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1938 Roadmaster? ebay


Guest BJM

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I have placed bids on this car, if this is in fact an 81 series (no reason to doubt) the seller has emailed me and stated his lowest price he would accept is $2,000.00

What do you guys think? Is a 1938 Buick 81 Roadmaster in this project shape a $2,000 car?

With no disrespect to the Seybolds or other midwestern sellers, I think in the midwest this car would be "offered" for $4,000 to $7,000 even in this shape. Now, we never know if these larger 30's Buicks get sold for this amount but the sellers don't budge.

The seller said he has "double" that in it. No doubt.

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Lots to do, but the parts are worth more than $2K plus the shipping. I'm guessing he means wood grain when he describes the interior wood? I think the last Buick with wood body parts were the '37 big series's. It'll be a beautiful, luxurious, and imposing car when it's restored. It's definitely a Roadmaster trunkback, and almost certainly not a low production 81F (with the divider glass, which would be a real find), so it's safe to say it's an 81.

Good luck.

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Danny,

Actually those 9 bids represent someone bidding and not understanding the way a 'reserve' works on eBay. That person is submitting multiple increasing bids in an effort to meet the reserve, and since those bids are all coming from the same person, only the lowest bid will be displayed. The key as an occasional seller on eBay is never sell anything with a reserve. Make your opening required bid the minimum you will accept for an item (which for all practical purposes is a reserve). Some people like to think that setting a reserve with a very low opening bid encourages the bidding process and assists a seller in obtaining the minimum amount they will accept, but there is absolutely no evidence to support that outside of a live auction.

Thanks,

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Jake,

If that Roadmaster was here in Sydney, I reckon I would be jumping on it for sure.

How does one get 9 bids all the same on eBay??

Danny

Danny

I kept inching it up maybe $50 at a time so as not to get too far into the price and be committed. I set my high bid at $1600 and the seller says he needs $2000. I am leaving at $1600.

On ebay I could lose miserably as some interested parties wait...wait...wait to the last minute then bid in a frenzy or it could not move much more.

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Danny,

Actually those 9 bids represent someone bidding and not understanding the way a 'reserve' works on eBay. That person is submitting multiple increasing bids in an effort to meet the reserve, and since those bids are all coming from the same person, only the lowest bid will be displayed. The key as an occasional seller on eBay is never sell anything with a reserve. Make your opening required bid the minimum you will accept for an item (which for all practical purposes is a reserve). Some people like to think that setting a reserve with a very low opening bid encourages the bidding process and assists a seller in obtaining the minimum amount they will accept, but there is absolutely no evidence to support that outside of a live auction.

Thanks,

That's me working it up. (ociesgarden) and yes I was worried I would over commit on the vehicle. I somewhat disagree with your assessment that I don't know how reserve auctions work. My goal is to be high bidder, but below the reserve. My goal is to force other interested parties to fret in placing their bids. I have placed a max $1600 bid, but other then this forum, nobody else knows that. I have bid against a high bidder on reserve auctions and then wham all the sudden I am high bidder and placed a bid more then I wanted - I got caught up in the fun of it.

Danny - 99% of reserve auctions never meet reserve. A lot of sellers are out to win the lottery. This fellow is reasonable at $2,000 reserve.

I hate reserve auctions too but I think placing an actual desired price on ebay does discourage some bidders. Everybody wants a perceived bargain after all.

Some people bid for the fun of it, not necessarily to win. I have bid on several auctions, not won, and been approached by the sellers with "2nd chance offers"

Truth is I buy most of my cars off Craigs List not evilbay.

Edited by BJM (see edit history)
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Bryan,

I am restoring a 38-80C. I saw this 38-81 when it came up the other day. It looks like a fairly complete car. Gainsboro blue will look really nice on that car. I want you to know that parts for the large series 38's are getting very hard to find and that is the biggest difficulty you will have with this ebay car. I have been searching unsuccessfully for 5 years for several misc pieces for my 80C and the pieces would be for any Roadmaster so it's not Convertible specific.

$2000 sounds high to me based on the photos only. My father has an 81 they are great cars, but there is a lot of work needed on this vehicle. Depending on how far you take a restoration I think you'd have more in it than what it is worth even as a driver quality.

PM me if you want to know what I spent on chrome alone. I still have the stainless trim that needs to be freshened to show quality. Also it appears this car is missing all it's stainless belt moldings, those may be VERY DIFFICULT TO FIND. You may want to call Dave Tachney and see what he has for Roadmasters.

I hope this helps. If you do get it I look forward to seeing you bring this back to life!

Brian

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$2000 sounds high to me based on the photos only. My father has an 81 they are great cars, but there is a lot of work needed on this vehicle. Depending on how far you take a restoration I think you'd have more in it than what it is worth even as a driver quality.

I hope this helps. If you do get it I look forward to seeing you bring this back to life!

Brian

Helps a lot, thanks Brian.

On price, I get Hemmings and have been into Buicks for 20 plus years and these big series 30's art deco Buicks seem to get more then $2000.

There was (is) a frequent Minnesota seller of late 30's Buicks, Seybold and a couple of others. You call them and ask price and it's $4000 and up up up depending on if you get into 90 series or not.

I knew of a 90 series 1940 Limited out of Wisconsin a couple years back, running and driving but needing full restoration for $10,500 so 2K does not sound bad.

This seller says 95% complete and your observations about the stainless worries me.

1 day 22 hours left.

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Also that car does have wood in it. The body rails that mount to the frame are wood are some components of the seat backs etc. The large series had wood the small series cars did not.

BJM There is no doubt cars have sold for more than $2000 in worse shape. If you plan on keeping it and am not worried about getting your money back out of it $2000 is probably the cheapest you'll find this car in this condition.

Best of Luck! Keep us posted!

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What seems different to me is that it is the big series car, and no sidemounts.

Also, in the picture of the front fenders off the car, the fenders seem to have cut outs in the fender metal, in the area that would be below the headlight, that doesn't belong there. Not sure what that is, or if I am seeing it right.

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That car looks pretty decent.

Has anyone seen these '37 parts?:

Price: $800 or make offer, I think he's dreaming. I offered him $50 for it, I figure the SS trim piece is worth that much, and was turned down. He probably didn't think it was too funny.

1937 BUICK EIGHT GRILL AND HEADLIGHTS:eBay Motors (item 250555160182 end time Jan-27-10 16:38:04 PST)

!BiUl04g!Wk~$(KGrHqEOKj8EstbgUYYjBLOU5jJlVQ~~_35.JPG!BiUmB5wB2k~$(KGrHqYOKj4EsD))VVgKBLOU6dcTMw~~_35.JPG

He also has three front fenders for sale, $500 each:

250555144264_1_0_1.jpg250555151373_2_0_1.jpg

250555154989_5_0_1.jpg

If he gets anywhere near these prices for these I'll have to seriously think of parting out my '37. I paid $550 for the entire car and the body parts look a lot better than these. If some one coughs up this type of money for these parts the '38 is worth at least $3000!

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He won't sell those parts for his prices, but he won't listen to reason either. Worst part of our hobby. I don't begrudge making some money off collector parts, but it should never be a windfall.

That's why I think $2,000 for a 38 80 series Buick that is fairly complete is a fair price.

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He won't sell those parts for his prices, but he won't listen to reason either. Worst part of our hobby. I don't begrudge making some money off collector parts, but it should never be a windfall.

That's why I think $2,000 for a 38 80 series Buick that is fairly complete is a fair price.

Already he's been offered $500 ( see questions/answers at bottom of listing )

In all likelihood the offerer from Norway will ask that the stainless moulding be removed and shipped to him and the seller will wind up with the rest to advertise again, hopefully not for $800 once the most desirable piece has gone.

What has to be realised is that parts like this ( particularly the stainless moulding ) will be unprocurable in Norway, at any price. If that piece is needed to complete a 20k or 30k Euro restoration then US$500 probably (obviously ) isn't out of the question.

As someone from Sydney ( Australia ) commented earlier, if the 1938 Roadmaster was in this country it would have been snapped up long ago.

I think we are really getting to the stage where these sort of cars are not going to keep appearing. I know the advertised NOS parts for 30's Buicks on ebay are really drying up compared to only 4 or 5 years ago when I was sourcing parts for mine.

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.. It's definitely a Roadmaster trunkback, and almost certainly not a low production 81F (with the divider glass, which would be a real find), so it's safe to say it's an 81.

What seems different to me is that it is the big series car, and no sidemounts.

STYLE #38-4819 indicates its a series 81. 38-4819F is a series 81F [reference 1928-41 Master Chassis Parts book]

My understanding, from other threads here, is series 90 always have side mounts, but were optional on all other series.

Agree with other posts here its all the missing/broken trim, grilles etc that will cost big $. Also says rust in the trunk, but no photos. I would be aking for photos of the trunk.

Edited by 1939_buick (see edit history)
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Good catch on the holes in the fenders under the headlights. Seen very well in the third picture. Those holes should not be there for any reason I am aware of.

Also yes this car is without side mounts which is strange for a Roadmaster but possible.

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I haven't gone to my Parts Books, but I was always told that the 1937 (pictured above with the nose) and 1938 look a lot alike but won't interchage. I just went and looked at the ad. If you wanted that car for a Parts Car, it would be worth $750 or so. If you want to restore it, you're probably going to have to go $2500-4000; the difference being you're not going to be throwing away the body and chassis. The difference between this Series 81 and a 1940 Series 90 is tremendous, because this car is not a recognized Classic car and the Series 90 is. That gives you more varied useage with the Series 90 car when finished. The difference between the two cars is sort of a razor's edge, but as of this moment it is there, and it makes a difference in desirability.

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QUOTE $2000 sounds high to me based on the photos only. My father has an 81 they are great cars, but there is a lot of work needed on this vehicle. Depending on how far you take a restoration I think you'd have more in it than what it is worth even as a driver quality. UNQUOTE

This is always true. I started with a $700 car to play with, got it up to $21,200 and decided to back out and sell. Have it down to $16,900 now, and nobody even answers the ads. Anybody want to suggest a price they think I can sell it for? I'm at a loss. Is it the bad economy? The point is, you've got to look at these cars like this old '38-81 as fun, either fun to restore or fun to restore and use, because to do them even decently right you're going to go way into the hole.

post-30955-143138154818_thumb.jpg

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QUOTE $2000 sounds high to me based on the photos only. My father has an 81 they are great cars, but there is a lot of work needed on this vehicle. Depending on how far you take a restoration I think you'd have more in it than what it is worth even as a driver quality. UNQUOTE

This is always true. I started with a $700 car to play with, got it up to $21,200 and decided to back out and sell. Have it down to $16,900 now, and nobody even answers the ads. Anybody want to suggest a price they think I can sell it for? I'm at a loss. Is it the bad economy? The point is, you've got to look at these cars like this old '38-81 as fun, either fun to restore or fun to restore and use, because to do them even decently right you're going to go way into the hole.

I know my view personally is that I would rather (and am able) to spend a small amount on a project that I can enjoy, and spend a little each time along the way completing it rather than spending all they money up front on a basically done car.

I think many people don't have $16,900 to spend on a car such as your and mine (eventually anyway), but do have a few hundred here and there to spend on one restoring it. Of course many people don't enjoy the dirty work, but I think the majority of us with these old cars at least like opening the hood and turning a few wrenches.

In my case I'm sure I'll end up with $20,000+ in it like you have, but I have no intention of selling it, so I'm not worried about that part. I certainly wouldn't want to put much more than that into it, but if I can have $25,000 in a $15-$20,000 car that I built, I'm happy.

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I think the whole auto market is very soft. I just starting with the Buick but I've been playing with '48-52 Ford trucks for over 25 years and in the last year I've noticed a marked change on eBay when it comes to the Ford trucks. Two things I have noticed, first the price of the parts have gone down quite a bit. A year or so ago anything truck that was listed sold no matter the size or condition. I've seen many trucks that would have sold then go unsold now. I wanted to test this so I about two months ago listed a '48 Mercury radio, this radio is almost identical to the '48-50 Ford truck radio and is fairly rare and very sought after because most trucks back then didn't come with radios. About a year ago I saw a radio that looked like it was sitting outside for years, the ad said it didn't work, sell for $200. I had one in noticeably better shape and it sold for only $50. Second, I've noticed that most of the items being offered are reproduction parts being offered by reproduction parts vendors. I don't see as many of the odds and ends parts that aren't being reproduced like shock mounts, grills and dash parts, the type of items private individuals would have left over from restorations or just laying around. It could be, as mentioned about the '30 Buick parts, these parts are just drying up but I truly think people realize the market is soft and they're waiting for things to get better. I know I am. I could use some extra money and I have a lot of truck parts but I'm not going to sell anything, at least not more than a part or two, until the market gets better. With the current administration and congress I have little faith that it's going to much better any time soon.

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Billy hit the nail on the head for my case. I am 46, have a nice garage (heated/3 car man cave) $10,000 in tools, work 2 jobs and have all the trappings of middle age poor.

If I wanted one nice car in that $12,000 to $18,000 range I would need to go to one of those old car finance companies and I think it would be embarrassing. I would probably get rejected.

However, I have saved the money - what I call seed money - for a worthwhile project. (I already have 3) and once back at the home I could chip away at this for several years in total bliss.

As for the concern about not being able to sell a nice older Buick - or Cadillac etc - here is part of it.

I go to the local town festival car shows in Iowa - there is one about every weekend (i.e. Corn Festival, Covered Bridges Festival, Labor Dat etc)

Of 100 cars, only about 3-4 are pre war originals. The majority are muscle cars. Now, here is the interesting part. Sitting behind the muscle cars are salt and pepper haired fresh retirees or late 50's guys and their wives sitting in those foldable chairs - in the shade - chatting it up with the others that attend these shows every weekend.

They have a picture portfolio in the trunk showing the restoration. You ask about it. They say 'oh I didn't restore this car, heck no, but those are from the shop that did'.

In otherwords, they took their nest egg, hard earned as it was - and lopped off $40,000 for a restored SS this or that - cars that passed them back in the days when they had to drive a hand me down four door sedan.

Now, they can buy your restored or nice driver Buick from the 30's or 40's BUT they would still get passed on their way out of town by their peer's muscle something.

This is the reality.

I inquired last month about a pristine 1946 Chrysler New Yorker 5 Window Club Coupe off of Craigs List. It was a family heirloom, hand me down. Nice car and the seller was cordial in emails and offered it to me for $19,000.

Seemed like a fair price. But of course I had to pass. I would get the application for financing prepared and then just could not follow through. Well, he emails me and says I'm putting it on evilbay. I responded that I would bid $12,000 to prop up the bidding, which had a reserve.

Now you can say my actions were untoward but I knew his price and I knew anyone that bid $12,001 or more was still getting a leg up on a great car. I was not outbid though and he relisted it.

I then bid $12,600 to again help him out and was high bidder BUT this time he dropped his reserve to $1 over my bid per ebay rules. $12,600 would buy an eight cylinder, Imperial crested rare 1946 New Yorker Club Coupe? Wow.

Seller got antsy and was playing with house money. For him, the car was paid off years ago and anything he got would be pocket money. I never thought to "offer" $12,600 back before he listed thinking he would politely decline.

Last month Tom Laferraire - a reputable old car dealer in Connecticut offered an 8 cylinder original 1941 Pontiac that was very nice as is, low mileage, ready to go, gorgeous interior, so on and it sold on ebay for $8,500!

Examples like this are out there.

As for any old Buick I consider, it's not to flip it and make money. The art of restoration is a hobby I enjoy - I just wish I had more time and money for the sub-issues. I am looking for ONE pre war Buick so I can participate in pre war division drives and events.

This 1938 Buick is about all I can afford.

Edited by BJM (see edit history)
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The difference between this Series 81 and a 1940 Series 90 is tremendous, because this car is not a recognized Classic car and the Series 90 is. That gives you more varied useage with the Series 90 car when finished. The difference between the two cars is sort of a razor's edge, but as of this moment it is there, and it makes a difference in desirability.

For me, it's all about it being a big series, not the possible CCCA connection. The math favors Specials in depression era production remains. I would take a 36-38 Special but my preference is a big series Roadmaster.

I am drawn to the top of the line models now.

I can't afford a new Lexus or Cadillac or even Buick - but it's kind of fun to get the top-of-the-line cars from the past, isn't it?

I look for Roadmasters, Cadillacs, Chrysler New Yorkers or 8 cylinders, Imperials, and Lincolns. I never look for Plymouth, Dodge, Chevy and Fords.

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QUOTE: As for any old Buick I consider, it's not to flip it and make money. The art of restoration is a hobby I enjoy - I just wish I had more time and money for the sub-issues. I am looking for ONE pre war Buick so I can participate in pre war division drives and events. UNQUOTE

I didn't buy this car to flip it. I found two other cars after I bought it that I wanted a whole lot worse. That presents me with a severe housing problem. My '39 Buick is not finished, even at $21,200 invested. Some of that is my long stored parts, which didn't cost me much, but I hate to waste, but I can negate their "supposed" financial loss. The car isn't even finished at what I have in it, but what has been done, has been done exceptionally well. I only build Prize Winners if I get into a restoration. The problem is, I forgot about that flaw in my chasracter when I bought this car with the intention of just building a fun car; and so, ended up way deep into it. My loss could be somebody's gain. Because it isn't finished, and I can't personally stand behind it, I put it with a dealer. He got a $15,100 bid on ebay but it was early on and we held out for more....duh, mistake. I told him to list it without a reserve this time, and it's first come, first served. I was going to rebuild the engine and keep the car for tours, but my mechanic had a personal tragedy, and I don't think he wants to take it on now. Going to anybody else it just too scary, financially. I'm not sitting here with bags of money either, especially after my last old car purchase. As for flipping, the blue car pictured has been mine since 1963. I only sell to buy, or sell because a car has given me grief in the same area several times and I'm mad at it. This is the first car I've wanted to sell because I don't want to rent a garage.

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I build mine to drive and enjoy. I never look at an automobile as an investment because I know the time and money I'll put into them I will never, ever get out of them. I figure any one that can buy an old car, fix it up and sell it for a profit is one of two types of person. Either they're a Boyd Cottington or Chip Foose type who has a bunch of deep pocketed clients who want the bragging rights that they have one of the big builders cars and don't care what they pay or they do such a slip shot job on the cars to keep the time and costs low and are cobbled together pieces of unsafe junk. I personally can't see anyone doing all of the work in a garage can make a profit.

None of my vehicles will ever win a points show but I get a lot more out of them when I cruise down the road on nice sunny day and get the numerous thumbs up I receive. My '37 is going to be an as close to stock car using parts from a '40 Buick. I will have to alter some parts to make them fit but no one but a Buick fanatic will know the difference. To me it will drive and ride just like if it was all original.

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My blue car is all stock, an AACA Senior Grand National Winner, still wins after having been finished in 1981, and it has been driven well over 10,000 miles. I drive it on tours, and drive it when I want to. I do not drive it long distances on the Interstate to Meets, I trailer it there, enclosed. The reason? I don't want to use up the rare parts unnecessarily, mechanics who can work on an old Buick are rare, and I don't want the stone bruises from tractor-trailer trucks unnecessarily.

I drive mine too, but I only want cars that are terrific to look at and run well, not just that run well.

Last, the only thing different about a 1940 engine and a 1938 engine, that shows badly is the locatin of the dip stick, which is a dead giveaway. You can change the sidepan, rocker arm cover and spark plug cover and nobody will know. You can upgrade the 1940 engine with insert rods and bearings, and precision main bearings. If you can find them, you can even even upgrade to hydraulic lifters, although I never have (the late Dick Boyer used to do that), and you definitely want to upgrade the oil pump to the 1941-53 pump with 25% larger gears; although you should use a 1940 and earlier bottom plate because of the angle of the neck. The '41 bottom plate tends to put the sump deeper into the pan. Buick supplied a kit for the bottom plate, if you can find it. Otherwise have a machine shop resurface the old bottom plate to make sure it is bone flat. You can do all of that, but you can't move the dipstick.

Edited by Dynaflash8 (see edit history)
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What I'm about to write is probably going to make the purists' toes curl but I'm planning to use as many of the '40 parts I can. I'm going install the '40s front crossmember because the one in the '37 is completely rotted out. The '40's crossmember will bolt right in but the top surface dips down about 2-3 inches lower than the '37's so I'll have to build that area up with a home built bracket so I'll be able to bolt the '37's nose back on. Also, I'll probably use the '40's front and rear engine/transmission mounts because they're like new and the '37's are completely gone. I'd have to get the two rear ones revulcanized which will cost about $200. I would also have to do some major disassembly and installation to change the front engine plate and the rear bellhousing so I could use the '37 units. I may still have to change out the bellhousing but I'm hoping I can work around it. I'm pretty good at fabricating brackets and every modification will be done in a safe manner.

As far as the outward appearance of the vehicle, I've been doing body work for 30+ year and I look forward to repairing the rust damage. The car, when finished, will look pretty nice. I am also planning on building a set of side mount wheel covers. I've found a few set on the net but they are bringing $500+ for a decent shape but when you add shipping it brings the cost close to $700.

I figure it this way, the car was a pile of junk when I bought it. I would think it could have easily been determined as a total lost, maybe a parts vehicle at best, and whatever I do to it can't diminish the value. I can only improve the value. I'll never get my money out of it but it's a vehicle my wife and family actually seems to like, that's an important factor for me. She has never shown the slightest interest in my trucks.

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My big deal is having them look authentic, through and through. Whatever you can do to upgrade the car mechanically that doesn't show, that doesn't mislead the younger, viewing public about how the car appeared, historically, is fine by me.

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I appreciate keeping them stock. Nothing grinds me more than when I see a hacked up modified car and find out from the owner that he started with a low mileage car he bought from the original owner's widow. I've seen many vehicles like this. They're argument is that they shouldn't have to work with a rotted out car and cars were made to be modified. With my car, if it were a low mile car with a solid body and good running engine I would try my best to get it back to original with all year specific parts but my car is a bucket and I please with saving what is left.

beginning01.jpg

BTW, for some reason when I look at all that needs attention on the car and feel a little overwhelmed I just take a look at the pictures of the car and see one really awesome car!

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I appreciate keeping them stock. Nothing grinds me more than when I see a hacked up modified car and find out from the owner that he started with a low mileage car he bought from the original owner's widow. I've seen many vehicles like this. They're argument is that they shouldn't have to work with a rotted out car and cars were made to be modified. With my car, if it were a low mile car with a solid body and good running engine I would try my best to get it back to original with all year specific parts but my car is a bucket and I please with saving what is left.

beginning01.jpg

BTW, for some reason when I look at all that needs attention on the car and feel a little overwhelmed I just take a look at the pictures of the car and see one really awesome car!

Whenever you feel overwhelmed by a project like that, try not to look at the "big picture". Do the small things and it will eventually be done. What a great car, by the way!

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I don't find it any less expensive to make modifications than it is to rebuild originals. I think that's a falacy. The biggest problem with Buick's is that closed driveline that few living today know how to work on and fewer care to work on. Otherwise, all of the expenisve stuff like chrome, paint, upholstery, glass, rubber, wiring, tires is all the same. Modifications are basically a copout, because everything you need is quite available. Aw yeah, you can probably buy a box 350 Chevrolet engine cheaper than you can rebuild a straight 8, but it doesn't stop there, because then you have to change the transmission, and then you have to change the rear end and driveline, and that'll probably mean you have to change the wheels. I think modifying is strictly a matter of desire and choice to have more of the comfort features of a modern car. Of course you can also just go buy a modern car to get that too.

Now, aren't we well off of subject.....this man wanted to know if he should buy the currently ebay listed 1938 Buick Model 81. If he's a mechanic and body man, and he likes it, I say he should buy it. Otherwise, run.

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I'm one of those guys that wait and bid at the last 8 seconds.. (called sniping) I win 99% of the time... if there is a part, or a car that you want, bid the max amount that you are willing to pay (at the last 8 sec) for that part or car you want. you will probally win. I have a atomic clock right here by the computer and wait and bid with 8 sec to go and no one has enough time to rebid, so you win... If you bid early, some one will come back a bid right over top of you and the price goes up..:)

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So you use Sniper? You brag about it? You know what? I know how to do that, but I don't. It is unfair and you know what else it is. I would rather lose than win that way. Worse than that, is that eBay allows it.

"Unfair ???" Everyone has the same opportunity to snipe. There are enough programs out there to even do it for you and I too have found them to be useful. What's unfair is when you bid $100 and someone just runs the price up purely out of curiosity. What's unfair is when the seller's cousin or brother runs the price up just to kick the price along. What's unfair is when sellers have 2 or 3 accounts and run their own prices up. There is nothing "Honourable" about eBay. It's you verses them. It is what it is.

Danny

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Buick : Roadmaster:eBay Motors (item 330391347354 end time Jan-07-10 15:20:42 PST)

Well the auction is over. $640. I bid to $1700 but did not need that cushion. In the last day I emailed the seller twice.I had additional questions in another email (i.e. where's the grille and missing stainless?)

Regrettably I have not heard back. He did respond to an earlier email so I felt we had started a good communication.

Unfortunately, I am a big emailer and when someone does not respond to my emails in a timely manner (several hours) I am disappointed. He had to have been watching his auction.

Edited by BJM (see edit history)
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Buick : Roadmaster:eBay Motors (item 330391347354 end time Jan-07-10 15:20:42 PST)

Well the auction is over. $640. I bid to $1700 but did not need that cushion. In the last day I emailed the seller twice.I had additional questions in another email (i.e. where's the grille and missing stainless?)

Regrettably I have not heard back. He did respond to an earlier email so I felt we had started a good communication.

Unfortunately, I am a big emailer and when someone does not respond to my emails in a timely manner (several hours) I am disappointed. He had to have been watching his auction.

Seems to me the auction close should have read "$1,700.00...reserve not met". Instead it says "$640.00 reserve not met". Why didn't your $1,700.00 bid show up? I have also run across sellers that do not respond to emails......what's up with that?

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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