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This photograph is another racer I would like to identify. The photo was taken in the San Diego area and I believe that it maybe a twenties desert racer. It looks like a production car turned into a racer but I cannot place it. It could have also been run at Pikes Peak.

You may know what it is based on the lettering on the hood which appears to read ...... 6-66 special.

I think I see an E before the 6 66 Special on the hood. Could this be a Paige 6 66? Of course it is highly modified from an original Paige.

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And our last garage of the day...... a very professional Packard Dealer shop doing a valve job on a 1930-31 model. One man is working on the valve seats, the other is grinding the valves on a valve grinder. The workbench behind them has a cylinder boring bar on it which makes it a very well equipped shop. This could possibly be a factory service photo.

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I'm always looking for odd and unusual subjects when I surf around the web. One of my favorite items has been the railroad conversion of passenger cars for use as track inspection or work crew vehicles. In later years, Hy-Rail conversions made them more flexible in their uses, but before that, they were put together in the railroad's own shops, usually from a bigger sedan and various train related bits. Here is a group that run the gamut from a rather forlorn looking Buick on the Pere Marquette to a very bright and shiny Packard that seems to me to have the railroad equivalent of whitewalls!

<a href="http://s865.photobucket.com/albums/ab215/woodburner802/Track%20Inspection%20Cars/?action=view&current=PM-IN_2.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i865.photobucket.com/albums/ab215/woodburner802/Track%20Inspection%20Cars/PM-IN_2.jpg" border="0" alt="Buick"></a>

<a href="http://s865.photobucket.com/albums/ab215/woodburner802/Track%20Inspection%20Cars/?action=view&current=1930Buick.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i865.photobucket.com/albums/ab215/woodburner802/Track%20Inspection%20Cars/1930Buick.jpg" border="0" alt="1930 Buick"></a>

<a href="http://s865.photobucket.com/albums/ab215/woodburner802/Track%20Inspection%20Cars/?action=view&current=1932Buick.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i865.photobucket.com/albums/ab215/woodburner802/Track%20Inspection%20Cars/1932Buick.jpg" border="0" alt="1932 Buick"></a>

<a href="http://s865.photobucket.com/albums/ab215/woodburner802/Track%20Inspection%20Cars/?action=view&current=M820-1.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i865.photobucket.com/albums/ab215/woodburner802/Track%20Inspection%20Cars/M820-1.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>

<a href="http://s865.photobucket.com/albums/ab215/woodburner802/Track%20Inspection%20Cars/?action=view&current=Paige.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i865.photobucket.com/albums/ab215/woodburner802/Track%20Inspection%20Cars/Paige.jpg" border="0" alt="Paige"></a>

<a href="http://s865.photobucket.com/albums/ab215/woodburner802/Track%20Inspection%20Cars/?action=view&current=M600.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i865.photobucket.com/albums/ab215/woodburner802/Track%20Inspection%20Cars/M600.jpg" border="0" alt="Packard 1"></a>

<a href="http://s865.photobucket.com/albums/ab215/woodburner802/Track%20Inspection%20Cars/?action=view&current=M243.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i865.photobucket.com/albums/ab215/woodburner802/Track%20Inspection%20Cars/M243.jpg" border="0" alt="Lincoln"></a>

<a href="http://s865.photobucket.com/albums/ab215/woodburner802/Track%20Inspection%20Cars/?action=view&current=1939BuickSpecial.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i865.photobucket.com/albums/ab215/woodburner802/Track%20Inspection%20Cars/1939BuickSpecial.jpg" border="0" alt="1939 Buick Special"></a>

Edited by fotofan (see edit history)
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The big one, a Pierce-Arrow Model 66, 825 CI, mid to late teens. With a polished hood and offered by a dealer named Max Arnold.

T - Mr. Arnold looks a little smug, and certainly has every right to from his position behind the wheel of that very impressive car!

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A wonderful photo taken circa 1903 of Oscar Bergstrom and friends. The Penge Automobile Co. was on 3rd street in Minneapolis. The center automobile looks like a Cadillac and the one right maybe be an Autocar.

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A fully accessorized 1905 Tourist, check out the size of that horn! It is a rear entrance tonneau with a nice set of picnic baskets on the side. They were manufactured in Los Angeles during the time of 1902-10.

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Who can identify this good sized 1904-06 rear entrance tonneau. They sure look like they were enjoying what was called the motoring craze back then.

It appears like it maybe be a four cyl. double chain drive

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This is a 1909 Durocar which was another automobile that was manufactured in Los Angeles between 1907 and 1911. This car had a two cylinder engine and a two speed planetary transmission and in 1910 they also made a four. This photo was taken in San Diego during 1909.

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Photo of Gable in his Duesenberg which if I remember correctly he had restyled in CA. It still exists and took best of show at Amelia Island in 2008.

Note: Thanks Packard32 for letting me know. That means the photo is post 1941 so I deleted it.

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Edited by T-Head (see edit history)
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A couple of Fords' loaded with accessories, the left being a 1932 five window Model B with more than enough gee gaw's on it. The right one being a 1933-34 Tudor with after market wheels, skirts and mud flaps.

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Here is a nice set of four Packard assembly line photos. The second photo looks like possibly 1937 115 or 120 line. The last two photos appear to be a senior series line from perhaps 1940. I am sure some 30's Packard expert can tell us more and also something about the body line in the first photo.

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I found this photo the other day which is related to the set of photos of 1938 Plymouth factory shots. This shows the press in its entirety for stamping the one piece tops that we looked at a week or so ago. I have seen similar sized presses in a factory in the past that made parts for the big three back when they where actually that in the late 60's and they are very impressive in operation.

My dad was a tool & die and my brother is still in the field. They worked for a company in Waterbury, Conn. called Anchor Fastener that made stampings for the automakers and had a building the size of a football field filled with presses like this. It was the most impressive thing I have ever seen in operation. It is all gone now and finally closed last year.

PS. We passed 500 posts today and 16,000 views. Thanks for helping us get this far.

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Edited by T-Head (see edit history)
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This Metz roadster is evidently involved in some type of contest or tour in Minnesota ( I think it was an AAA Reliability Tour) as indicated by the fifteen on the radiator. I love the action involved in this photo and also the fact that horses could help an automobile go somewhere it could not on it's way to totally replacing them.

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Edited by T-Head (see edit history)
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Got to be one of the oddest "tow cars" I've ever seen, what with the boom added on without hacking off the back half of the sedan body. Any guesses about the make and year of the car or who made the boom? That bird on the radiator cap makes me want to say Chrysler, but I'm not bettin' the farm on it!

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I think this is one of the best threads. Super good pictures.

Thanks Larry, I would like to take this opportunity to ask more people to get involved submitting photos. We are all looking forward to seeing whatever gems you have. We need your help to keep this thread going. Thanks, T-Head

Edited by T-Head (see edit history)
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1933 brought a wave of Studebaker powered cars to the Indy 500 lineup following the promising performances in 1932 by factory and independent entries.

The worsening economy of the depression reduced the winner’s purse and the lap fund awards went unsubscribed. To make it worse, 5 men died, 2 in qualifications and 3 in the race. Of the 42 starters 20 were Millers, 9 Studebaker, 5 Duesenberg, 4 Hudson, a Buick, a Chrysler & 2 Cooper.

<O:p</O:p

The Studebaker factory team was improved over 1932 with 4 team cars getting new aero dynamic bodies designed after University of Michigan wind tunnel tests showed they reduced wind drag over 20%. The engines were the latest “P” version President 9 main bearing 337 CID inline 8 cyl also relocated in the chassis for better balance. All engines were test run on dynamometer machines to confirm reliability and power output. The 5<SUP>th</SUP> car #47 was privately owned and only had mild changes its 1932 body.

<O:p</O:p

Independent Studebaker entries included the Art Rose #38 Commander 8 engine 260 CID with front wheel drive driven by Dave Evans who surprised everyone when he finished 6<SUP>th</SUP>. In the end of the 14 cars still running, 7 were Studebaker powered. The best factory finisher in 7<SUP>th</SUP> place was #34 driven by Tony Gulotta. Even with all positions from 6<SUP>th</SUP> thru 12<SUP>th</SUP> filled by Studebakers this was the last factory attempt to win at Indy, the company went into receivership later in 1933 and survived to manufacture cars until 1966.

<O:p</O:p

The images show A_One of the 1933 Rigling sample cars, Luther Johnson driving, *The metal wire spoke wheel covers were not used in the race;

B_Cutaway view of 1932 frame with new 1933 aero-body & bellypan;

C_One of the President race engines on dyno;

D_The factory five car team;

E_One of many “Promo” posed team images at Indy track Pagoda;

F_Another Pagoda pose featuring the Pierce Silver Arrow *A Studebaker Division at that time;

G_The Art Rose #38 car that finished 6<SUP>th</SUP> *Kirkpatrick Photo incorrectly inscribed “5<SUP>th</SUP> Place”; H_The #34 car that finished 7<SUP>th</SUP> in official factory photo *Note the white shirts and ties.

Stude8

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Got to be one of the oddest "tow cars" I've ever seen, what with the boom added on without hacking off the back half of the sedan body. Any guesses about the make and year of the car or who made the boom? That bird on the radiator cap makes me want to say Chrysler, but I'm not bettin' the farm on it!

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1924 Cadillac 5-passenger Landau.

The "bird" on the radiator is an aftermarket ornament....

My first thought was Chrysler, but the "loop" door handles and combination of oval quarter window and landau irons identify it as a Caddy.

Wonder if they closed-in around the boom on the back, or just left a gaping hole in the coachwork ?

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