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Water Distribution Tubes


Jake 1938

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Help! I have read threads herein that describe "fishing" out the remaining broken off parts of a corroded water distribution tube. I have tried, but I can barely see the tube, let alone latch on to the pieces remaining. I would hate to throw out the block as its the original for the 37 Royal and is otherwise totally salvageable. Does anyone have another idea for removing the remnants of the water distribution tube? Much appreciated.

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Thanks hchris. I was able to remove approx. 5 inches - obviously closest to the water pump. I have sprayed penetrating oil and ATF into the jacket. I have been "fishing" with a wire hook, but have not been able to "latch" onto anything. My next move, subject to any better ideas from this query, it to go in with a long drill and just "bust up" the tube, as the remainder looks like "swiss cheese" (as much as I can see). The real problem is my inability to see the tube or the get a good grip on it - all due to the deterioration of the tube from corrosion.

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Do you have the head off? The core plugs out of the side of the block?

There is usually a buildup of mud and rust in the water jackets. Try spraying or squirting CLR calcium lime and rust remover in there and let it soak. Follow with a water spray to loosed deposits.

The old tube had holes in the top to let the water out. I have had good luck using 2 or 3 hooks at the same time. Bend them out of coat hanger wire. Get them as far back in there as you can and hook them into the tube. Then pull all at once. If you can get the thing moving back and forth it will eventually come out. A slide hammer is good.

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Hello, if the engine is out of the car there is a welch (soft plug) in the rear of the block that when removed the back of the distribution tube can be seen. I have done this and was able to get the tube out with coaxing from the front and rear.

Good luck,

Jay

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jazzer3 there is a soft,welch, core plug at the rear of the block but it is in the centre and will not help in removing a stubborn tube , i have removed or had removed tubes from 1937 through to 1956 side valve 6 chrysler engines , all of them i have had problems with , 2 more than the rest , those ones i took to a engine rebuilder , he had to drill the back of the block to punch what was left out , then drill and plate the back of the block

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once long ago I had a block out and poured oil into the tube hole and let it soak for a week or so. Then took it to an old guy that had a seriously old repair shop. He had a homemade tool that was about 1/4 in. thick or so and was a equipped with a large hook at the end. This was a slide hammer affair. It worked rather well.

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

I have been delinquent for not checking in - sorry. I have had no success in spite of all of the good advice. One item for all - Lysol toilet cleaner (or similar) has a high concentration of hydrochloric acid and works great at cleaning out the jackets. The approach calls for plugging all frost plugs or other holes and pouring straight cleaner into the water jackets and letting it soak for a day or so. It is amazing what it takes out. When you drain the engine of the cleaner be sure to give it a thorough rinse. It warrants caution and prep as you don’t want to pour straight cleaner in your jackets in a place where you cant get the engine rinsed off. Good idea when restoring an engine and wanting to improve cooling and coolant flow in block.

I am still struggling with the block. Just sent it for a hot tank hoping further cleaning. Will try all of the approaches described above again. Difficulty lies in getting something strong enough to latch on and then finding a good point to latch on. Visibility and control are limited due to inability to see what is happing 20 inches into the jacket. Thanks all for your help and ideas – stay tuned.

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There are flexible camera devices available for looking into awkward spots, rather like a surgeons tool when operating internally. In the aviation game they are used to inspect the interior of cylinders and turbines etc. if you could get hold of one you could feed it down the tube with hook at the same time and see whats going on.

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  • 3 months later...

hey Jake...

keep using use the coat hanger method... or... you could have the block boiled out.. or REDI STRIPPED that will do it.

By the way.. if anyone is playing around with concentrated acids, always remember the cardinal rule "" A & W ""... always add acid to water. Never add water to acid!

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I had a similar problem and used a 30" long hacksaw blade from a reciprocating hacksaw (blade looks like a regular hacksaw blade except on steroids). Ground a long taper on the blade, but left a hook on one end (sort of like a giant saw blade tooth). I inserted the hook end into the dist. tube and caught on to one of the slots on the top and used a slide hammer hooked to the end of the blade. Eventually came out. I realize most won't have such a hacksaw blade so you can use a piece of 1" or wider metal banding. Very strong stuff. It helps if you have a good tube handy so you can judge where the slots in the tube are.

Good luck.

Don

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  • 2 months later...

Thanks everyone for your ideas. I thought I better conclude. I found another block so never finished the effort on the problem block - it had other issues. Had a similar issue with the "new" block but was ultimately successful. It boiled down to using everyone's advice. Clean up Make up a tough and long metal strap about 1 inch tall and 3/16 inch thick. Grind a hook on one end and drill a hole in the other. Insert the hook and attach a slide hammer in the hole. In the end it was just a continuous effort of working it out in pieces until fully removed.

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  • 1 year later...

I have new old stock water distribution tubes. I have Metal and Brass in most instances. If you’re motor needs one please send an email to Oldcartech@gmail.com

I will need the year, make, Mod, & eng 6 or 8 cylinders.

I cannot stress enough just how important it is for your motor to distribute water properly. It is absolutely a must that water is distributed around each cylinder as required by the motor manufacturer.

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