Google translate. I have just tried to find the file on my computer, it's somewhere in there, but at present I cannot find it! When I do I will post it. 

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Mike, nobody must answer my questions; at least, I was not killed because I used an inappropriate word!

I'm wondering what Google will say...

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I have managed to find the lathe file, English to French translation. This is just meant to be a bit of fun to see what you think of the translation. Roger, if you want me to remove the post after you have looked at it, please let me know and I will do so.

 

253297627_Partsofalathe.jpg.abab25921a0b4f3c0166e5533a0e2b43.jpg

 

Today we will learn about the parts of a lathe, its operation and working. The lathe is used in many metal forming industries. It is combination of many parts which work together to perform a desired function. A lathe is used to perform turning, chamfering, boring, facing, internal and external threading.

 

Aujourd'hui, nous allons en apprendre davantage sur les pièces d'un tour, son fonctionnement et son fonctionnement. Le tour est utilisé dans de nombreuses industries de formage des métaux. C'est une combinaison de nombreuses pièces qui fonctionnent ensemble pour effectuer une fonction souhaitée. Un tour est utilisé pour effectuer le tournage, le chanfreinage, l'alésage, le dressage, le filetage interne et externe.

 

There are many types of lathe, but each machine consists of some basic parts which are essential for its proper working. These parts are bed, tool post, chuck, head stock, tail stock, gear train, lead screw, carriage, cross slide, split nut, apron, chip pan, guide ways etc. These parts work together to obtain desire motion of tool and work piece so it can be machined.

 

Il existe de nombreux types de tours, mais chaque machine se compose de quelques pièces de base indispensables à son bon fonctionnement. Ces pièces sont le lit, le porte-outil, le mandrin, la tête, la queue, le train d'engrenages, la vis mère, le chariot, la glissière transversale, l'écrou fendu, le tablier, le porte-copeaux, les voies de guidage, etc. Ces pièces fonctionnent ensemble pour obtenir le mouvement souhaité de l'outil et pièce de travail afin qu'il puisse être usiné.

 

The lathe machine works on the basic principle that when the work piece is rotated at a constant speed and a tool is introduced into its rotation, it cuts the metal.

 

La machine de tour fonctionne sur le principe de base selon lequel lorsque la pièce à travailler tourne à une vitesse constante et qu'un outil est introduit dans sa rotation, elle coupe le metal.

 

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Thanks for the exercise! If the text is acceptable (but would need improvements here or there), the names of the basic parts is sometimes pure fantasy!

Just for the fun, here are the terms in French:

Bed = banc (bench in English)

Head stock = porte-outil (Google is correct!)

Chick = mandrin (Google is right again)

Head stock = poupée (doll in English!)

Tail stock = contre-poupée

Gear train = could be correct

lead screw = vis mère (correct)

Carriage = trainard (straggler in English!)

Cross slide = chariot transversal

Split nut = ?

Chip pan = bac à copeaux

As I'm not sure about apron and guide ways, I prefer to say nothing!

 

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The carriage was always known as the saddle when I was an apprentice.

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The rear brakes are actuated differently than the front ones. No cable, but a rotating shaft each side of the differential. At the left from the attached picture, you can see the actuating lever which is the same as for the front and a shaft "pinned" into the brake shield. That shaft has a lever; the connecting between that lever and the actuating one is still to be done. On the right, you can see the other drum and shield assembly with that shaft. The other end of the shaft will get a lever, of course, and it will be guided by a bracket and bearing attached to the differential body.

97 rear brakes.JPG

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To continue with the brakes, I had first to do the links transmitting the movement from the brake shaft and the actuator lever. The link is curved to clear the differential. I don't know how much space is between link and differential on the real cars; on the model, I will have to be careful by not spraying too much paint!

98 rear linkage.JPG

99 rear linkage.JPG

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