Sign in to follow this  
Guest mystarcollectorcar.com

Cars I should have bought

Recommended Posts

reading these posts reminds me of a story 2 friends of mine drove up to jersey to buy a 48 tucker they were loading the car on the trailer and the wives got out of the truck looked over the car and moths had made three small holes in the headliner so they got there money back and left the car with the owner

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest my3buicks

In the very early eighties, 81-83 - I had just graduated from college and had started working. A 53 Skylark surfaced in my area for $5000 - it was ugly, they had painted it tan with brown fenders or visa versa, can't remember which now and a tan or brown vinyl interior, but ran and drove beautifully and was really in good shape. Man I wish I had bought that ugly swan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sort of reminds me of a car for sale right now...1928 Dodge Brothers Victory Six roadster. Same situation...lovely car, gotta have it...got no money. ARG!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the mid sixties there was this funny 3/4 size 58 Cad with suicide doors and a stainless roof that sat behind a Gulf station. I repeatedly tried to find the owner but the station operator was expecting to acquire it for storage costs so was very unhelpful and it had no plates.

Couple of decades later I saw it with the same cracked vent window glass at Auburn and a many digit price tag.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ooh, so many...still trying to reach my rear end with a foot for missing the chance on a 36 Ford Roadster and a 32 Ford tudor V8. Was looking for a Model A and followed up a lead back in Michigan - about 1967 I think. Looked over a couple of A's and walked right past a 36 Ford Roadster sitting outside rotting away, and a decent low mileage original 32 Tudor in the barn. Cold have had them both for less than a grand. Then there was the 55 T-Bird at the tire store where I bought some red-lines back in 66. $500 including a rear-ended parts car! Biggest miss tho wasn't really my faut. An elderly neighbor had a nearly brand new 57 Chevy but couldn't drive the stick shift anymore after a fall on the ice one winter. His sister drove the car on rare occasions but wasn't happy with it either. Pretty car and just like new! Never in rain or snow. When I joined the Navy, the car was supposed to be mine, but when his wife passed away a couple of years later, the sister moved in and promptly traded the 57 in on a 69 or 70 something with an auto trans. I was told the dealer gave them an allowance of $500. That 57 still had dealer installed plastic seat covers on it and even smelled new!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In 1960 I had a chance to buy a 1957 Corvette, venition red with cream coves and hard top for $1,200. My Dad was ready to co-sign a loan for me until my older brother said he thought I would kill myself in the car, too fast for me. The truth be known he was jealous that I might get the car. I never got the car and never had another chance to buy one.... ever!

I was a better driver than him then and now and I've owned many fast cars since.

Another car I wish I had bought in the 60's was a 1940 Ford roadster convertible. This car was souped up with a chevy engine and 39 Ford tranny. The car was damaged because it was in an accident. The owner, a young guy like myself at the time, was killed drag racing on the streets of my home town. The front end of the car needed repair but other than that it ran great. The kids Dad didn't want to sell the car, he wanted it junked because his son died in it. He didn't want some other young guy to die driving it. I didn't understand then, but I do now having had kids of my own.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it was 1969 and I could have bought a '67 Plymouth Satellite Convertible with a 426 Hemi and a 4-speed.We drove it and my Dad said "you would kill yourself in this car" so I had to pass on it at $1200. Yikes! I also had a chance at a 1934 Chevrolet touring car with a Studebaker V-8 in it for $75. Once again Dad put the kabosh on that one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:) In early 1962 I was working at a Plymouth dealership shortly after my job( just a car washer , gas pumper, grease man, and parts chaser) at a Rambler dealership (half a block away) ended because they went bankcrupt. After working there a year, I wanted a newer car than my nice '55 Buick Century 4dr ht, and after talking to the salesman, I got my cost for a new '62 Belvidere 2dr.ht V8 stickshift , white with red leather (or vinyl) bucket seat interior. The cost came to $2,100, and I almost ordered it, but ,having owned a couple of Buicks and coming from a'Buick family', I went a block away and bought a low mileage '59 Buick LeSabre 2dr ht. for $1,900 from the local Buick dealership. The Plymouth dealership's owner and the salesman were'nt exactly happy, but they got over it shortly since one of their top mechanics owned a late model Ford. I'm still a Buick man after about 14 full size Buicks and 7 Buick Rivieras, but I wish at times that I would have bought that Plymouth.

Of course, there are a lot of cars that I owned that I wish I had today, mostly Buicks.

:) kaycee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

not a car that i should have bought but one i did then let it get away and reget it ever sense

1953 mercury montiray 2 door ht got out of a salave yard in abilene tx in 1959 for the hi amount of $90.00 cash if i could get it off the yard before he closed (in 20 minutes)

this car looked like a new car and i couldn't find anything wrong with it.(it only had 55 miles on the odometer)so i bought it.

the carb was missing so i asked the yardman what the story was, he said"that the dealership sold the car to him because it had had the carb. stolen from it at their lot and the dealer filled an insurance caim .

i found a carb. off a 49 ford and it ran fine

i keep the merc till i went into the army in 62 and got sent to ft. ben then i got orders for nam in 65 and sold the car to a state trooper in ga. when i came back i tried to find the merc but it was gone.

i forgot all about it until 1970.

my wife and i went to arlington tx to a car museum

and there was that white and green merc.

will

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was 1971-72 or so, I was working for Hemmings and living in Bennington, Vermont. One Sunday I took a drive up Route 100 to a point about 40 miles up where there is a fork in the road. There was an antique shop there that had for it's company car, a 1948,49,or maybe '50 Ford F-1 1/2 ton with what I think was a Cantrell woodie station wagon body. I think the lady was asking around $3000. I thought that was a lot of money, but not terrible as it was really nice and all original. She sold it, and I have never seen another one like in in the almost 40 years I have been working in the old car hobby as my career. Geez, I which I would have bought that wagon. Of course if you want to start talking about the ones I did own and let get away over that same time period, whew.......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Amazing that it was in the boneyard by the 1950's... but by then, it was probably a tired, shabby, "funny-looking" car, that you "couldn't get parts for"...

Nice to see it returned to glory !

:cool:

Believe it or not that was the second narrow escape that car had.

There was a complete article on the car in an English magazine a few months back. They said the car was originally built in 1925 with a conventional body. In 1934 the original body was junked and the present body put on by a Belgian coachbuilder who usually built buses.

At that time it was a 9 year old used car. Such a car had very little value in Europe, for one thing cars got obsolete quicker for another, the gas and license taxes were very high for a car like that, beyond the means of the average person even if the car itself was cheap.

So if the original body was in bad shape, or the car in an accident, it was lucky the car wasn't scrapped in 1934.

They found the coachbuilder but could not determine who commissioned the body. The Belgian coachbuilder is long out of business and their records lost.

Rolls Royce's records told them who the original buyer was and they could trace its ownership in the US after the war but there was a period from the twenties to the forties where its ownership is a mystery.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My tragic tales are many but here a couple of my favorites. In 1978, I was in need of basic transportation and purchased a rough but good running 1942 Chevy 1/2 ton p.u. as I thought it would be usable for making extra money on the weekends. I paid $225 after looking at a one owner, 1963 Lincoln convertible in need of a water pump that was also selling for $225.

I was working in a garage on a used car lot in 1983 and purchased a nice one owner 1956 Ford Fairlane sedan, excellent orignal paint, interior, etc. that needed a generator and regulator at trade in for $500. For the same price I could have purchased an even nicer 1953 Kaiser, another one owner trade in, but decided the Ford would be easier to find parts for.

I have always enjoyed the Advance Design Chevy trucks and in 1989 purchased two, one in good condition and one parts truck for $500. The same gentlemen had a very nice Dodge Sweptside for the same price but I couldn't afford it and the Chevies.

My favorite story of missed opportunity took place in 1990 when I passed on a buyer take all Arizona ranch yard clean out. To make it worse, I told a friend, he bought the vehicles and I helped move them. These included a 1965 Plymouth convertible, driveable conditon, 1941 Plymouth p.u., running but no brakes, 1937 Olds sedan, complete but not running, 1955 Cadillac Coupe Deville with continental kit, not running but complete, mid 60's Chrysler convertible, complete and driveable, mid 30s Terraplane p.u. complete but non running, and a J2 powered Olds hardtop s/w, complete but not running. All for the sum of $4500!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My ones that got away....

As a school boy in the late '40's, I was driving a '37 Olds sedan that I had cobbled together from a sad 2 1/2-fendered heap. (I bought the missing parts for it from a character running a small junk business who would always say "that's the onliest one I got"). I aspired to something better, and along came a nice '39 Lasalle convertible. Its owner needed a family car and liked the Olds. A deal made in heaven? The LaSalle appraised out at around $450, while the Olds was $300. Ugh, no dough, no deal.

Some years later, a friend was caring for a '37 Lincoln LeBaron Convertible sedan belonging to a guy who was off in the army. The front stuck out of the garage about 5 feet because it was so long, but it hadn't suffered much deterioration. When he returned home from the service he decided to go to law school, and not keep the Lincoln, so it was to be put up for sale. I had the inside track, it hadn't been advertized and no one else knew about it! However, I was living in an apartment and despite all efforts, I couldn't find a place to keep it. Reluctantly I passed on it. Price; $250.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've missed many a nice car over the years as one of my best friends is a wholesaler and he had a car lot where I hung around. But one I always wish I had bought was a 67 Plymouth Belvedere GTX that was an original Hemi powered car, 4 speed. It had a 440 in by the summer of 72 but the rest was original and did it ever haul a$$. A another friend owned it at the time and lost his job or was hard up for cash, as he was asking $1200. Someone more astute than me scooped it up after he offered it to me first. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's one I saw just yesterday. A 1978 Mercedes 280 2 door hardtop with 90000 km on it (about 55000 miles). Looks good but the upholstery is cracking. Not running, asking $1000.

One part of me says I should buy it but the other part says no. I have a feeling if I don't buy it I will regret it later but if I do, I will regret it later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My uncle sold Chevies in New Hampshire from 1948-1976 and he was always coming up with some good trades. One in particular was a '56 210 4 door hardtop that he sold to my uncle in 1961 when it had 13K on the odometer. It was black, had a 265 power pack and powerglide. No radio, dog dish caps, etc. My uncle sold it to another uncle (his brother) who later sold it to my grandfather. My grandfather traded it for a '63 Impala in 1968. The 210 had 80K on it then. I wanted to buy it (I was 16) but my parents said no. It left the family for $75.

A couple of years later, I needed transportation for college. My uncle found a '61 Impala sport sedan with 30K on it for $600. It was 9 years old then. Had a 348, turboglide, PS, PB, PW, PSeat and a bunch of other options. It belonged to an elderly couple who always traded with my uncle. I passed because I thought it would use too much gas. At about the same time, a woman I did yard work for wanted to sell her '61 Lincoln Continental 4 door convertible. It was black with black and white leather interior. It had 41K on it. I passed again because of the gas mileage. She ended up selling it to her mailman for $650. I tried to get my parents to buy it but they couldn't see the investment potential. I told them that if they bought it, kept it up and didn't use it that much that it might be worth $5000 some day. Ha! I ended up with a '64 Corvair 700 that proved to be a total lemon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was in high school (early 80's), a junk yard was closing and offering any car for $50. There was a Metropolitan I wish I had bought, but my dad would not let me.

Also in high school there was a Ford Retractable Hard top for $800 that I was denied for the same reason.

The first year I was married (late 80's) there was a 1910 Detroit Electric in rough shape for $700. If I had a garage it would have been mine. There was also a running 1907 1-Cylinder Cadillac with the Victoria touring Body for $6500.

Oh well. Now, back to work on my time machine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1921 Marmon speedster, knock off wheels, phillipine mahogony dash, could have won preservation awards. Old ranchers in Wyoming had it in 72 for 10K, which may not have been too big a steal at the time, except that it came with a Marmon sedan of about the same vintage....also, ...once bought an old upside down body and its front and rear axles. Body was quite complete and solid, just rather fallen apart. It was about 1970, and I begged my father to take the body and the hell with the axles, but he was old school and could see reasonable usefulness only in the axles! We did not have room to haul both, so oh well. The car...it was a 33 or 34 Ford Cabriolet!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back in 1971 while out in Auburn, Hills Michigan buying a 1936 Dodge Brothers sedan for $25.00 for the rear end gears, the owner of the property, Mrs. McKim, offered me a couple of other cars. I was only interested in getting my '36 touring sedan on the road, so I passed on the other two cars. One was a 1940 Packard formal limousine that was lying on it's side. The lady's husband thought it would "store better that way". She wanted $200.00 for it. It was really complete and very nice. Had the divider glass, too. The other was a partial car. It was the complete chassis and complete front end (including engine and trans) with fenders and cowling for a 1931 Marmon V16. Really, the only thing missing was the body. She wanted $100.00 for it. I was 17 years old and did not know what I was passing up. I knew that the Marmon was rare, but where oh where would we put it once we got it home?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had a chance to buy a new1970 Dodge Hemi Daytona Charger that had sit on the dealer's floor until 1971. Nobody wanted it. I passed on it....now anybody guess what they are worth? Makes you sick to watch Barrett-Jackson!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Then there was a copper colored 1950 Dodge woody in Pacific Beach/San Diego, Cal. It was a very nice and solid car except it was missing a rear side door and I figured $500.00 was way too much for a car I would not be able to find a door for. That was in 1974.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There have been less of these than the cars I did buy and should have kept, but everyone has sad stories. A few that I remember:

Early 1930s Rolls Royce Town Car Limo with open drivers compartment for $2500 in the late 60s. Very nice original, needed tires and a water pump. Had no money.

1967 or 68 Lamborghini Miura sitting on a used car lot in the early 70s for $5000. Might as well have been $100,000 on my salary.

1967 Shelby GT350 for $1200 in mid 70s, nice but needed some front end bodywork. I was ready to buy this car but did not have the cash on me, lost it. I have never made that mistake again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two I looked at and didn't buy, then one I did

In 1967 I looked at a White 1963 Corvette split window 327/365 with a blue interior and 36,000 miles that looked brand new and selling for $1,200 in Camp Hill, PA. At the time I was 17 years old and $200 short.

In 1969 I let a British Racing Green 1955 MG TF 1500 that was selling for $1,100 get away. I decided to go home and think about it and when I when back the next day it was sold.

In 1970 I finally bought a 1933 Chevrolet Master 5 window coupe that I still own today. Everything is still original from when I bought it with a few exception. See it on my website at : Bob's Vintage Cars

Bob Beers

AACA, VCCA, VTR, TRA, CPTC

1933 Chevrolet

1962 Triumph TR4

1984 BMW 633 CSi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last year at the big swap meet here in Springfield, there was a 1964 Wildcat convertable for sale. Not in the corral. The guy was asking $5000...!! I had my head up the proverabial posterior, I guess. Was looking for parts for my 50 Buick. Had just bought the second 50. Didn't think I needed another. Passed it by. About a half hour later I awakened to what I was missing. Too late. Sold marked on the windshield. Who says men don't cry??

Ben

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this