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Correct Faux wood paint for 41 Zephyr 3 Coupe


Tom Lubinski
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Hello,

I am in the final stage of restoration. One thing remains, the faux wood paint on the dash and window garnishes. The judging manual shows light gray with a taupe grain overprint. Using a straight grain stencil this looks like driftwood! Any suggestions or pics of a survivor would be greatly appreciated!

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If you search, this has been discussed before. I recently attacked a set and have attached pics of the dash. I would love to get my hands on a set of originals to document but have never seen any so I did this job off of some pictures, the owners memory, and the records that came with the woodgrain company when we got it. I will be able to give better feedback when I get the parts shipped back to the rightfull owner, but I keep deciding to put another coat of clear on the window garnish and not getting them out the door.

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Edited by gossp (see edit history)
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I had seen the image of the yellow grain. Does anyone know why some are gray and some are yellow? Was it a midyear switch, two graining locations, luck of a draw, two zypher factories???? I was working from these photo's taken before someone else had done a rag and brush job of the one pictured above.

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Here are photos of my 41 Sedans "Silver Birch" woodgraining, it was done in the late 70's before I owned the car. The yellow you see is from the florescent lights in the garage. The graining is silver gray in color without any yellowing. A possible cause for yellowing could be a coat of varnish over the graining to protect it.

I hope this helps.

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I am familiar with woodgrain getting a more yellow look out of a varnish, an old dash rub, or even just aged clearcoat, but those causes would never yield such a light color. Zephyr just had two colors show up on their vehicles in 41. I'd really love to find out how to know which is correct. A simple answer will exist. Did Zephyr have sub models, trim levels, or an upgraded interior package? How many Zephyr factories were there? On other fords I've seen grain and color variation based on which factory they were made at. On GM products I've seen stampings from the company that grain was outsourced to, creating a lot of variation if more than one grain company fed one assembly line. Packards would be grained in house and often whatever plate the guys pulled off the shelf that day got used that day. If they did half a car before five oclock and pulled another plate the next day... the front and back doors wouldn't match. My real reason for being so interested is that I want to know how to tell which is correct when I get sent a set with nothing left on them. It will eventually happen.

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Lincoln had 3 wood grain colors for for the 1941; Beech, Silver Birch and Mahogany. You could order the one you prefered for your car. You need the build sheet for your car from the Benson Research Center of the Henry Ford Museum to determine which one was ordered with the vehicle. If none is listed on the sheet, then it came with the standard grain which was Beech.

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Like I said, I knew there had to be an answer. I've done a lot of continentals in mahogany, and one zephyr in silver birch, but have never seen one of the beech examples except in photo's on this thread and one thread previous.

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