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Help with paint selection


Guest tdebuys

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Guest tdebuys

We recently purchased both a 1934 4-Door PE Delux and a 1936 4 door Sedan. As we look at the specific paint chips for those model years, I must say that the Dupont chips all look black to me. So, a couple of questions.....were the 1934 cars ordered in 33 restricted to just 34 colors or not? Same question for 36 cars ordered in 35. This of course would increase slightly the choices. I've looked at several fine specimen photos that seem to be painted correctly but none of them match the chips Dupont shows. I like a deep burgandy, but the reds all look utterly black to me, and I've viewed them on several monitors. Any conversation here would be helpful.

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We recently purchased both a 1934 4-Door PE Delux and a 1936 4 door Sedan. As we look at the specific paint chips for those model years, I must say that the Dupont chips all look black to me. So, a couple of questions.....were the 1934 cars ordered in 33 restricted to just 34 colors or not? Same question for 36 cars ordered in 35. This of course would increase slightly the choices. I've looked at several fine specimen photos that seem to be painted correctly but none of them match the chips Dupont shows. I like a deep burgandy, but the reds all look utterly black to me, and I've viewed them on several monitors. Any conversation here would be helpful.

Colours were set by model year. Thus a 1934 Plymouth offered the same colours whether the car was built in calendar year 1933 or calendar year 1934.

The chips on the DuPont site have not aged well. There is another site with Ditzler chips and they are not much better. I would go with the photos you have seen.

The deep burgundy should be just that - a very deep red. Black is too dark.

I have been working on collecting the correct colours for the cars of the 1930's. Will check and see if I have got the correct Plymouth shades done yet.

Bill

Vancouver, BC

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Guest tdebuys

Sure Bill, let me know what you find or might suggest. I don't want to mess the cars up by using a wrong color, but I sure hate shades of black too. Thanks, TDE

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Guest martylum

Hi-Many color chip charts of the 30s are badly oxidized and appear to be variations on black.

I have used a PPG paint vendor to have small amounts of color mixed by color name, code, year, make and gotten to see the color by spraying foot square test panels with this material. A paint vendor should be willing and able to make up batches as small as 6-8 ounces if they have the code in their files.

Most recently they mixed me a batch of a 1929 color for which I could not find a color chip only the color name on the factory invoice from Chrysler. Turned out to be a very period looking teal color which we used to spray the bead moldings.The name-Colorado River Obsidian Blue. PPG does better than DuPont on color chips on early 30s and even 20s colors. I don't believe DuPont has colors in their library files going back beyond 1933.

Martin Lum

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Guest tdebuys

THANK YOU Martin !!!! I told Dupont I thought their chips had altered over time and were not as dull and glum as portrayed on their present color chart, but they insist not. I did read the paint formulas and they indeed do have a tremendous preference for adding black pigment. Now that I've heard from you I will most certainly find the closest PPG vendor and see what they can do for me. I just refuse to paint my beautiful cars in colors that are totally disgusting. I like period paint, but when burgandy has to have the sun shining on it to even have a faint red cast something is wrong.

Thanks, Tom

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