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I thought I would puke


Bhigdog

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Jeff, most of the speed limits are still 55 which is easy for these cars, and they'll run 60-65 if you so desire. And on the 70 mph highways the big cars like the Buick 320 cid, the Packard 327 cid and larger, the Chrysler New Yorker, the Cadillac V-8 and others will run right along with the rest, again if you so desire. And at the same time, they didn't sound like a chain saw like so many of these little cars today.

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My 37 chevy p/u was done at 55,I had it up to 70 a few times but it sounded like it was going to come apart so I did not push it. I dont mind taking the back road but I dont want to be forced to so I need them to go just a little faster,I know the big cars of that era could but not many of the low priced cars were geared for anything over 60 I know the roads were not as good back then as they are today and the motors did not have the power either but I have no trailer and have to drive them.

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I frequent a number of automotive forums that run the gamut . From the AACA to the HAMB. I have a very open mind when it comes to autos as my primary focus is on the metalworking and extreme attention to the detail that goes into an auto, be it stock , racing or custom.

What I find somewhat amusing ( no disrespect intended) is that there are guys on the HAMB(a forum dedicated to traditional hot rods and customs) that are just as passionate about restoring an old rod or custom back exactly like it was in 1952 ( I confess to be one of them)and they are having just as difficult a time dealing with the new people that are taking up the rod and custom hobby straying from what it was and they would hope it would continue to be.

There is a point where unfortunately some makes or models of early automobiles will become extinct. Hopefully all who have this passion for the auto will realize were all in this together and can work for the benefit of all involved. Thanks to people like SAR in Portland you can secure a new 33/34 Ford 3 window body as well as the rest of the sheetmetal for the car. I'm sure this effort is a benefit to all. Especially if you have to find a good set of front fenders for one of these cars.

Where will it all end is anyones guess. One thing for sure it will be a matter of aestetics and economics as to what will survive. The cars are not any different than an old relic from the past. Some will forever occupy a special place in the future with little or no effort and others future hang on a thread held by someone that will forever hold a place in their heart .

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The old trucks were made to work not take for a leisurely sunday drive and would not like to have been a over the road truck driver with what they had to drive and the roads to drive them on,since my 37 will never haul a load again I do want to go a little faster.

Well, most trucks were worse in that area than the cars, some up through the 1960s. My dad had a 1969 Chevy 1 ton with the in line six and what must have been a 5.13 gear. Whew!
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It may be part of the other story about the dies being sold to Japan.:rolleyes:

Does anyone know what happened to the tooling after Graham and Hupp were done? I thought I read years ago that there were some unfinished 4 door bodies around. Is that B.S.?
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AACA stands firmly behind the preservation and restoration of vehicles from our history. We are one of a small group of clubs that have taken this stand. Other clubs are more inclusive, I am a member of some of those clubs as well. However, I totally believe in what we do and in the importance of our stance.

And again, I think that is totally appropriate. Again, however, there does seem to be a slippery slope. Putting a small block Chevy in a 1930s car is not allowed, but this forum apparently has no problems with threads about swapping a 3800SC motor into a Reatta, which never offered that engine. That's not exactly "preservation". Where does one draw the line? Does putting a late model T5 overdrive transmission behind the flathead in an otherwise stock 32 Ford count as preservation? How about swapping the Stovebolt six in a 50s Chevy for a GMC 302? Is that prohibited if I did it today? How about if the same swap had been done in 1954?

At one time I thought if you were a car nut, you were a car nut. I have come to see a huge amount of extremism in the car hobby in general. Whether it be the editor of a magazine who offers a "reward" for anyone who would turn a Duesenberg into a street rod or a person who is offended by someone who builds a rod out of new parts or thrashed car parts that nobody wants, it is a very skewed way of looking at things.

I think the fundamental difference here is that nearly all hotrodders I know can also appreciate a totally stock restoration.

As another poster has said, this debate has gone on for decades, even at the very beginning of the hobby. We will never resolve it on this website but this forum should be mostly about antique cars. There are many great sites for the street rod and hot rod community.

Keep in mind that "antique" now covers my 1984 Olds Custom Cruiser. Is the reality that the objection is to modifying 1930s and older cars?

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Joe, I wouldn't know what a 1984 Olds looked like unless you posted a photo, much over what is stock or modified. Important thing to me is I DON'T CARE, the hobby is loosing interest in Pre 1943 vehicles. If someone wants to save one by restoring or rodding that is fine with me. The AACA is loosing people IMO because of the quest of the perfect 400 point car, and bashing people with anything less that perfect as it left the factory finish. Hot rodders that I personally know are into having fun, and most share a deep interest in the history of the automobile.

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Bob...I have no disagreement at all about the discussion, I am glad it is mostly civil and it is the same discussion that goes on in magazines, other websites and among friends. This is one that there will never be universal agreement on.

Joe, one thing about this forum, it is open to other clubs who do have modified cars. We are not about to tell OCA or the Buick club that they cannot discuss engine swaps and the like. That is for them to decide. We as a club have always expressed what we believe in but no campaign to be "anti" to any other club's belief system. Kind of like worshipping in your own place but not finding fault with others who worship in a different way.

I think the fundamental difference here is that nearly all hot rodders I know can also appreciate a totally stock restoration. Joe, I have to respectfully disagree that this is a generality shared by everyone. I know hot rodders who literally hate stock vehicles and have put that in writing. I know people with AACA national awards who have a hot rod or street rod in their garage.

Everyone has their own reality Joe, some could care less if a 70's or 80's car is modified some still see it as a danger to our history. My personal opinion (has nothing to do with the club) is that I hate seeing a rare car modified. To see a '38 Olds Convertible, dual sidemounts, rumble seat with a 455 Olds does bother me, a LOT. Yet, I have seen cars that no restorer seems to wants that have been turned into a work of art. I would rather see that happen than the car rust away. I have a friend that is building an amazing car that defies description. Is it a coach built car? A resto-rod? A street rod? I know he has been searching what to call it but the vehicle is mostly hand fabricated. I am glad I got to see it but equally glad to see the stock Duesenberg being restored right next to it.

There is probably room for all of us to like what we like. I am just glad that AACA exists to stand up for saving a history that should not be lost. Once it is gone, it is gone and then we have lost if for future generations. I look at my cars as nothing that I own, just as something I am a caretaker of for hopefully some younger person in the future to enjoy as I do.

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What's even worse is the guy I know that has a 1959 Chev Impalla convert, 60 2dr hardtop, 61 2dr hardtop, 62 2dr hardtop and a 63 2dr hardtop, 47 Cadillac, 41 Ford coup rusting literally into the ground in the woods behind a field. He used to have a 68 Corvette convertible sitting in the yard with the hard top laying in the yard full of water growing mosquitoes and salamanders.

And he won't sell any of them.

I almost got on my knees and begged for the 59 convert. and he wanted something like 3000.00 for it. There was a tree growing up through the hood.

Great thread guys.

Bill Harmatuk

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1937hd45,

If you think that AACA is only about newer old cars and 400 point cars, you are missing the boat. You should be in Fuquay-Varina NC and see how much fun we are having driving 1931 and earlier cars this week!

Yes, my car is a Senior Grand National Winner, but I have it out here burning up the roads with about 74 other cars including stuff like a 1912 E-M-F, a 1914 Hudson, a 1914 Pullman, a few Model T Fords, lots of other Model A Fords, Buicks, Packards, Studebakers, Franklins, Chryslers, Nash, Chevrolets and others.

Great fun with Great People and Great cars! Touring is AACA at its best!

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Yes, you have a great point Mat, but Touring people are a far different crowd that the pick the car apart on the showfield or Forum people. Haven't had the '12 T Touring out in 12 years now, maybe 2010 will be different.

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Steve, thanks for the reaffirmation of the AACA's values and direction. It's why I'm here. In the future I'll try to be only "ill" ( but I can't promise)..............Bob

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1937hd45,

I would have to disagree...

My car is a Senior Grand National Winner. I am touring with that same car. I am also a Judge. I intend to take that same car to New Bern next year to compete for Repeat Senior Grand National. Call me crazy if you want to, but I enjoy it all.... even though Touring is the best!

So, I guess under your definition, I have Three different personalities. I guess I am crazy!

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No, We're BOTH normal, I had a Grand National winner, did Judge AACA for 30 years, liked Touring a LOT, and have a race car and Hot Rod under restoration. Seeing a car like yours on Tour is always a joy.:)

1937hd45,

I would have to disagree...

My car is a Senior Grand National Winner. I am touring with that same car. I am also a Judge. I intend to take that same car to New Bern next year to compete for Repeat Senior Grand National. Call me crazy if you want to, but I enjoy it all.... even though Touring is the best!

So, I guess under your definition, I have Three different personalities. I guess I am crazy!

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Matt, you didn't mention the Essex with the crazy fueling system that's on the tour. Ha. I'm different than the guy who would rather see a street rod than to see the car rust away in the woods. I just don't like representing something to the public that is a counterfiet of what is an authentic version of true history. Sorry, I really mean no harm, but that's how I feel. I have a Grand National Senior that I've driven on many, many tours. In fact, it's been about 25,000 miles since it was restored in 1981 and it still can win. Most people are afraid to do it because they're afraid they'll lose some of that high weight value. I don't care about the money, and I guess that's obvious since my motto seems to be "buy high, sell low". I just love the thrill of finding, buying, restoring and driving, but I want it to look like it was meant to look like when the factory designed it...period. But, in my 71 years I have found that people are going to continue to be people.

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Yes... The Essex...

Everybody should check out the Vintage Tour thread to see Wayne's "engineering?"... He beat me to posting photos of his handy work... I am still threatening to post some other photos of Wayne and his Essex. I will do so in time....

Earl, I seem to normally buy high and sell low so I know how that feels. I try to refrain from saying ugly things so I will try not to say much about modified cars. I will say that I agree with your sentiments and I also prefer them original or restored to original.

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All I can say is I am glad I dont show any of my vehicles in points shows that way I dont have to worry about loosing points with the wear and tear,mine are all drivers or 20 footers. I was suprised I got a trophy with the 37 a couple weeks ago and I did not have time to clean it up before the show.

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junkyardjeff,

The point that Earl and I are making is that it is possible to have a correctly restored car that you drive, maintain, and still compete with in AACA judging successfully.

Earl does it with Buicks. I do it with a 1929 Model A Ford. The only thing that I can't do with the Model A is drive on Interstates. Earl, can certainly drive his Buicks on Interstates. Contrary to what some people believe, antique cars were made to be driven and still can be driven.

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Matt, you can't say too many things bad about anybody. As a policeman you are too used to saying "Good Evening Sir, thank you for your permit, here is your ticket, have a wonderful day, Sir" haha

As for driving on the Interstate, I don't do that anymore unless I have to. Too many tractor trailer trucks throwing rocks on the Interstate. Also, with torque tube drive, and very few modern mechanics who know what to do with it, I don't see any sense in using up the few remaining NOS parts by driving to shows and tours a long distance away when I can trailer it there, with A/C in the Suburban and then drive it however much I need to do on the tour.

And, oh, this too. I'll bet nobody on that tour is having more fun doing it than Wayne is. He's liable to not fix the Essex just so he can have that much fun again the next time. Hahaha

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I am just glad I dont have that headache trying to maintain a high point car,I am glad you guys can do it but I am not even going to try. I like nice cars but I wont ever get that fussy over show cars and I want no part of high point show cars as I like my drivers,life is too short to worry about stuff like that and you should be able to tell I am not a car show type person and more of a cruise in type.

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To you it would be a headache. But to many it is like therapy without the couch. :rolleyes:

Sadly a little over a year ago we lost a very dear friend. He had the most beautiful 1912 Brass Model T. It was midnight blue with black fenders. Leather straps to hold down the top.

Doy would hand polish every piece of brass on that car every time it came back from being out. He had special handmade flannel lined covers made for all the brass pieces, and there were a lot of them.

His wife had many medical and mental issues until she passed away. That brass T, and the other two cars that he had, were his therapy. The stress of caring for her washed away as he worked on those cars. Especially "The Little Blue Jewel" as he called the brass T.

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I get my therapy by scrouging the junkyards,swapmeets and tinkering with my cars and driving them and socializing at the cruise ins. I dont take it as seriously as some but I have a good time and so far have not needed to be insitutionalized.

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Joe, one thing about this forum, it is open to other clubs who do have modified cars. We are not about to tell OCA or the Buick club that they cannot discuss engine swaps and the like. That is for them to decide.

Thanks for that clarification. I did not appreciate the distinction.

We as a club have always expressed what we believe in but no campaign to be "anti" to any other club's belief system. Kind of like worshipping in your own place but not finding fault with others who worship in a different way.

I think that's great. I am still mystified by those who feel the need to start these threads in the first place, however.

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