Blackout

1942 Buick Roadmaster 76S

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 I have bought hubcap clips from Bob's in California. It looks like the car has been a bit of a chameleon in its' life!

 Keith

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On 16-10-2017 at 12:29 AM, Blackout said:

Over the past couple weekends I decided to experiment with some oven cleaner and wax.  Now, I know the reaction most people probably have, but I've already committed to taking down to bare metal once I have the available funds; I just wanted to see what was under the horrendous layer of goopy primer covering the entire car and to see if there was any hope in bringing out some sort of patina prior to full tear down.  I found at least 6 different colors on the car (original brown base and metallic maroon; some salmon color, red and blueish grey paint, and a nasty top layer of brown primer covering just about every exposed surface including rusted panels.    

 

Also, I found beauty rings and the 42's center caps.  Any idea where I can find correct center cap clips? 

 

 

Buick Patina.jpg

Buick Center Cap.jpg

 

Oh my… she’s so sexy! If I see this I would say: deal with safety and tech first (sheet metal, wiring, brakes) and don’t worry about the paint until you’ve driven it as is. Enjoy how she drives. She looks quite straight and, completely biased here, she is worth all the effort. It’s not the cost and value that counts, it’s the passion you put into it and the love you get back. 

 

I own a ‘49 56s which is IMHO one of the best designed cars ever, but way up there with it are the 76s of the years ‘42-‘48 and owning a car like yours is my secret dream. :)

 

*edit* Oh boy, I just found out I love the ‘42 76s the most due to its grille… You really do own one of the best designed cars ever! *edit*

Edited by Wilf Sedanet (see edit history)
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Yep, wiring and sheet metal are on my short list; brakes are ok for now.  Just needed a simple, immediate-result project!  I like the sedanettes from 42-50 and 49 is a particular favorite.  

 

Interesting note, I just learned that 1942 was really the first year where most of the design elements were modeled from the Buick Y-job, the first "concept" car.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buick_Y-Job

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Edited by Blackout (see edit history)

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Fix the brakes, new tires, nothing bangs in the engine or grinds in the gears?  You're good to go.

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I decided to move on to the interior--a dreaded task!  I thought I "vacuumed" pretty thoroughly until I took out the seats and found 5lbs of shredded newspaper and other rat debris!  Despite some significant challenges working around frozen door/window handles, I was carefully able to remove most interior items without much fuss other than the constant plume of disintegrating fabric, rust and dust.  I tried my best to salvage the patterns and oiled up the metal trim elements that are faux wood-grained. 

 

Now I can truly assess the degree of sheet metal work on the floors and other structural elements :(.  Anyone have any tips for removing the door/window handles?  I'm pretty sure the plastic covered handles were unique to 1942 but all of them are quite degraded.

 

Some cool discoveries, such as the 1936 Lincoln Wheat Penny in the ashtray, the "Body by Fisher" stamp, and an interesting wood window guide thingy.  Forgot this car came with a heater under the passenger seat.

 

 

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 The window handles are usually held in place by small clips that are hidden once installed. There is a tool which is sold that is supposed to help to release the handle from the shaft. I've never had much luck with them, and I've bought three of them, instead I use two very small flat head screwdrivers to slide them out.

 The bezel which surrounds the crank handle can be depressed towards the outside of the car a bit, like 3/8ths of an inch or so, then you can see the retaining clip, and either buy the tool I mentioned, or use screwdrivers as I described above. I am going to my garage later, and could take a picture of the one I have, which I think is hanging in place on the wall. The other thing to be careful of, as I've had those clips launch themselves when they slide off, so take care they don't hit you or a helper in the eye, or simply fly off into never never land!

 Hope this helps.

 Neat car, looking forward to seeing more of it.

 Keith

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54 minutes ago, Buicknutty said:

 The window handles are usually held in place by small clips that are hidden once installed. There is a tool which is sold that is supposed to help to release the handle from the shaft. I've never had much luck with them, and I've bought three of them, instead I use two very small flat head screwdrivers to slide them out.

 The bezel which surrounds the crank handle can be depressed towards the outside of the car a bit, like 3/8ths of an inch or so, then you can see the retaining clip, and either buy the tool I mentioned, or use screwdrivers as I described above. I am going to my garage later, and could take a picture of the one I have, which I think is hanging in place on the wall. The other thing to be careful of, as I've had those clips launch themselves when they slide off, so take care they don't hit you or a helper in the eye, or simply fly off into never never land!

 Hope this helps.

 Neat car, looking forward to seeing more of it.

 Keith

Hi Keith:

 

Yeah, I found the clips and removed them but the shaft splines are frozen inside the handle.  Not sure how to unfreeze them without damaging the shafts but will purchase new window/door mechanisms if I need to.

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Take a pb blaster can and put the red tube into the nozzle.  Stick the nozzle into the clip groove and spray a little bit in there.  Tap the outside of the handle a couple times with a soft blow hammer.  After a time or two over the course of a couple hours, it should break free.

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On ‎10‎/‎31‎/‎2017 at 10:58 PM, Blackout said:

I decided to move on to the interior--a dreaded task!  I thought I "vacuumed" pretty thoroughly until I took out the seats and found 5lbs of shredded newspaper and other rat debris!  Despite some significant challenges working around frozen door/window handles, I was carefully able to remove most interior items without much fuss other than the constant plume of disintegrating fabric, rust and dust.  I tried my best to salvage the patterns and oiled up the metal trim elements that are faux wood-grained. 

 

Now I can truly assess the degree of sheet metal work on the floors and other structural elements :(.  Anyone have any tips for removing the door/window handles?  I'm pretty sure the plastic covered handles were unique to 1942 but all of them are quite degraded.

 

Some cool discoveries, such as the 1936 Lincoln Wheat Penny in the ashtray, the "Body by Fisher" stamp, and an interesting wood window guide thingy.  Forgot this car came with a heater under the passenger seat.

 

 

IMG_20171028_173326_361.jpg

IMG_20171029_092821599.jpg

IMG_20171029_092933713.jpg

IMG_20171029_092948304_HDR.jpg

IMG_20171029_161116820.jpg

IMG_20171029_161717045.jpg

IMG_20171029_093150761.jpg

IMG_20171029_093202696_HDR.jpg

IMG_20171029_120847954.jpg

IMG_20171029_161141711.jpg

IMG_20171029_161012432.jpg

Cool penny!  And lots of other work too!  Be sure to wear a mask when removing mouse infested upholstery.

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12 hours ago, jackofalltrades70 said:

Take a pb blaster can and put the red tube into the nozzle.  Stick the nozzle into the clip groove and spray a little bit in there.  Tap the outside of the handle a couple times with a soft blow hammer.  After a time or two over the course of a couple hours, it should break free.

Tried that.  I haven't had a chance to go back out to the car, maybe it just needs more time to soak.

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