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Can anyone ID this old frame?


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Platform style rear springs like these were used on Cadillac 1910-1914, along with other cars from that era. That drilled piece above the front crossmember should be a good clue if it is an original feature and not some add on. Nice save!

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As 1937hd45 said, it has similarities to a Cadillac frame of 1910-1915 era, but it is NOT a Cadillac frame. Loziers also used the platform rear spring set up as well as the bottle neck frame from the transmission forward. But this diffently NOT a Lozier either.

It is right hand drive, but having the tie rod portion in front of the axle is unusual as this would be prone to damage. The welded cross member is unusual, as is the subframe assembly. The rear contracting brakes might be clue too.

The knowledge base on early chassis such as this is getting scarce.

Hopefully, someone will identify this. It looks to be very solid and very well worth saving.

Where are you located? Is it for sale?

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1937hd45 and Lozierman seem to be right on about the frame being from the 1910-1914 period. The cars I found on the net seem most similar to that era and the spokes are oval and the wood felloes are rounded which also seem early.

Looking again, I think this may be an early truck frame.

I also thought about it being a truck frame but didn't know if trucks had platform style rear springs?

What is the wheelbase?

As I remember, the wheel base is 103” but will measure it again today.

Where are you located? Is it for sale?

The frame is located in Iowa and really haven’t given much thought about selling... have to sleep on it.

It is right hand drive, but having the tie rod portion in front of the axle is unusual as this would be prone to damage.

Sharp eye! I studied that frame a few times and never noticed it being right hand drive. What cars used right hand drive in the early teens here in the states?:confused:

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All early cars were pretty much right hand drive, that was the norm. In 1909 Ford decided to switch to left hand steer and eventually all others followed. By about 1914, Ford had over half the American market to themselves and even most of the hold out car companies had gone to left hand steer.

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Think car chassis not truck. If it was a truck it was based on a car chassis. The week spot for many an old vehicle was the rear axle. Overload a bolted together 100 year old car rear axle and you have a rear axle that will bend, buckle and break. I don't see aluminum castings (like yours ) being used much in a commercial truck. Most bigger trucks of that vintage used a straight heavy bar with driven chain sprockets on the ends of the axles. A solid hunk of iron was used to support the load. Then there was often a chain driving rear axle solidly mounted to the axle. Think car for your chassis.

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Ben, I think you're right... the rear end seems awful light for a truck. The frame appears to be a large passenger car. Also, had a few minutes and measured the wheel base and it measures 130" NOT 103" as I previously thought. I guess my dyslexia's kicking in!:(

Frame sure is a puzzle!

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YES! I'm looking at a Mitchell sales brochure and the Model S has a 130 wheelbase. The front axle used that unique spindle design has a front mounted tie rod too. Is that aluminun cover on the rear axle just a removable cover and not a total aluminum center section. If my camera could take closeup photos I'd post them. wish the brochure showed that drilled front crossmenter section. :) The brochure calls the front axle a Lemoine pivot style.

WAG--1910 Mitchell Model S
Edited by 1937hd45 (see edit history)
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It is a 1910-11 Mitchell Model S. Serial nimber will be on top of center cross member, should start with S. This will tell you what year it is.

I have two of these chassis.

Unfortunatly the engines and trans for these are impossible.

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The Chassis is indeed a Mitchell Model S. This was Mitchells six cylinder offering for the 1910 - 11 seasons. The chassis number will give us a an exact fix on the year. There were three versions through this period.

I found little more than what you have here retired from service as a farm saw mill trailer when I was still in High School and have spent the past 30 years piecing it back together. the lads are right, the engines for these are nigh on impossible to find, only one has ever surfaced .

if you would like any other detailed information on these I'd be happy to help., please feel free to drop me a line. noeldpe@optusnet.com.au

Noel

post-64620-14313812781_thumb.jpg

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  • 2 years later...

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