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Distributor


31DH

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Last summer I took my31 Dodge DH six-cylinder to a backyard mechanic and he took the distributor out and took it apart. The distributor is a Remi number 632K. There are two springs in there that are the same size, he suggested maybe that the springs should be two different sizes so when I got home I took my spare distributor apart also a number 632 K and both those springs are the same size. So then I took another distributor apart and it had to different springs one heavier than the other. The tag on this distributor is as follows Chry .Corp. Solar Spark Ignition model 1GZ 4008-1 serial ZO 49872 made in the USA by the electric auto company Toledo .

The diameter is 3 3/4 inches.

My question , is it necessary to have a two different sizes of springs(strength)? What is the ideal degrees advance for different RPMs.

Attached is a picture of the Chrysler distributor.

Glen

post-63263-143138160143_thumb.jpg

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Yes it`s normal for a distributor to be fitted with different size springs, they are designed to provide a given tension for each of the flyweights at any given rpm. The use of two different springs enhances the range of operation of the advance / retard mechanism.

You will struggle to find the figures for total advance and spring tensions today, that information in most cases has long disappeared and even if you did find it, to set up your distributor needs some sophisticated machinery which again has pretty much disappeared.

For average daily operations, as long as the flyweights are able to move out and be pulled back in by the springs you should be OK. Primarily those springs and flyweights will limit your total advance ( probably about 15 - 20 degrees ) at full throttle and unless you are running at those speeds it should`nt be a problem. Just keep a listening watch for pinging at highway speeds, if you encounter this you will need to retard the ignition to avoid it.

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My Delco book has these specs for your Distributor:

Start Advance @800 engine rpm, Deg 2.0

Maximum Advance @2500 engine rpm, Deg 18.0

This is for engine RPM, if on a distributor machine the above numbers are one-half. The book says the distributor turns at one half the engine speed.

Point setting .022

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Thanks for the infoThere are 10 teeth on the gear so that means 36°, so does that mean if you half that it would be 18°?

We put a timing light on the car and this is what we found out, it starts to advance at 1000 RPM, and stops advancing at 1600 RPM.

We then timed that motor according to the operator's manual which is as following. Bring number six piston within .032 advance on exhaust stroke, then rotate the distributor on number one cam until the points just start to open then tightened distributor. The results are 15° at idle and 28° at 1700 RPM and up. Then we took the car for a drive and it is running great!

What would be an ideal cruising RPM for Flathead six with Babbitt bearings?

Thanks again

Glen

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Thanks for the infoThere are 10 teeth on the gear so that means 36°, so does that mean if you half that it would be 18°?

We put a timing light on the car and this is what we found out, it starts to advance at 1000 RPM, and stops advancing at 1600 RPM.

We then timed that motor according to the operator's manual which is as following. Bring number six piston within .032 advance on exhaust stroke, then rotate the distributor on number one cam until the points just start to open then tightened distributor. The results are 15° at idle and 28° at 1700 RPM and up. Then we took the car for a drive and it is running great!

What would be an ideal cruising RPM for Flathead six with Babbitt bearings?

Thanks again

Glen

Why are you worried about the latter? Engines with poured babbitt bearings have been ran at rpms great enough to propel an automobile well over 100 mph. The gear set in the differential of your car will affect the rpms necessary to achieve a given driving speed but typically a car of the age of your car at 50 mph would probably result in rpms being something between 2350 and 2700 rpm in third gear and on flat level land, in the assumption it is capable of reaching speeds as high as 50 mph.

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