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1939 Buick upholstry options!!!


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Fantastic Earl.

Allan emailed me that bulletin and it's brilliant. I'm probably going to sound like a lawyer and I apologise in advance, but the wording of the bulletin regarding sequoia cream was "available at no exta cost on convertible models only". I took that to mean that if you had a convertible, and you wanted that color, it wouldn't cost you any extra, but if you wanted it on a regular model, you would have to pay the extra. It's just my interpretation, and I'm in no way saying that you are wrong, Earl! The evidence is definitely in your favor! I'll flick you an email later today.

Cheers

Grant

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Ha Grant,

It's a good thing you're in Australia or I'd have to call you a "Philadelphia Lawyer" (that's a joke term here for people who can find a hole in any argument). //That quote is meant in jest only, not sarcasm// I guess I have to agree that in a backwards way you could defend the color on a closed car. It would be very odd wording, but it wouldn't be the first time a car company did that. Just witness the Shop Manual's that I can't comprehend.

However, for forty years since I obtained that Bulletin, I have always believed it said on convertibles only, you could have that color at no extra cost. I believe it would have specifically said you could have it on closed cars at extra cost and then they'd have put in the " (x) " which they used to denote extra cost on the sheet. ACTUALLY, in looking at the document again, the only color with an asterisk ( * ) is the Sequoia Cream, and therefore it means to me to absolutely say that this color is available only on the convertible, because they do not denote any extra cost for any color, including Sequoia Cream. Oh well, I guess it's like reading tea leaves.

Who can tell 70 years later who meant what, huh?

I'm including a picture of the '39 Buick sedan I have for sale out of necessity so you can show it to your friends. Maybe one of them will just have to ship it to Australia. By the way, do you or Allan know Rex Stubbs of the Australian Buick Club, who also has a 1939 Buick?

Best regards, Earl

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Edited by Dynaflash8 (see edit history)
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Actually, calling me an Aussie is one of the most insulting things you could call a Kiwi! I think I'll stick with Philly lawyer! I'm in Christchurch, New Zealand. Our coupe was a Californian car that made it's way to Denver, where we bought it on eBay over 18 months ago. If you search Me And My Buick, you can see pictures of it. Work has slowed up a bit, as my father, who's car it is, has a bad back and is on a waiting list for an operation. Stupid public health system. He's the same age as you! I hope you've looked after yourself better than he has! I'm glad you've got a sense of humor. Things can get lost in translation! I don't know Rex, but I've seen his car online.

Cheers

Grant

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Earl: Thanks for the posting. Very informative. That literature would seem to indicate that 538 was intended for convertibles only; but it's hard to dispute that Buick showed that color on some dealer postcards of sedans as well as the inside cover of the full line catalog. Of course we know literature pictures ain't always the truth. I also checked my factory rectangular spiral bound 39 color chip booklet with 3 car outlines to be placed over the chips. It also lists the upholstery options by model. Under the listing of the colors it specifically states all colors available on all models. HMM! What now to believe? A 90L in Sequoia Cream???

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Yeah, Dave [Rex]/Glassesguy, and they made mid year changes too. For example, my convertible coupe was Lassen Green Poly and will be restored in the original color and that was a mid-year introduction color. The only thing I can say about what the plastic booklet says as opposed to the Engineering Document is that the plastic booklet was printed by advertising people, and we know they like to "tell their own story." I'm going to stick with the Engineering document as to where I'll put my money.

I have that little plastic booklet too, although mine is falling apart. I had forgotten that they had the trims listed on the back of that in fact.

Grant, with regard to my age. Man, you can't run away from age. I had an operation in 2008 that really slowed me down, and then this past July I came down with Cellulitis in one leg that had me on my back for 5 weeks. I sure hope that 2010 will be a better year healthwise. I'm truly sorry I got you mixed up with Allan....at least I think Allan is in Australia. But in any case now I know you're in New Zealand. Haha.

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All of this 1939 Buick conversation has wetted my appetite once more to ask if anybody, anywhere has a 1939 Color and Trim Book (Dealer Album) that they will sell? I've seen two in my lifetime, and there is a guy in Southern California I know who says he has one. I've been looking for one for 50 years!!!!!!

:)

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Earl: I see your sheet lists Dante Red as an optional wheel color for black cars. I recall our departed friend Bob Jones (BCA 872) telling me Buick released a Bulletin for Dante Red as an option later in the year. Was it available with all colors?? Mid year changes keep things interesting. By the way I still have the Lassen Green model 41. Used it for my daughter's wedding and other fun stuff, but its exhaust manifold has developed a small crack. Noisy on start up but quiet when warm. I agree, too, on the Caddy 62 series conv. vs. Buick 70 Series. Same body, and both built on an assembly line. Good luck on this one. I was surprised, too, when I found out the Buick 80 Series Limited was elevated to full classic status. So it would seem the 39 80 Series should be accorded the same honor. As you and I know, it's just different sheet metal on the front end!

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Grant.......I'm truly sorry I got you mixed up with Allan....at least I think Allan is in Australia. But in any case now I know you're in New Zealand.
Can understand its easy to get confused. I live is Aussie, my 39's (unrestored) are in NZ (not too far from Grant), I have a NZ passport & Aussie & NZ drivers licences. NZ is closer to Melbourne than many parts of Aussie. Edited by 1939_buick (see edit history)
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Dave, I was told by a former CCCA Board Member who called me last night, that the information I had heard about the 1940 Series 80 was incorrect and it has not been elevated to Full Classic Status. Regarding the late Bob Jones, he was BCA #54 and I am BCA #55. We were the first two old BCCA members to join BCA when the California BCCA Region went National after BCCA failed. I corresponded regularly with him, and he did have those dealer bulletins. He sent copies to me, but somehow they were misplaced or lost in my moves. He or I also sent them to Lewis Jenkins in NC, who I am sure still has them. There were a lot of changes in mid-stream and you are correct about the Dante Red wheels. Whipcord also became available in the smaller cars in mid-year as I recall. Bob and I always thought that his convertible may have been one I tried to buy as a teenager in Arlington, VA, because he found old matchbooks from the Old Dominion Bank of Arlington under the seats. Somewhere I have pictures of his car as it was being restored.

Dave, are you the man in Toledo, OH who had a really rough '39 46-C for sale that I stopped to see. That man had a really beautiful original '39 sedan in Lassen green with the original paint on it. Gosh, how many years ago that was!

Edited by Dynaflash8 (see edit history)
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Earl: I happen to have a '39 Color and Trim dealers album book,which I found years ago shortly after buying my '39 81-c. I has very nice paint samples,convertble top samples,as well as interior fabric and leather samples. The piece has an leather cover with a floral pattern embossed upon it. Though it's not in the best of shape it seems to be complete. While it's not for sale,it is a nice piece to have found.Speaking of convertible top samples,there was a rather rude light blue canvas top material offered for convertibles that year which I've never seen on a car and can understand why. Best Regards,Tom

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Tom, Yours makes five I've heard tell of. I saw one of those at the home of the late Richard Boyer in Hanover, PA. I had my hands on it! However, Skip (Richard Jr.) tells me he never remembers seeing it, and despite looking he's never found it. I have to wonder if Dick sold it to one of the other two guys who have one now. The 5th one was loaned to one of the other two guys who have one, and it was lost in a flood. Am I correct that you live on the West Coast of Florida? If so, I wouldn't mind driving over to the West Coast on some Friday just to see and feel the book. Earl Beauchamp BCA #55, Sebring, FL

Edited by Dynaflash8 (see edit history)
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Earl: I'm the guy. Sorry about the mixup on Bob's #. What a guy. That convertible was sold some time ago, but it carried Trim # 764 which was Red Leather and Cloth. The rear quarter trim panels of red leatherette were all that was left of the interior; but that Trim # proved cloth trim was available in convertibles contrary some of the prevailing wisdom at that time.

If anyone ever finds a 39 Color and Trim, I hope a copy finds its way to the Buick Heritage Group for permanent reference.

Back to an upholstery question: are the non cushion seat surfaces in your sedan leather or leatherette? I assume leatherette.

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Dave, I used a matching vinyl in place of the original Pantasote, which we called leatherette as a slang term. Pantasote was no longer available. That included the windlace, headliner, sun visors and front seatback (better defined as the back or the back or the front seat I suppose). However, on the door panels themselves I used real leather as would have been done in a Roadmaster or Limited. I think the door panels might have been leatherette in the Special and Century.

Edited by Dynaflash8 (see edit history)
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My 1939 41 door side panels are real leather. But as these may have been made in NZ and not US could be different to US cars.

And yet the NZ 1939 Chevs had only the seat tops in leather. The rest was in a leatherette that I've heard an old upholsterer call "rexine", with a cloth headlining, and flocked sunvisors! I wish someone would make right hand drive floor mats for the Chev! Rhode Island Wiring make right hand drive looms.

Cheers

Grant

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Guys:

I guess I should "fess-up" on this subject. I bought one these trim books about 30 years ago in virtually NOS condition and still have it in my literature collection for the 39 Roadmaster. I have never seen another one.

Regards, Dave Corbin

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Where do you live in Texas Dave? I'll be bringing one of my '39 Buicks to the AACA Sentimental Tour next March. That's going to be headquartered for the week in Kerrville, Texas. I'd love to see and feel that book. As one of the most long-term and prolific 1939 Buick collectors (I think) in the country, I don't know how one of these books could have eluded me for all of these years. Earl Beauchamp

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