Roger Zimmermann

Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

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I am interested in how you worked out the 'offset' for the first spoke. This is how you indexed the rim to the hub and which hole you used to set the sequence for the rest of the spokes. I found it a little difficult the first time I did it.

Gerry

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

I hope I'm understanding your question correctly; if yes, my answer is following:

First, I'm installing the hub on the tool. Then, I'm searching which holes are a pair. When I have that, I'm doing a dot on the tool with a black marquer; in the first picture, the dot is more or less at 6 o'clock. Then, I'm assembling a pair of spokes (or 2 on the second picture) when the rim is added. When the first pair is installed, I can turn the rim to have the spokes centered; when they are at the place I like, I'm screwing the 3 screws at the outside rim's diameter, preventing it to turn.  After that,  I'm continuing with the first row, then the second, third and fourth. On the third picture, some future spokes are laying next to the tool. They must be bent and filed at the proper length.

By the way, I had an incident during the soldering of the second wheel: one spoke from the first row went out at the hub and I had some difficulties to reinsert it again. For this reason, I modified the tool by carving a groove where the spokes from the first row are emerging. The groove is allowing the spokes to go further into the hub to prevent the incident.

41 tool and hub.JPG

42 completed first row.JPG

43 completed 2. row.JPG

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Roger, I am truly amazed at the quality of your work. Always great to see and learn from your post.  Thanks, always,John

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Thanks. Did the same sort of thing with mine but had a lot more spokes to deal with and sometimes got it wrong and had to do it again. Second wheel was much easier

 

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You are welcome. Indeed I have "only" 40 spokes per wheel. With this wheel's design, once the first 2 spokes are set, it's no more possible to do an error.

Anyway, the second wheel went quicker, the third too!

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All the wheels are done. I still have to add the tire valve; the hole for it is done. On the picture, the back side from two wheels is shown.
During the work, my super tool "Dremel Stylus" went north (or south?): by grinding the spokes at the rear of one wheel, suddenly the machine went full speed, the rotating knob to modify the speed ad no effect and I could not stop the machine! I let it run and run until the battery was empty. I opened it later (I'm curious) and saw, at the speed regulator a black electronic component which has an obvious mark of overheating.
Could be it repaired? Maybe but not by me! I ordered another one.
What's next? I just don't know, there is so much to do!

44 Completed wheels.JPG

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Thanks Paulie!

 

The front axle is what I will do next. Usually, live front axles have a section like a H (turned at 90°), but, as it's a casting, the ends towards the wheels are thicker. I'm beginning that simple, but not so easy to do part, with a flat piece of brass. I will add the needed elements more or less like for a Christmas tree (good timing, isn't it?).

45 Front axle.JPG

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How to silver solder bushings at the end of the axle with  a hint of precision? I solved the problem by including tabs at each end of the axle and milling a groove into each bushing. The tabs are entering the groove without play, allowing to adjust the correct angle and position before silver soldering.
On the picture, both knuckle pins are ready to be put in service; they are at the right diameter to be without play in the bushings.
I can continue now by putting more "clothes" to the axle.

46 front axle end.JPG

47 bushings soldered.JPG

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This front axle may not be very exciting, but I must do it! I first trimmed the part to be able to silver solder the upper flange of the H (or I) and gave its almost final shape. Now, I'm preparing the parts which will be silver soldered on each side to have the correct thickness. If my explanation is obscure, the picture which will come soon will explain better.

48 trimmed axle.JPG

49 flange added.JPG

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Hi Roger, A question. With silver soldering can the flux go off? I don't do silver soldering very often. Last time I went to silver solder some brass parts I made the flux up into a paste and brushed it onto the cleaned parts that I wanted to silver solder. When I applied the heat, the solder just went into small balls and just would not flow. The flux had been stored in a plastic bag for probably two years, maybe longer. Mike

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Honestly, I never had a problem. Can it be that the flux you had was not a "good" one? When I review in my mind that last part I silver soldered, the flange for the front axle, I put a bit too much water and the flux was more like a liquid than a paste. I saw also the flux getting into balls but I assume that the brass was cleaned over the entire surface because the solder flowed as I expected. Next time I'm silver soldering parts, I will have the correct mix water/flux and try to remember how the flux is acting; I will report the results.

If Christine is here, she maybe can do a picture during the process.

The age of flux is not important: mine was previously stored into a paper bag for maybe 20 years or more! I have to say that I'm using one of the best product in the world: Castolin.

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Thank you Roger. I think you have 'hit the nail on the head', yes I am sure I put too much water in the flux, and was too impatient. If I remember correctly, it was a small job that somebody in the village wanted repaired, while they waited, I rushed and did not take my time to do the repair. I think, possibly I cleaned it up and then soft soldered it.

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To Mike: sorry, no picture when I silver soldered the parts below, but I did following to have a decent report to you: first, I mixed fresh flux to get a creamy solution. With the rod, I applied a generous coat of that flux. By heating the assembly, the flux tuned white like snow (although it's white when applied) and was boiling (this is the water). Then it more or less disappeared but in fact it went on almost all the surfaces. When the color of the joint to be silver soldered is getting almost the same color as the liquid solder, it means that the temperature is high enough and the tip of the rod can be put into the flame and will flowing into the joint. If the explanation is not enough, I will do some pictures with Christine; the best in my opinion is that you try yourself! Brass is not a necessity; 2 scrap of sheet metal can be used. Depending of what kind of alloy you are using, the sheet metal will turn dark red. My silver solder Castolin 1802 is about the lowest melting point on the market.

 

I can now show what I tried to explain recently. 4 filling pieces were more or less correctly adjusted to the existing axle. To help for the right location during the silver soldering, the pieces were riveted to the axle.

Now, I have to trim the assembly to the final shape; the second flange forming the H will be the last part which will be silver soldered. There will be several minor details which will be soft soldered as the are just for the fun.

Due to the intense heat needed, I'm glad that the bushings were mechanically stabilized.
 

50 More parts to add.JPG

51 silver soldered.JPG

52 thick end.JPG

Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)
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You are welcome, Mike!

Indeed, it's not easy to replicate cast parts. The only method is to divide  the assembly into simple elements and put them together. There will be a large amount of castings with this model!

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The front axle is almost ready. Since the last report, I silver soldered the lower flange, added a sole or shoe (maybe there is a better word) at the location for the front springs, trimmed the whole axle and lastly added the four tiny pieces at each end of the axle. Two will get the grease fitting; the other two are staying closed. These four parts took a long time: I had to drill them, put a pin, drill the axle to accept the pins. Without that, I would not be able to soft solder them at the right place or the one soldered would get misplaced while soldering the one the other side of the axle.
What is missing? Again 2 tiny parts which are acting as a steering stop. Only when the brake shield will be done I will see the exact location; they will be soldered with the same method as the four ones, with a pin.
What is coming next? Logically, the knuckles. Here we go! 

53 front axle ready.JPG

54 front axle ready.JPG

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Wow, Roger! You make even the most complex items so perfectly to scale. I have been amazed since I saw your very first post. That looks like a real cast axle.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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Roger, the axle just looks incredible. I agree with keiser31 & Laughing Coyote. If you did not know the photos were of a scale model, you would think it was a full size axle.

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