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Two ball bearing crankshafts


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Hi --- Could anyone shed some light on the soundness of early engines that used ball bearings for their crankshafts?

The Chalmers of around 1910-1912 or so used two ball bearings for their four cylinder engines. To me, ball bearings might be OK for light loads and VERY clean oil, but two main bearings in a big four is pretty scary.

Any thoughts? Chalmers was a rather popular car with a decent reputation, that I can determine.

--Scott

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Not only Chalmers but White as well, No problems as the Blocks were cast all in one piece making them shorter, The crankshafts were substantial, and the bearings are large. Driven my car many miles for years and never had a problem, wish they were all built like that.

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I agree!! I have a 30 hp White (1909) and a 40 hp (1911). The 40 hp car is 4 1/4 X 5 3/4 I belive, something like 340 inces. It is a terrific running car, runs great at 55 mph, and is very strong. I just replaced the original bearing, and they still looked great.

Adam

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hi,,,McCormack-Deering // Farmall,,1919--1930 used 2 ball bearing cranks,,and as I recall they guarenteed the cranks on that big one,,[[15-30] guarenteed for the life of the engine,,,at least Boston warehouse gave Geo Barker a new crank for his 1918 ,,15-30 back around 1948,,,the only one ive heard of failing,,,Lozier was also a ball b crank,,,Cheers,,Ben

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Hi,,,McCormack-Deering // Farmall,,1919--1930 used 2 ball bearing cranks,,and as I recall they guarenteed the cranks on that big one,,[[15-30] guarenteed for the life of the engine,,,at least Boston warehouse gave Geo Barker a new crank for his 1918 ,,15-30 back around 1948,,,the only one ive heard of failing,,,Lozier was also a ball b crank,,,Cheers,,Ben

The Farmall Regular, 1924- 1932, F-20 built from 1932- 1939 and F-30 1931-1939 used ball bearings until the end of production.

The McCormick-Deering 10- 20 was produced from 1923 until 1940. McCormick Deering 10-20

The McCormick 15-30 was produced from 1921- 1934. In 1929 the HP was increased to 22-36. But the tractor was always marketed as a 15-30.

There are also others in the group, like the W-30, and the T-20 TracTractor

I have a 1924 McCormick-Deering 15-30, and a 1924 McCormick-Deereing 10-20 in my collection. Both are un-restored but run and still have there original ball bearings. I can attest that this was a superior design that out lived many valves jobs, and piston, sleeve, and ring sets. I have also owned many of the others mentioned. I would not be concerend about a ball bearing design in an early automobile.

You are right Ben, They were guaranteed for life as it says in my owners manual for my 15-30.

The 1918 15-30 would have been an IHC Titan. http://s68.photobucket.com/albums/i8/dgwparfitt/images/IHCTitan15-30_Dorset02.jpg This earlier tractor was a heavy weight and had poured bearings. Dandy Dave!

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
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Sorry If I got the prod' years off,,When I ran these,,I had grandfathers oners book ,,but the prod' dates were not in there,,,The june 1927 Regular was the first regular sold out of Boston,,When I sold it,,it went w/ books,,AND the check and monthly bank statement and copy of estate inventory,w/serial no,,,,The big one was a model 30 [industrial],,,not a I-30,,,,this the big one only few produced w/ solid tyres,,3 speed,,I also had a I-20 ,and a T-20 crawler,,,ALL most excellant machines,,requiring little maintence in half a century,,The 30 would pull the 20" breaker plow,,sunk in a foot,,to clear land,,,Would pull good at around 350 rpm,,governed to 975rpm,,,ahh,,memories,,,Ben

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I own a 1910 Chalmers Detroit with two ball bearings on the crankshaft. I drove it 509 miles in four days on a recent tour at speeds of 45 to 50 mph without any trouble at all.

In 1909 and 1910 the Chalmers Detroit won 69 major automtive comptetions in the USA including the Indiana Cup and the Glidden Tour. No other car could even touch it. So two ball bearing must not be to bad. I would think that it depended more on journal diameter and metallurgy than anything else.

Paul

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Sorry If I got the prod' years off,,When I ran these,,I had grandfathers oners book ,,but the prod' dates were not in there,,,The june 1927 Regular was the first regular sold out of Boston,,When I sold it,,it went w/ books,,AND the check and monthly bank statement and copy of estate inventory,w/serial no,,,,The big one was a model 30 [industrial],,,not a I-30,,,,this the big one only few produced w/ solid tyres,,3 speed,,I also had a I-20 ,and a T-20 crawler,,,ALL most excellant machines,,requiring little maintence in half a century,,The 30 would pull the 20" breaker plow,,sunk in a foot,,to clear land,,,Would pull good at around 350 rpm,,governed to 975rpm,,,ahh,,memories,,,Ben

Ben, Nothing to be sorry about. I have also had several T-20's. One was used so little, it still had the original tin shield on the manifold. Another was very rough and only parts.

List of IHC's I parted with in almost 40 years of collecting.

1 regular

3 F- 20's

3 F-12's

1 O-12

1 parts 15-30

1 F-30

2 T-20's

1 TD9 trackloader

1 McCormick O-4

I have only retained the two early IHC models mentioned above in that long red power line. It gets to be a head ache trying to maintain all the runners after a time. One of the F-20s we had on the farm when I was a kid. It ran the silage blower with power to spare. Dandy Dave!

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
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I have a question,,What was the piston clearence on the iron pistons in the 15-30/22-36,,They would stick unless I put oil down the carburettor in the fall,,there was no wear,,and they were tight,,Cheers,,Ben [in Maine]

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