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jeffanderson

need V12 help-PLEASE!

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New to the website. Could someone please advise me on a problem.

I have a 48 Continental Coupe and just got it back from a complete rebuild. Just as before the rebuild it runs great cold. After getting hot many times it hesitates and will often shut down. After it shuts down it will not start for a hour or two until it cools off again. It is very frustrating as I can't trust taking it anywhere and I don't really want to make it just garage art! I heard of some vapor lock problem but please tell me where to start.

Thanks

Jeff Anderson

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It sounds to me like your ignition coil is getting too hot and breaking down. Once it cools down it restarts. Next time it does it,try another coil.

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I agree on the coil, was it rebuilt??? If not, it is a must. You spent all of that money on an engine rebuild.... your rebuilt coil and distributor will make a world of difference... Jake Flemming did mine... they work great. Good luck!!

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I have a coil jake did in 96..I replaced it with another I had Skip Haney in punta gorda fla

rebuild..Jake is swell..great guy, but my skip coil throws a hot blue spark twice the intensity

I am sold on it... Skip replaces the coils in the bakelite case...Jake cleans them...I will sell you my jake coil for 150.00 if you want..I have it as a spare...

pm me , i will send it right away...I strongly reccomend new condensers..they cause miss fires and bucking ...

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I have had the coil problem. The '49 Dodge I had would cut out after a few minutes of driving and would not start up until the coil cooled off. I sold the car very cheap before I figured out the problem. I still have my own footprint on my butt from kicking myself. The car was MINT except for that problem. I was only 17....what did I know about coils? ZILCH!

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Run it till it wont restart, simply chk for fuel ..(look down carb throat as you pump accelerator.it should squirt fuel) or crank and pull a couple wires to check for spark..weak,

orange is not a good sign..You could have fuel vapor lock even if glass bowl has some fuel

the carb may not...or when it dies..dump a little raw fuel or ether or carb cleaner in carb..see if it kicks.....coils , coil resistor (under dash on black board with headlight circut breaker) fuel pump, rubber fuel line between pump and firewall all suspect...

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I have used both Skip and Jakes coils... both have a great "blue spark". In my opinion, the quality is magnificent on both... you choose whose price you want to pay, and turnaround time... both quality guys!!

I agree on making sure that there is fuel coming from the carb when you work the throttle, also pulling a plug wire to see if it is indeed the coil..... good luck!

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One last thought. Had a '65 Continental that would do the same thing..drove me nuts until I discovered that the vent in the gas tank cap was plugged. After driving it a while the tank would creat a vacuum that the fuel pump couldn't overcome. Discovered it when there was a rush air when removing the cap after a "shut down".

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One last thought. Had a '65 Continental that would do the same thing..drove me nuts until I discovered that the vent in the gas tank cap was plugged. After driving it a while the tank would creat a vacuum that the fuel pump couldn't overcome. Discovered it when there was a rush air when removing the cap after a "shut down".

There is another thread on here with a 1932 Dodge Brothers that included the vented gas cap idea. That was indeed the culprit.

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Jeff, Just for poops and chuckles, try running your car without the gas cap...if and when it quits, pull a wire and check the spark... lets make sure that we have it narrowed down completely?? If the spark is good, check to see that you have fuel when you work the throttle.. Let us know my friend!!

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Jeff, did you get your distributor and coil taken to Jake yet? let us know how it turns out if you would!! Merry Christmas!!

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Jeff,

Just another thought on your problem with the car, has the distributor rotor been replaced with a new one? i.e. brand new, not a new old stock item,

The originals are very prone to developing cracks, and can leak the spark away to the other slip ring, or to earth via the drive spindle, they can perform perfectly when cold, but as soon as they start to warm up and expand a bit, that's when the problem starts.

To test for this.

If you have the distributor off the car with the coils removed, set the body of the distributor 3/8" from your bench vise.

Find yourself any old working distibutor, coil, and battery, 6v or 12v it doesn't matter.

Clamp this distributor into the vice, wire it up to the coil and battery, so that when you turn the shaft, you are getting a nice fat spark jumping from the coil to the vice, this is the test spark for your rotor on the v12 distributor.

Temporary fasten the coil HT lead to the 1st slipring on the Lincoln dist, attach another piece of HT lead to the vise and hold it about 1/4" away from the arm on the 1st slipring, spin the shaft on the vise distributor, you should have a nice spark, gradualy increase the gap until the spark stops jumping, has it now started jumping between the Linc dist body and the vise (3/8" gap), if so the slipring is leaking to earth through the shaft.

Now hold the lead near the 2nd slipring, spin the distributor in the vise, there should be no spark coming from the second slipring, if there is the rotor is leaking between the two sliprings, you should only have a spark between each slipring and it's own arm.

Repeat the test with your test coil lead attached to the 2nd slipring.

If all is well, and there are no sparks leaking where they shouldn't, and this is most important, repeat all the above tests again while gently warming the rotor with a heat gun, it doesn't have to be very warm, you may find it works perfectly cold, but gradualy deteriorates as it gets warmer, with sparks leaking all over the place, if you find any leaks, dump it and get a new one, you should only have a spark between each slipring and it's own arm.

Sorry if this sounds a bit complicated, but it's pretty straightforward, and a good test for the rotor, work carefuly to make sure you don't get any stray shocks of the rigup.

Regards

Peter Smith UK

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i have the same problem and i turn on a electric fuel pump and

engine comes back to life

gene

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Hey B1rdman if you're turning on an electric fuel pump and the problem goes away then the coil isn't your problem. You most likely have a weak return spring in the fuel pump. Remove the top of the fuel pump and stretch the spring a bit and retest. Or you could get a rebuilt kit. I had the same problems a bad coil and faulty fuel and was chasing it for some time. Good luck George.

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that was why i posted it, most people get hung up on the coil.

when it could be fuel

gene

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For the coil problem I purchased the Coil Conversion plate from Gerry Richman and I run two modern 6volt coils and I haven't had a problem in 3 seasons. I will send the old coil out to Skip's to be repair. George.

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that is what i am going to do. i have a plate of plexi glass, and turned the brush holders

and other stuff on a lathe, got my two coils already to go.

gene

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I'd loosen the gas cap to the first notch and familiarize my self with the coil and carry the tools needed to change the coil. Maybe even find a spare coil. It could be more important than a spare tire somewhere along the line. Quiting after they get hot is the first sign of complete failure on down the line.

Ctskip

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Ok; a spare coil is one thing to have as a spare in case of break down. I got mine from a guy in AZ that said he had a few of them ranging from $100-200. I also carry a voltage regulator, spark plugs and have on order points and carbon brushes.

What other items are suggested for the emergency kit?

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Emergency kit?? Now thats wide open to interpretation. Some guys will want enough spare parts to almost do a rebuild on the side of the road, while others will say just bring a cell phone. I bring a few tools to replace a few spare parts,(bulbs, belts, nut/bolt, a gallon of potable water and a blanket and a flashlight. Never leave home on a road trip with out your cell phone. My wife is always reminding me of that.

Ctskip

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