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windjamer

Recruit young members.

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:DI think we all will admit the future of our hobby rest on the shoulders of the young. We must intice them or as we pass so will our hobby.

Here is an idea. How about a class at your local show for kids? I dont mean model cars, but real I built it I love it all welcome cars owned by kids 18 years old and younger. Welcome them to your show, they may cruse the rows of our cars and fall in love with a 42 Ford or a 32 Chev. I am going to suggest this at our next club meeting, I challenge you to do the same.:)

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As you know Dick, we just completed the Vintage Tour yesterday in Fuquay-Varina. Wednesday night a major State Highway was blocked off and detoured. Our Tour group was invited downtown and displayed for the general public to get off close and friendly with on the main street. We had young and old look around and ask questions, as we stayed on the street for about 3 hours. The street was quite crowded. We also had a police escort back to the hotel since it was very dark by the time we had left. We were pleased, the shop owners were pleased, and the public was very pleased. We have been invited back next year!:eek::)

I'm not sure Judy Edwards is ready for another National Tour this early quite yet.:)

Saturday morning, as Gloria and I were getting packed to leave, I had a few ladies at the breakfast nook table ask about our cars, where we were from and so forth. One elderly lady at the table shared a story as a young girl during World War II. She said that her girlfriends would ride around town looking for boys in a model T and she would have sure liked to ride in a rumble seat again. She had arrived 2 days earlier and I told her she should have asked one of us for a ride. We would have loved to help her share old memories in the rumble seat of an A. It seems the public is still afraid to ask about rides because they think all old cars are "show queens" when, in fact, our touring cars are driven as designed and we all appreciate company and sharing our love for our old cars.

Dick, I think we need a stronger advertising plan.

Wayne

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This topic is as old as the "I Hate Hot Rods" outlook, and I just don't get it either. I discovered the hobby in 1961 when I was 10 years old, you either get it or you don't, you can't force anyone into this hobby. Sure, Dad had a huge influence on my life and I have all the Revell Highway Pioneers he'd put together on the dining room table. I'd cut out any auto related story in a magazine or newspaper, before that day in July 1961 when I placed two quarters on the counter and bought my first issue of Hot Rod. Model car building was a far bigger deal in the early 1960's than it is today, all the kids I knew got to build things. Model kits, club houses, tree forts, downhill racers, modified bicycles. Today it is jock sports and internet games, tuner cars. I wouldn't spent too much time trying for the 18 year olds and younger, 30-45 that still have jobs is were the next wave of members are IMO.:)

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I agree with 37hd. I have a son in his last year at a regional high school that serves 4 large towns. He claims out of 1500 kids, only one or two show any interest in real old cars, let alone something like a genuine muscle car from the 60s.

He also said the majority want "fast, new, and a warantee".

The few kids that actually want to turn wrenches are doing so on 4cyl "tuner cars" or 4 wheel drives. Most kids don't enjoy working on anything. I can't blame the kids; gas is expensive as well as insurance and they need a car with good mileage and looks sporty to them.

Us older folks grew up in a time where mileage was not really considered, and we were not flooded with all the other entertainment inventions like videos, computers, off-road quadding, etc, etc. Kids are living in such different times, compared to the way we grew up.

They can't relate to a really old car. We can, because we used to see them as kids, either on the road, or junked by a barn.

As far as the reference to "hot rodding", you can see the different paths the guys in their 20s and 30s take when building a rod. They build a ratrod from a bunch of unrelated parts because a good complete early car is out of their budget.

Sad to say that nothing stays the same. The T guys went through this change decades ago. The model A guys are doing OK because it seems they organize better with determination and very active touring clubs.

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.........The model A guys are doing OK because it seems they organize better with determination and very active touring clubs.

The Model A guys are doing great as a matter of fact. I just toured with them this week. I was continually waving them by as they were all driving around 45-50 miles per hour. They had one that I knew of that had some kind of engine problem, but parts were not an issue. It seems that everyone can relate to Model A and anyone who says they won't keep up with traffic should try to follow them around for a week.:D

Wayne

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Just me $.2 worth. Getting kids today to follow their parents is like getting a car to followyou down the road behind your motor home without a tow bar. there are too many distractions. My own daughter, who, though not entirely brought up on old cars, was non-the-less exposed to them as a teenager, shares none of my enthusiasm for my collection outside of what she can get for them when I die(boy is she in for a surprose). I do not know the answer.

The one local show in my area is run by the local high school which has an excellant auto-shop and the show has the class you suggested, yet they do not walk around looking at the older cars, just each others rice-rockets. I fear our days are numbered.

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Times are changing at a rapid pace and whether we like it or not, this hobby is going to change too.

As mentioned above, we as kids used to build model cars. I remember going to local car dealers and scrounging as many brochures as I could get my hands on, taking them home and building scrap books with them. Imagine any kid doing that today. Really, why would they?? We think old cars are sort of art. Sure, there we be some here or there, but nothing like it ever was then. I can see it in my grandkids now, how they are interested in other things that will never be any interest to me. And believe me, they come from a huge old car family. We'll have to deal with it.

Edited by Skyking (see edit history)

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Maybe I am just lucky. Maybe it is genetics, maybe it is the southern attitude and reverence for history... I don't know what it is, but it seems to me that letting kids ride in old cars, and letting young people drive old cars seems to be working in my area. We have young folks interested in the hobby here.

My son is almost 21. My daughter is 11. He likes old cars, even though he is busy with other things and can't always make it to car club events. My daughter really likes riding in (and driving... off of the road to keep it legal) our Model A Ford.

People have been lamenting the failings of the younger generation for thousands of years. Time marches on and our hobby will do the same. Have faith.

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The Model A guys are doing great as a matter of fact. I just toured with them this week. I was continually waving them by as they were all driving around 45-50 miles per hour. They had one that I knew of that had some kind of engine problem, but parts were not an issue. It seems that everyone can relate to Model A and anyone who says they won't keep up with traffic should try to follow them around for a week.:D

Wayne

AACA is alive and well. Remember that all of us Model A Guys who were screaming by Wayne's Essex (some of us at 55 to 60 mph I might add...) are all members of AACA. Yes, I am a member of other clubs too.... but.... Those 57 or so Model A Fords were all participating in the AACA's Vintage Tour!

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I'm not sure the outlook for getting young people into the hobby is as bleak as it seems at times.

I just did a quick count, and it looks like about 168 of 1,700 car show notices that were sent to me for posting on my website this year were either held at, or sponsored by, or benefited a school, mostly high schools.

That's a pretty decent number and seems like it must represent at least some interest by younger people.

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Bill just turned sixty-five on July 2nd. He started working on what are now antique cars when he was nine with his dad. His dad bought cars that people didn't want to spend any more money on. They worked on them, fixed them up and sold them. When Bill was old enough to drive he rarely was without a car. They had For Sale signs in them and when they sold hopefully there was another one to be driven around.

I turned fifty-eight on April 30th and growing up I liked looking at old cars but we sure couldn't have afforded one on my dad's newspaper editor salary. I helped my dad when he worked on our modern cars but it still was working on a car with my dad. I got into antique cars because of Bill. We now have three. Two project cars and the M-B 450SL driver.

I think that kids need to be exposed to old vehicles. If for no other reason than if they aren't, how will they know if they might be interested? It is also a way to teach them respect for where the cars of today started. Respect for the property and hard work of others. And it gets them out of the house and away from the electronic world.

I don't know if our young friend Daniel will love old cars when he grows up, but he sure enjoyed the ride in the M-B on the day this photo was taken.

post-36313-143138127712_thumb.jpg

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I think young people are still interested in old cars. I used to stage a car show and model exhibit at the local K-8 school and the kids were crazy about it. I set it up where some of the older kids could help with the show such as giving parking directions, registering cars, tallying votes, passing out door prizes, etc and they had a ball. One of the car owners told me one day, John, these kids love these cars. I think the deterrent to more kids getting involved in the cost to play, not having people to expose them to old cars, and being encouraged to stay away from the cars at shows. i know the cars have to be protected but is it taken to extremes sometimes? I was at Winchester, VA for the AACA show there in May and Reggie Nash gave a young fellow maybe 15 a ride in his 1909 Nash. That kid came back with a grin as wide as his face was. If I knew how to contact the kid for his permission I'd post the photo here to prove it. Reggie then took my 16-year old cousin and me for a ride and I doubt Jonathan will ever forget that.

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I'm 30. I'm BCA's National Vice President and an AACA life member. I have two pre-war cars.

Seems like youth is involved in old cars to me!

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I always jump at the chance to take a kid for a ride in my '31. It seems that their families never hear the end of it. They are always excited. A lot of them think that my coupe is a truck, so I simply educate them to the fact that this is what cars used to look like and that the designs changed as technology progressed (not in those exact words). They always seem eager to learn. One kid is STILL telling his family about his ride from 7 years ago. Now, if that means later that he will be into getting an old car, who knows? I hope so.

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I think that kids need to be exposed to old vehicles. If for no other reason than if they aren't, how will they know if they might be interested? It is also a way to teach them respect for where the cars of today started. Respect for the property and hard work of others. And it gets them out of the house and away from the electronic world.

AMEN!

I think the history of our generation is very different than the history we're writing for our kids' generation. Most of us, myself included, starting tinkering around with old cars (to the best of individual abilities) around age 14 or 15. What ELSE did you have to do when you when you were 14 or 15??? If you weren't on the football/baseball/hockey/track/etc. team you could:

a. hang out on the corner.

b. watch soap operas one of 3 TV channels.

c. play with toys intended for small children.

d. play an instrument or listen to records.

e. stare at a fish tank.

My son (17) spent the last 5 years fighting aliens and stealing cars in "Liberty City".

If you go outside in any suburban neighborhood today you'll see empty lawns. There is just too much in our society geared to 13-15 year olds (TV, movies, video games, Facebook, iPods, etc.) They have too much to do already, and it's our fault for giving it to them.

Anything that exposes kids to something that isn't bought at a Target or at Gamestop is a plus.

The idea of a separate juvenile division and judging I think is excellent.:) It may be that some of us will have to live with seeing AACA badges on Maaco painted Fairmonts and Mazda trucks, but if that's too much for us to bear for our kids then it says more about us than them.

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not to burst no bubbles,shop rat,but to me your m-b is not old ,lets get them into old cars,pre war and not dessert storm

We have a 1939 Dodge that Bill is working on. We have a 1963 1/2 Falcon Sprint also being worked on. They are not currently running. So we drove the car that does run up to his house to take Daniel, who was six then, for a ride in it. He was thrilled. To him that is an old car. :D

Edited by Shop Rat (see edit history)

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Shop Rat,not meant to be,rude,just was pointing out,or trying to,that 70s 80cars are not old to me.60s cars do not seem old,pre war cars do seem old.Heck here ,if is not 4wd ,or funny exhaust ,the younger folks will not stop and look

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:eek: Thank goodness for page two. I was starting to think I was part of a group of grumpy old illegitmates :eek: defeated befor the start. I dont know if my idea would work,but I do know if you allways do what you allways did you allways get what you allways got. At the concours last year a youngster maby five was trying to see inside my car. His mother was all hiper telling him get back ,dont touch.!! I thought she would flip when I picked him up and sat him behind the steering wheel. With both hands on the wheel and a smile from ear to ear on his face I snaped a picture. When I gave him back to mom all he could say was I want one. Wish I knew how to post that picture. Bottom line if you dont invite them in, they wont come.:)

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It's a cycle...First cars, tractors other machanical things. Then dates and romance. Then pitter patter of little feet. Then after all that wears off, the seed that was planted at a young age takes over and it is back to cars, tractors, and other mechanical things. So just plant the seed while the're young.......

As for me, :P I never left the first stage. ;):D Dandy Dave!

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Shop Rat,not meant to be,rude,just was pointing out,or trying to,that 70s 80cars are not old to me.60s cars do not seem old,pre war cars do seem old.Heck here ,if is not 4wd ,or funny exhaust ,the younger folks will not stop and look

Okay, I understand they are not old to you. When the other older cars are done he will get to ride in those too. And I will bet that when he gets his driver's license (in eight or nine years) he will get to drive whatever antique car(s) we have. My husband is the one that taught his mom to drive a standard shift car.

wj is correct, we must expose kids to this hobby in whatever fashion we are able to do. It may stick. It may not. But at least we will have tried.

Edited by Shop Rat (see edit history)

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Shop Rat,not meant to be,rude,just was pointing out,or trying to,that 70s 80cars are not old to me.60s cars do not seem old,pre war cars do seem old.Heck here ,if is not 4wd ,or funny exhaust ,the younger folks will not stop and look

How old were "antique cars" when AACA was founded? 25? 30 years old? It didn't matter back then, why does it matter so much today? This I will never understand.

Edited by Bluesky636 (see edit history)

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Here in Sweden the old car hobby is quite popular among young people, i have lots of friends driving around in old chevys, buicks, desotos and so on from '40s, '50s and '60s.

I bought my Chrysler disassembled when i was 18 (i'm 21 now) and worked on it for about a year with help from friends before i got it registered.

But sure, it's not in everyones taste. Especially these days with all the talk about cars being bad for the enviroment..

I think the key is as someone mentioned here earlier, you've got to show that you can have fun with your car and invite somenoe along for a ride to show it. In my eyes a car is not a fragile glass sculpture, it's a car.. :cool:

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Here's my Chrysler and my friends '60 Buick, Juli this year. Attending the large car show "Power big meet". Claimed to be one of the largest car shows for american cars 30 years and older. (Attending cars from all over the world. longest distance last year vent to a guy with his mustang from Mexico :) )

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This is an important topic IMO, just a few notes:

I agree that part of the problem is that a teen and pre-teen has so many recreational activities that their attention span for old cars is not what it used to be. I also got into cars early with toys and such, and was sparked by building model cars. The modern kid seems uninterested in building a model, they just buy one already made and have no involvement in the process. The same when a real car is desired in their teens, no assembly is involved, just get one and drive it. And the affluent parent has little interest in making the first car a character building mechanical project either, they just want a car THEY won't have to work on (or pay for repair.)

Also, one of us joked about what cars are old enough. We all get the joke but to the young hobbiest nothing will run them off faster than what they see as a condesending old timer. When I was a teenager in the early 1980s I hated it and we as a group are VERY bad about that. A snide comment to show what an expert you are and that you know more than the "kid" may make you feel good but it will not win any goodwill.

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