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yourchemicalbrother

Chassis Corrosion Protection

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I own a couple newer vehicles that are very seldom driven (probably a half dozen times a year) simply because they are limited editions and we get snow over six months a year. Currently I noticed that the chassis and some of the engine components on my truck are experiencing excessive rust (note it’s just the chassis not the body that’s rusting). I contribute this to the relatively damp and not well sealed garage that I store it in. I was wondering if any classic car owners that store their vehicles for long periods have any experience with a corrosion protection system (cathodic, anodic or otherwise) that actually works and doesn’t cost a fortune. I have disconnected the battery cause I hear this may contribute to the problem.

I realize that a good cleaning and paint is the answer here but I don’t have the money or facility to complete this and I don’t have the option of moving either to another storage building. I guess I’m just looking for a way to slow this process down on my truck and prevent it from occurring on my car that is currently rust or corrosion free.

Thanks for the help

Edited by yourchemicalbrother (see edit history)

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How about spending a weekend with POR 15, some good painters coveralls, and some use and toss brushes. The POR will bond to the rust like a best friend. It will however be modifying the original finish (rust) a bit. The best way to apply it would be if you have a buddy with a lift so you don't have to lay under it. DO NOT get it on you with out getting it off like right away. Once it sets up a bit it is going to have to wear off as it does not COME OFF.

Good luck

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Yes I know what you mean. The steel used in some manufacturers newer vehicles is pathetically chincy and prone to rusting quickly.

The most effective and inexpensive method I have found to prevent this is spraying hydraulic oil on the chassis and underbody. This method is used by many others in my area as well.

Hydraulic oil seems to be the right viscosity and it contains antirust additives. I use used oil but you could do new if you don't have access to used oil. I apply it with a small $15 pump-up garden type sprayer and mix maybe 10-15% diesel fuel so it flows easier not just for the application but also for flowing into the nooks and crannies.

Its a little messy but not too bad and the vehicle will drip for a day or so but after that you are good to go. If the vehicles aren't driven in salt you may only need to apply every 2-3 years. I would do it every 2 years on my truck which was driven every winter. The chassis looked as good after 14 years as other truck that were 2-3 years old with no protection.

Edited by JZRIV
spelling (see edit history)

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There is a product called LPS-3 that comes in aerosol cans. It is designed specifically for corrosion protection. I have used it for years on ag. aircraft with great results. It leaves behind kind of a parafin like film. It is temporary (it will wash off) but on a stored car will last a long time. It will not attack rubber parts and is non-toxic. The closest comparison would be cosmolene in a can.

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Change your storage to reduce moisture is the most effective route.

The devices that turn your car into a cathode to stop rust ignore how rust occurs. Most of the rust on your car is due to local conditions. You also need to understand that pure water on a perfectly clean steel will not easily cause rust. A minor contamination in the water and you have a tiny battery and now you have a chemical reaction making lots of rust. Now if you put 300 volts on that piece of steel and put the same contaminated drop of water you will get the same amount of rust.

Yes that idea works on something like a boat where everything is in the water, but you still get localized corrosion where there is electrical shading and such.

If you choose to cover the parts with chemicals (por 15 or an oil corrosion protector, then you are altering the original and may cause the same amount of work as if you did nothing. You have not protected the value of the vehicle or its original-ness.

More than one guy keeps his investments in a controlled environment. You must ask what you goals are and will they be responsibly economical for your wallet.

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Yes I know what you mean. The steel used in some manufacturers newer vehicles is pathetically chincy and prone to rusting quickly.

The most effective and inexpensive method I have found to prevent this is spraying hydraulic oil on the chassis and underbody. This method is used by many others in my area as well.

Hydraulic oil seems to be the right viscosity and it contains antirust additives. I use used oil but you could do new if you don't have access to used oil. I apply it with a small $15 pump-up garden type sprayer and mix maybe 10-15% diesel fuel so it flows easier not just for the application but also for flowing into the nooks and crannies.

Its a little messy but not too bad and the vehicle will drip for a day or so but after that you are good to go. If the vehicles aren't driven in salt you may only need to apply every 2-3 years. I would do it every 2 years on my truck which was driven every winter. The chassis looked as good after 14 years as other truck that were 2-3 years old with no protection.

This works quite well. The only thing I'd like to add is that driving up and down a dry dusty road while the chassis is still dripping locks the fluid in place.

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I own a couple newer vehicles that are very seldom driven (probably a half dozen times a year) simply because they are limited editions and we get snow over six months a year. Currently I noticed that the chassis and some of the engine components on my truck are experiencing excessive rust (note it’s just the chassis not the body that’s rusting). I contribute this to the relatively damp and not well sealed garage that I store it in. I was wondering if any classic car owners that store their vehicles for long periods have any experience with a corrosion protection system (cathodic, anodic or otherwise) that actually works and doesn’t cost a fortune.

I own, I use it and I endorse it wholeheartedly. The "it" is the CounterAct Rust Inhibitor system. It is not cheap, but I can tell you it does in fact work. I have had one on a 1997 Nissan KingCab XE pickup for about a decade. No rust whatsoever, and the truck is parked outside during our Wisconsin winters!

It is an electronic device that consists of a central unit (black box) and two pads connected to the box. One pad goes on the front fender/wheel well/frame, and the other in a similar location, only on the opposite side, on the rear.

While it may sound like a lot of "smoke and mirrors," I am here to tell this device is for real.

You owe to yourself to check it out. Here is the link -

CounterAct Electronic Rust Protection System - Corrosion Control

You may also check out what I have to say about the device on pg. 1 of the June, 2009 issue of Car Collector Chronicles, accessible from the link set out in my signature.

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