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1930 Chrysler gearbox question


Guest LR1970

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Guest JohnArthurSpinks

Leigh,

Clutch judder would be very evident as the disc would not be running true without support.

If this has been occurring for some time it is possible that the front bearing in the transmission who have taken a lickin and would be starting to get noisey.

You would hear it whining with the engine running and the transmission in neatral with the clutch engaged.

The noise would most probably go away when the clutch pedal is pushed to the floor.

Cheers

John Spinks.

Aussie Airflow C9 Coupe

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Thanks, well it sounds like I don't have a bearing problem. I have a 1930 "66". I think I have a dragging clutch. My car is very hard to change gears, I have to get the right rpm to make it shift. I took the inspection cover off the top of the gearbox and the clutch plate is still turning when I push the clutch pedal in. I am guessing that it is supposed to stop turning when I push the clutch pedal in.

Leigh

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Thanks, well it sounds like I don't have a bearing problem. I have a 1930 "66". I think I have a dragging clutch. My car is very hard to change gears, I have to get the right rpm to make it shift. I took the inspection cover off the top of the gearbox and the clutch plate is still turning when I push the clutch pedal in. I am guessing that it is supposed to stop turning when I push the clutch pedal in.

Leigh

Even with a fully released clutch I think there could be some motion in the plate and input shaft. Basically a balance between drag between the clutch disk/pressure plate on one side and how much drag there is in the transmission, largely a matter of how heavy the gear lubricant is. Are you saying that when the engine is idling and you depress the clutch pedal that the input shaft and counter shaft in the transmission continue to rotate? If they do rotate, and you have the right weight lubricant they, yes, your clutch is not fully releasing. But its not clear to me based on your description.

What kind of gears does that transmission have? For an equivalent year Plymouth they'd be square cut and you'd need to double clutch to shift quietly regardless of how well your clutch is releasing.

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Guest DeSoto Frank

Also, most pre-1935 cars have a solid clutch disc, with no damper springs around the hub, so the clutch is either "in" or "out" - if you try to gently slip the clutch to get the vehicle under-way, you'll get a series of "bunny-hops"... this shouldn't be confused with "clutch-judder" in later vehicles.

I am sure some vehicles are less- prone to this than others... your results may vary.

Also, to clarify - there are two bearings on the input shaft - the pilot bearing / bushing is in the end of the crankshaft, and is usually either a plain bushing or a needle or roller bearing.

The other bearing is in the front-end of the transmission case, and is identified as the "input shaft bearing".

If the tranny has not been out of the car recently, I wouldn't be surprised if the pilot bushing / bearing is either dry, or loaded with stiff, sticky grease.

If the car is in running order, try running the engine up with the car in gear, and the clutch depressed, listening for any noises from the clutch area that sound like squeeling, wheezing, rasping... these could be indications of a dry / worn-out pilot bushing/bearing.

And the first step should be making sure that the clutch linkage is properly adjusted, with no more than 1/2" to 1 " of "Free-travel" in the clutch pedal - if the clutch linkage is misadjusted (too much free-play), this could contribute to clutch dragging.

As Ply33 noted, most of these cars did not have synchronized gear boxes, so they shift differently then "modern" (post-1935) gear-boxes.

Your signature describes the '30 Chrysler as a "barn-find"... if you're resurrecting a long-dormant car, I would suspect sticky / dry pilot bearing/bushing.

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When a car sits around for years it is common for the clutch to stick to the flywheel or pressure plate. Since you have an inspection hole the fix is easy. Push the clutch pedal down or prop it down with a stick between the dash board and clutch pedal. Stick a knife blade down beside the clutch plate and pry it loose. Do both sides. Turn the engine a little and do it again, work all the way around. Give it a shot of brake kleen spray.

Now go for a drive. Once the clutch is freed up some use will polish the surface and it will be good as new.

If the car is going to be stored for months or longer, keep the stick and prop the pedal down while it is in storage. This will not hurt anything in fact it was recommended by car makers when their cars were stored for long periods as during WW2 when many cars were taken out of service due to shortages of gas and tires.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
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