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drum brakes help


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Dear friends.

I'm working in a Chrysler 1931 racing car, which used to use hydraulic drum brakes where the shoes goes outside the drum. Instead of expanding they press the drum just like those old time handbrake system.

They systems seams to be very effective...but not common at all.

If anyone has information....whatever you have...I'd really appreciate it!

Thank you very much

Fred

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Racing cars often had specialy constructed systems not common with normal passenger cars, I hadn't heard of a hydraulic "Band" brake system before but did scan some details of the 1926-30 Buick mechanical band brake system for a fellow not long ago. I'll attach the adjustment procedure from the Chilton service book I have.

Stude8

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I have seen contacting hydraulic band brakes on the earliest Chryslers about 1924 with the rounded radiator shell before they went to the "ribbon"type. Richenbacker also used the same system. They are probably what you fellows would call a Rube Goldberg. The shortcomings of these are :

1) the drums are steel rather than cast iron, and do not have the best possible friction characteristics.

2) The drum where the lining works does not have sufficient mass, and so for the same conversion of kinetic energy into waste heat, the material will be significantly hotter; and while there will not be the same expansion brake fade as internal brakes, you do not know how efficiency may alter at higher temperature.

3) Modern linings may be less suitable.

4) In the wet, contracting brakes can be chancy, because water trapped between lining and drum acts as a lubricant until it dries out. You can prevent this by cutting grooves in the lining about 2 inches apart at about 45 degree angle so the water is expelled inwards rather than make your wheels dirty.

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I have seen contacting hydraulic band brakes on the earliest Chryslers about 1924 with the rounded radiator shell before they went to the "ribbon"type. Richenbacker also used the same system. They are probably what you fellows would call a Rube Goldberg. The shortcomings of these are :

1) the drums are steel rather than cast iron, and do not have the best possible friction characteristics.

2) The drum where the lining works does not have sufficient mass, and so for the same conversion of kinetic energy into waste heat, the material will be significantly hotter; and while there will not be the same expansion brake fade as internal brakes, you do not know how efficiency may alter at higher temperature.

3) Modern linings may be less suitable.

4) In the wet, contracting brakes can be chancy, because water trapped between lining and drum acts as a lubricant until it dries out. You can prevent this by cutting grooves in the lining about 2 inches apart at about 45 degree angle so the water is expelled inwards rather than make your wheels dirty.

Ivan

Thank you very very much!

by the way...you mention Rickenbaker...I'm also working in a rickenbaker project. I was unable to find much info about it...Any idea where can I get it?

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If your are going to race a car you need good brakes, and if you are going to use what is there you need to improve them as much as you can. You should be able to find where I have described a couple of times before how to improve these brakes by rebuilding the working surface with a thermo spray coating of Metco Spraysteel LS. This gives similar friction characteristics to sg cast iron, and is compatible with modern linings. You need to look towards the beginning of my posts on the forum; and for some reason, when the forum was upgraded my original posts were downgraded by an underscore inserted in my name. I have no idea how to correct this, but the stuff is all still there.

I have a friend here that I do not see often who has a six cylinder Rickenbacker. It was a dismantled car, and I do not know its point in progress just now. I used to know of an 8 cylinder engine of one, but it is not traceable now though it must still exist.

All I have is tuneup data that you should be able to access over there through ACCA or HCCA Foundation libraries together with Detroit Public Library Automotive Collection. I have National and Radco manuals, but I cannot scan or photocopy; but can only transcribe a limited amount: So the libraries may be a better source for you.

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Hello Ivan

I tend to agree with all the comments re external contracting band brakes I guess that it all depends on how original you want the car to appear. Personally I think that I would be looking for some slightly latter Chrysler Internal expanding brakes they are really very good.

While on your site Ivan how long does it take for your Antique Automobile mag to arrive?

Bernie J.

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